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NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
Get out your hoes, rakes, shovels and pruning shears. Spring is here and county gardens are ready to be worked.The first task before you is aeration and dethatching, which should be done before lawns are treated with fertilizers and herbicides. Aeration will reduce soil compaction so that water and nutrients can penetrate the soil.Thatching is a mechanical process that removes excess debris. Even homeowners who bag their grass clippings can't get them all. The clippings tend to settle into the grass near the soil and build up. They are slow to decompose.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Several creditors of Commerce Corp. filed an involuntary bankruptcy petition against the Maryland-based distributor of lawn and garden supplies. In the petition filed last week, five creditors claim they are owed a combined $1.73 million from the Curtis Bay distributor and want it placed in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy liquidation. The creditors are DeWitt Co. Inc. in Missouri; Franklin Electric Co. Inc. of Indiana; Dramm Corp. of Wisconsin; and Premier Horticulture Inc. and J.R. Peters Inc., both of Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
November 18, 1993
A 54-year-old Manchester man was arrested in Westminster Tuesday and charged with stealing lawn and garden tractors and several over-the-road utility trailers.The Maryland Vehicle Theft Task Force charged Buck Alvar Harris of stealing the equipment, removing the identification numbers and attempting to sell the stolen equipment. He was released on his own recognizance by a court commissioner.The MVTTF said its investigation of Mr. Harris parallels interstate thefts in which a large quantity of lawn and garden tractors have been stolen from dealers in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Commerce Corp., a lawn and garden supplies distributor based in Curtis Bay, notified state regulators that it was laying off between 60 and 70 workers. Commerce Corp., a lawn and garden supplies distributor based in Curtis Bay, notified state regulators Thursday that it was laying off between 60 and 70 workers. According to the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, Commerce initially said it was closing its principal office at 7603 Energy Parkway. The company later said it was not shutting operations there, but instead had started to lay off workers on Dec. 28, according to the agency.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1994
Commerce Corp., a Linthicum Heights-based distributor of lawn and garden products, plans to announce today that it will be searching for a 300,000-square-foot distribution center in the Baltimore area.Patricia B. Farrell, a spokeswoman for MacKenzie/O'Conor Piper & Flynn in Lutherville, said Commerce has not decided whether it will lease or buy an existing warehouse, or build one. A 300,000-square-foot project would be one of either the biggest leases or biggest construction jobs in the area for the year.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
SPLURGE OF THE WEEK MADE INTO A SHADE This lightweight tool, called the "soil scoop," handles a number of jobs in the garden. It can lift soil out of tight places, like pots and bags, without spilling. Its serrated edges are handy for opening bags or scoring soil away from the roots of new plants. Its pointed tip is perfect for digging furrows, and its bright colors make it easy to find in the garden. Visit your local lawn and garden center or go to createagarden.com. Suggested price: $17.95.
NEWS
December 29, 1991
To help offset budget shortfalls, farmers and homeowners are being asked to pay a higher price for having their soil samples tested at the state soil-testing laboratory in College Park.Effective Wednesday, the price for both routine farm samples and lawn and garden testswill be raised $1, said Richard A. Weismiller, acting chairman for agronomy in the College of Agriculture at the University of Maryland.Weismiller reports that the charge for lawn and garden tests willincrease from $4 to $5 per sample and the price for routine farm field tests will rise from $5 to $6 per sample.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1994
Commerce Corp., a Linthicum Heights-based distributor of lawn and garden products, said yesterday that it is looking for a new headquarters in what could prove to be one of the biggest warehouse deals in the region this year.Company President Richard Lessans said the company will look for an existing 300,000-square-foot warehouse to replace the 187,000-square-foot building it will vacate near the junction of Interstate 695 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and a 100,000-square-foot space the company leased two years ago as an interim step to cope with sales growth.
