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NEWS
August 25, 2013
Fall is approaching and this summer, with all the rain, has been kind to my lawn. What should I be thinking about doing as the seasons change? Carrie Engel of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville says now is a good time to get rid of any perennial weeds. She recommends Crab-E-Rad. Then, in a few weeks when the weather is cooler, it will be safe to seed. "Don't worry about the crabgrass," she said. "It's an annual and if you apply pre-emergent crabgrass preventer next spring, it will take care of it. " But the summer rains have given the other weeds what they need to thrive.
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NEWS
August 25, 2013
Fall is approaching and this summer, with all the rain, has been kind to my lawn. What should I be thinking about doing as the seasons change? Carrie Engel of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville says now is a good time to get rid of any perennial weeds. She recommends Crab-E-Rad. Then, in a few weeks when the weather is cooler, it will be safe to seed. "Don't worry about the crabgrass," she said. "It's an annual and if you apply pre-emergent crabgrass preventer next spring, it will take care of it. " But the summer rains have given the other weeds what they need to thrive.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Donald LeRoy Calp, a retired air-traffic control engineer, died of an acute pulmonary hemorrhage Jan. 17 at his Columbia home. He was 79. Born in Manchester, he was a 1950 Sparks High School graduate. He also attended Edison Junior College in Fort Myers, Fla. Mr. Calp served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After he left military service in 1957, he joined the Bendix Field Engineering Corp., where he worked for nearly 40 years. He traveled to Korea, Iceland, Cuba, Florida, Australia, Madagascar, Alaska and Saudi Arabia before he returned to Maryland in 1975.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 16, 2012
Maryland's law limiting lawn fertilizer practices doesn't kick in for more than a year yet, but state officials are urging homeowners to get a jump on the new curbs by limiting how much grass food they put down now. At a press conference in Annapolis to kick off Earth Week, state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance said there's no reason not to start using greener lawn and gardening practices at home this year.  He said restoring the Chesapeake...
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2000
In a plush green yard in West Friendship, flat gray stones form a walkway and are neatly piled into small walls around a garden of bushes and flowers. Such amenities are common these days, said the property's landscaper, Rob Boswell of Budding Branch Landscape and Design. Three years ago, however, most homeowners would have chosen a less expensive concrete sidewalk leading to their house, rather than a fancy stone one. They probably wouldn't have opted for the walls around their garden either, Boswell said.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | October 20, 2011
I have often thought of downsizing. Even when the children were babies, I daydreamed about a smaller house to clean, with fewer rooms for them to scatter their messes. But I have never been sure I could leave my neighborhood behind. And I don't think I could walk away from the house that has been the scene of so many memories. And I am certain I could never leave my garden. I can't imagine driving by my old house a season or two later and seeing that new owners had plowed everything under because they know what I ignore: My garden is too much work.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
Sunday, April 8 'Next to Normal' Red Branch Theatre Company presents this rock musical about a family trying to take care of itself the best way it knows how through April 22 at the Drama Learning Center, 9130-I Red Branch Road in Columbia. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $18, $16 for seniors and students. Information: 410-997-9352 or redbranchtheatre.com/index.html. Wednesday, April 11 Master gardener series The Oakland Mills Community Association presents "Create a Flower Arrangement" at 7 p.m. at The Other Barn, 5851 Robert Oliver Place.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
A University of Maryland biosystems engineer wants farmers to burn switchgrass for fuel, Frank Roylance of The Sun reports. It grows any old where and doesn't require any tending. The energy from an acre of switchgrass is the same as that of 2,000 gallons of fuel oil. First we thought, "How do you suppose the front yard would look planted in switchgrass?" Then we thought, "Why switchgrass?" What's wrong with crabgrass? Or dandelions? Or that vine we can never remember the name of, that looks like it ought to pull out easily by the roots but doesn't?
