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NEWS
March 31, 2010
As University of Maryland law students on the verge of graduation, we could not be prouder of our participation in the law school's clinical program. We are the state's largest public interest law firm, and we try to do great things for people in need. Rather than list all our practice areas, it suffices to say that we handle the types of cases other lawyers might want but cannot afford to take, as well as the ones that others could accept but don't want to touch. Not only do we take tough and sometimes unpopular cases, but we do a fantastic job for our clients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Five fast reasons to check out "How to Get Away With Murder," the newest drama from Shonda Rhimes. 1. Culturally, it is fascinating to see the shift in authority figures from John Houseman's Prof. Kingsfield in "Paper Chase" (1973) to Viola Davis as Prof. Annalise Keating in this series four decades later. Also, intriguing is the shift in how Hollywood portrays first-year law school and the kinds of students one finds there. 2. No producer in the history of network TV has had a whole night of prime-time dramas coming out of her or his production company until this year with "Grey's Anatomy," "Scandal" and "Murder" all coming from Rhimes shop.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 7, 2013
The four announced candidates for attorney general got the opportunity to plead their cases to a tough audience Thursday evening -- law students at the University of Maryland's Carey Law School. With no Republicans running, few differences on issues emerged during a forum attended by the four Democrats in the race -- Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Dels. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County, Jon Cardin of Baltimore County and C. William Frick of Montgomery County.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Colin Cloherty was a seldom-used tight end for the San Francisco 49ers, his third team in his first two years in the NFL, when the league locked out its players at the start of a long, contentious labor showdown in 2011. A former standout at Brown, where he double-majored in history and political science, Cloherty pored over every memo the National Football League Players Association sent to its players after the union decertified and sued the NFL, and he listened intently during every conference call.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
University of Maryland business law students will get more hands-on experience and a taste of the corporate world as part of the school's expanding program. Under the direction of two new co-directors, the law school plans to roll out a revamped business law track by fall 2011, starting with some new courses this fall. Business law is one of eight specialized programs at the school, including environmental, intellectual property and health care law. Co-director Michelle Harner said the university had planned to rebuild its business law program even before the recession hit. But the timing — as the job market remains competitive for new attorneys — "does correspond nicely with the increasing needs of students to be more practice-ready," she said.
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | June 17, 1991
THE NEXT TIME you go into a restaurant, you'll have a good chance of being served by a new breed of starving waiter: the unemployed law student.A local law school career counselor and a recruitment officer at one of Baltimore's largest law firms say opportunities for "summer associates," or interns have dwindled because of the recession.And some law students are complaining that local summer jobs were awarded to blue chip Ivy Leaguers who were chased out of opportunities in their Northeastern cities because of lawyer layoffs.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | December 25, 2007
In the Gulf Coast region of Mississippi where Hurricane Katrina roared through more than two years ago, frustrated homeowners still struggle. Their plight is again attracting the attention of the University of Maryland School of Law. Nearly 80 law students plan to forgo part of their winter vacation next month and chip in on a variety of legal matters affecting hurricane survivors in Louisiana and Mississippi. "What we've heard is that the immediacy of the problem isn't any less now," said Alicia H. Welch, a third-year law student and coordinator of the project.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Derrick Dunn went to jail recently, charged with driving on a suspended license. Under normal circumstances, he would still be in the Baltimore City Detention Center, trying to figure out how to make bail.But a group of law students from the University of Maryland picked up his case and gave him something that most people accused of crimes in Baltimore and throughout the state rarely receive -- legal advice and representation during bail reviews shortly after they are arrested.Dunn is one of almost a dozen people held on nonserious charges who have been released on bail or on personal recognizance because of the month-old project.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 4, 2007
In August, there was just one working phone line at the public defender's office in New Orleans. The broken fax machine sat silent. Even the photocopier stopped copying. It was exactly the kind of post-Hurricane Katrina chaos that attracted the likes of Brigid Ryan. "I jumped at the opportunity even though it was a pretty disturbing experience," said Ryan, a second-year law student at University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore. Inspired by the overwhelming need for legal services for the indigent, Ryan is helping lead a return trip with three dozen students starting Sunday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2005