NEWS
December 1, 1990
Services for George E. Perry Jr., a retired manufacturers' representative who participated in trade groups of the lawn and garden supply industry, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld Home, 6500 York Road.Mr. Perry, who was 78 and had lived on Overbrook Road in Rodgers Forge since 1954, died Wednesdayat College Manor after a long ill-ness.He retired almost 10 years ago, selling the Perry Sales Co., which he had started in 1959, to his son, who had become a partner in the business.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
Westminster feed sales business R. D. Bowman & Sons Inc. is scheduled to sign a contract this week to buy a nearby vacant store owned by its former rival Southern States Cooperative.Cooperative members voted in December to close the Westminster store after years of losses and increasing debts.The 62-year-old store at Englar and John streets competed with the family-owned Bowman store across Englar Road for 33 years after founder Ralph D. Bowman moved his store from Union Mills to Westminster.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
Commerce Corp., a Maryland-based distributor of lawn and garden supplies, said Thursday it is laying off some employees as it seeks to find a buyer or develop a new format. CEO Richard Lessans said the privately held company is still trying to determine how many of its 280 employees nationwide will be laid off. Commerce is based in Curtis Bay and has facilities in Grand Rapids, Mich., and Ontario, Calif. Some sales staff were told they were laid off. "The business is not closing," Lessans said.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | May 6, 2007
About 85 million U.S. households, or three of every four, do some sort of gardening and lawn care, according to the National Gardening Association. Those households each spend an average of about $400 a year on plants, power equipment, fertilizer, sod and other products and services that make up the $34.1 billion lawn and garden industry. To help you get the most bang for your buck, here are tips from experts: Do it yourself. The most obvious way to save money is not to hire a landscaper to mow the lawn, mulch and weed the flower beds.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | February 4, 2007
I ONCE PURCHASED DIRT from a mail-order garden catalog, and my children have never let me forget it. When it arrived, in big bags in bigger boxes, I opened it in the garage, and my son reacted with stunned silence, rare for him. Then he threw himself on the garage floor, clutched his heart and started howling about the squandering of his inheritance. "Bad news, Joe," I said. "There isn't one." I could have tried to defend the purchase - this was special dirt, specially concocted for special planters - but it would have been a waste of breath.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
SPLURGE OF THE WEEK MADE INTO A SHADE This lightweight tool, called the "soil scoop," handles a number of jobs in the garden. It can lift soil out of tight places, like pots and bags, without spilling. Its serrated edges are handy for opening bags or scoring soil away from the roots of new plants. Its pointed tip is perfect for digging furrows, and its bright colors make it easy to find in the garden. Visit your local lawn and garden center or go to createagarden.com. Suggested price: $17.95.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Lori Sears and Sarah Kickler Kelber and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | April 11, 2004
Maybe the kids used the walls as a canvas in a Picasso-inspired spurt of crayon creativity. Or the smudges around the light switches just won't budge. A wand won't help, but Mr. Clean's Magic Eraser might. The disposable cleaning pads feel like a dense foam brick, but when soaked and wrung out like a sponge, they're ready to rub out stains like a pencil eraser. We tried it on some stubborn soap scum that had refused to give way to harsh cleansers and, with a little elbow grease, had much success.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2002
If you take inspiration from a perfectly manicured lawn and garden, plan a visit to the William Paca House in the Annapolis Historic District. Briggs & Stratton, manufacturer of lawn mower engines, has named the property to its fifth annual list of the country's Top 10 Lawns. William Paca, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, developed the terraced gardens and used them for many grand parties. Now under the care of the Historic Annapolis Foundation and the State of Maryland, the grounds offer peaceful vistas and an opportunity to marvel at a reconstructed 18th-century garden featuring three terraces with a central walkway and turf alley.
FEATURES
By Joan Jackson and Joan Jackson,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 1997
It's no secret that gardening can be hard work leading to a pain in the back and blisters on the hand. And then the plant dies.But take heart, gardeners. Judging from products shown at the recent Western Nursery and Garden Expo in Las Vegas, the new gardening season will be a bit easier, faster and more foolproof.All kinds of garden goods point in that direction.One-step lawn repair kits, shake-and-grow flower gardens, ergonomically correct tools that are easier to use, and flowers -- even roses -- that are close to foolproof are some of the products that will line the aisles at neighborhood garden centers when serious growing kicks in this spring.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Starting tomorrow, students taking a horticulture course at Anne Arundel Community College will get a chance to find out how labor-intensive ecological gardening can be.Their training ground will be a 1-acre garden on a historic property in Annapolis.During the six-session course, "Gardening Using Ecological Principles," students will learn everything from how to use storm water in gardens to composting, planting waterway buffers and planting trees so they shade houses.The point, said Anne Pearson, director of the Alliance for Sustainable Communities, is to teach people that "green" gardens can be efficient.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1998
FAMILY GAMES AND food tuned to the tastes of pre-school through fifth-grade children are the highlights of activities during the sixth annual PTA Garden Party, to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the gym of Spring Garden Elementary.Carnival-style games at 25 cents per ticket are designed for all ages. Pizza, hot dogs, lemon sticks, pretzels, snowballs, soda and baked goods will be available.Children's crafts will include making bead necklaces and name bracelets. This year, face painting has been expanded to the full face, if desired.
FEATURES
By Joan Jackson and Joan Jackson,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 1997
It's no secret that gardening can be hard work leading to a pain in the back and blisters on the hand. And then the plant dies.But take heart, gardeners. Judging from products shown at the recent Western Nursery and Garden Expo in Las Vegas, the new gardening season will be a bit easier, faster and more foolproof.All kinds of garden goods point in that direction.One-step lawn repair kits, shake-and-grow flower gardens, ergonomically correct tools that are easier to use, and flowers -- even roses -- that are close to foolproof are some of the products that will line the aisles at neighborhood garden centers when serious growing kicks in this spring.
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