NEWS
By Dick George | July 2, 1998
THE OTHER day a big truck came and dumped a pile of mulch in front of my house. Evidently we had ordered it.I have always cut my grass and that's about it. From the logic standpoint, I'm not sure even about that, except if you don't cut it, the land returns to wilderness, which kind of appeals to me but the neighbors don't like it. Property values and all. So I cut the grass.Over the years I have made other concessions. Last year I bought a fancy edger. At the time, it seemed important to find my sidewalk.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
Sunday, April 8 'Next to Normal' Red Branch Theatre Company presents this rock musical about a family trying to take care of itself the best way it knows how through April 22 at the Drama Learning Center, 9130-I Red Branch Road in Columbia. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $18, $16 for seniors and students. Information: 410-997-9352 or redbranchtheatre.com/index.html. Wednesday, April 11 Master gardener series The Oakland Mills Community Association presents "Create a Flower Arrangement" at 7 p.m. at The Other Barn, 5851 Robert Oliver Place.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Donald LeRoy Calp, a retired air-traffic control engineer, died of an acute pulmonary hemorrhage Jan. 17 at his Columbia home. He was 79. Born in Manchester, he was a 1950 Sparks High School graduate. He also attended Edison Junior College in Fort Myers, Fla. Mr. Calp served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After he left military service in 1957, he joined the Bendix Field Engineering Corp., where he worked for nearly 40 years. He traveled to Korea, Iceland, Cuba, Florida, Australia, Madagascar, Alaska and Saudi Arabia before he returned to Maryland in 1975.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | October 20, 2011
I have often thought of downsizing. Even when the children were babies, I daydreamed about a smaller house to clean, with fewer rooms for them to scatter their messes. But I have never been sure I could leave my neighborhood behind. And I don't think I could walk away from the house that has been the scene of so many memories. And I am certain I could never leave my garden. I can't imagine driving by my old house a season or two later and seeing that new owners had plowed everything under because they know what I ignore: My garden is too much work.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bon-brest and Nancy Jones Bon-brest,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2007
Andy Herman Regional manager TruGreen LandCare, Essex Salary --$65,000 Age --33 Years on the job --10 How he got started --After graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in landscape contracting and horticulture, Herman was recruited by TruGreen to work in Delaware as an assistant supervisor in its commercial landscaping division. He is now a regional manager supervising more than $900,000 in contracts for lawn care, ground maintenance, landscaping and weed removal at businesses.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2006
Jay Rhine's ancestors purchased a dairy farm in West Friendship in 1923. Rhine was the fourth generation of Rhine dairy farmers when he started mowing lawns on the side for a little extra cash. Nine years later, the lawn-mowing business had grown into a major landscaping company with 60 full-time employees, including an architect, an arborist and 20 masons. Rhine Lawn Care and Landscaping provides pretty much everything a person could need on his or her property, from mowing and pruning to complex architectural creations such as patios, pool decks and retaining walls.
NEWS
March 29, 1992
Four common mistakes can keep your lawn from looking its best. Avoidthem, and your grass has a chance to be the envy of the neighborhood, says Dr. Thomas R. Turner, turf grass management specialist for theCooperative Extension Service, Maryland Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources.The four common mistakes are:Using poor quality seed -- You might pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for varieties suited to Maryland conditions, but the added cost is worthwhile when you consider germination results and pesticide reduction.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
A University of Maryland biosystems engineer wants farmers to burn switchgrass for fuel, Frank Roylance of The Sun reports. It grows any old where and doesn't require any tending. The energy from an acre of switchgrass is the same as that of 2,000 gallons of fuel oil. First we thought, "How do you suppose the front yard would look planted in switchgrass?" Then we thought, "Why switchgrass?" What's wrong with crabgrass? Or dandelions? Or that vine we can never remember the name of, that looks like it ought to pull out easily by the roots but doesn't?
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 17, 2004
October may seem a peculiar time to ponder lawn maintenance -- like snow shovels in June. But it's actually the perfect time. For one thing, if you have a lawn service (for growth and health, not necessarily mowing), fall is a good time to assess and renew, or drop, the contract. For another, lawn chores are far less time-critical than in midspring. "If you want to choose a lawn-care company, the best time ... is very early spring or fall," says Joe Pinelli, marketing manager for ChemLawn in Baltimore.
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