The morning after Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. was announced as the president's choice for the Supreme Court, students and professors at his alma mater, the Yale Law School, were already hard at work - to defeat him. Professor Bruce Ackerman, who teaches constitutional law here, appeared on CNN with this instant assessment: "I don't think `conservative' is the word. This person is a judicial radical." A group called Law Students Against Alito was formed the same day. "There is a chunk of the population, probably a majority," said Ian Bassin, a founder of the group, "who does not want this guy on the Supreme Court."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 7, 2013
The four announced candidates for attorney general got the opportunity to plead their cases to a tough audience Thursday evening -- law students at the University of Maryland's Carey Law School. With no Republicans running, few differences on issues emerged during a forum attended by the four Democrats in the race -- Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Dels. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County, Jon Cardin of Baltimore County and C. William Frick of Montgomery County.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
When our governor criticized state university law school students for backing the fight against pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, one knew the fix was in - even though the pollution at issue, according to U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson, turned out to be not from some 80,000 chickens but from 42 cows put on the property as the proverbial red herring ("Farmers, Purdue win pollution suit," Dec. 21). The judge covered his tracks in an opinion that insults the common sense of all Marylanders.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Rush Limbaugh is the reigning shock jock of conservative political punditry - insults, outrage and outsized bluster are his stock in trade - so it takes quite an uproar for him to apologize. But that's what he has done at least twice now, if unconvincingly, after calling 30-year-old Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke a "slut" and "prostitute" for testifying to a Congressional panel in favor of the Obama administration's birth control mandate. Last week's personal attack was outrageous, particularly given that Ms. Fluke's testimony was never about her desire to have "recreational sexual activities" as Mr. Limbaugh continued to describe the matter in his on-line apology.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 25, 2012
The O'Malley administration has finally done something in the matter of Mark Farley Grant, the inmate whose plea for clemency - along with an investigative report that established his innocence - went to the Maryland governor 31/2 years ago. Until now, there has been no evidence that eitherMartin O'Malleyor any member of his staff had considered the possibility that Mr. Grant had been convicted wrongly of killing a fellow teenager in Baltimore...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley has revived a simmering political dispute over the University of Maryland law school's role in a lawsuit accusing an Eastern Shore farm and the Perdue poultry company of polluting a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. In a letter that became public Thursday, O'Malley wrote to law school Dean Phoebe Haddon this week to complain about the "ongoing injustice" of the environmental law clinic pursuing "costly litigation of questionable merit"...
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
University of Baltimore administrators announced Wednesday that they would boost the law school's base operating budget by $5 million over the next five years. The agreement comes about 21/2 months after the law school's dean resigned, saying that an outsized amount of program funds was being funneled to other parts of the university. The extra $1 million a year would augment the law school's operating budget by about 5 percent, said Robert L. Bogomolny, the university's president, in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
Fourteen Patterson High School juniors and seniors have blown the whistle on 18 landlords in Northwest Baltimore's Park Heights neighborhood who have not registered their property with the state for lead-paint testing as required for homes built before 1950. The high school students worked on a lead-paint poisoning project with six University of Maryland law students as part of a national youth leadership and advocacy program affiliated with the law school. The students presented their findings Wednesday to university staff and parents at the law school.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
When our governor criticized state university law school students for backing the fight against pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, one knew the fix was in - even though the pollution at issue, according to U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson, turned out to be not from some 80,000 chickens but from 42 cows put on the property as the proverbial red herring ("Farmers, Purdue win pollution suit," Dec. 21). The judge covered his tracks in an opinion that insults the common sense of all Marylanders.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
The University of Baltimore's president issued a sharp response Monday to allegations aired by the university's former law dean after he was forced to resign last week. In an e-mail to faculty and staff, President Robert L. Bogomolny disputed financial arguments used by former dean Phillip Closius to portray a university taking advantage of its law school to support other programs. Bogomolny said he had met with key alumni and faculty members and that "the overwhelming conclusion was that a change in leadership was in the best interests of the School of Law and the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
July 29, 2011
July 29, 2011 To the School of Law Community: At a meeting at 4 o'clock on July 28, University President Robert Bogomolny asked for my resignation as Dean of the School of Law. As of today's date, I have resigned my position as Dean. I truly appreciate the support I have received from the faculty, staff, students and alumni of the School of Law. I write this decanal farewell in order to provide a brief explanation of why I am no longer Dean and to express my gratitude to all of you who welcomed me so warmly to Baltimore.
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