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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 7, 1993
WOULD THAT mine enemy would write a book, the old saying goes. Even better, would that she would write a law review article. If that won't do you in, nothing will.Bill Clinton and I spent last Thursday afternoon reading some of the legal scholarship of Lani Guinier. I read "Keeping the Faith: Black Voters in the Post-Reagan Era" in the Harvard Civil Rights/Civil Liberties Law Review (Spring 1989). I read "No Two Seats: The Elusive Quest for Political Equality" in the Virginia Law Review (November, 1991)
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NEWS
By Francis J. Gorman | January 20, 2013
Inaugurations are more comfortable the second time around. For President Barack Obama and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., it's not likely there will be a repeat in their encore performance of Chief Justice Roberts' flub of the words in the presidential oath mandated by the Constitution. Four years ago, both the president and the chief justice were doing the presidential oath for the first time. In administering the oath, Chief Justice Roberts misplaced the word "faithfully. " The oath is: "I will faithfully execute the office of the president of the United States," but Chief Justice Roberts put "faithfully" after "United States," momentarily throwing the about-to-be president off track.
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NEWS
April 24, 1992
Howard H. Conaway, a retired partner in the law firm of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman, died early yesterday after an apparent heart attack on his way home after visiting friends.Mr. Conaway, who was 82 and lived in the Warrington Condominiums, retired about nine years ago but had remained active in the firm he joined in 1932.A trial lawyer, he was the chief rationing attorney in Maryland for the Office of Price Administration early in World War II before enlisting in the Army.Later, as an Army officer, he was decorated for finding records of the German Alien Property Custodian.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2012
Robert M. Wright, a retired attorney who earned the respect of his peers during his many years in the practice of construction law, died of complications of pulmonary and neurosurgery June 23 at his St. Margaret's home. He was 73. Born in Natick, Mass., he earned a bachelor's degree at Colby College in Maine in 1961, where he played baseball and was a member of an Air Force ROTC program. He then joined the Air Force and served in Vietnam from 1963 to 1964. He was then assigned to Fort Meade, where he met his future wife, Nancy Lucille Watkins, then a resident of Newport News, Va. He moved to Maryland and attended the University of Maryland School of Law, from which he graduated in 1968 and was an editor of its law review.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2003
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Damon Brown feels duped. Like many of his classmates, he came to the Vanderbilt University Law School partly for its racial diversity: Its student body is 13 percent black, a higher proportion than at most other top law schools. Then Brown found out about the law review. The Vanderbilt Law Review - the most prestigious club at the school, and a springboard to the best clerkships and law firms - does not have a single black student among its 60 members. By one count, there have been only four African-Americans among the 750 students selected through its rigorous, merit-based selection process in the past 25 years.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 17, 2006
In the news Represented Mount Vernon-area residents who challenged the Archdiocese of Baltimore's demolition of the Rochambeau, a 100-year-old apartment building at North Charles and West Franklin streets in Baltimore. Occupation Lawyer with Liebmann and Shively. Also executive director of the Calvert Institute for Policy Research. Author of eight nonfiction books, most recently The Common Law Tradition: A Collective Portrait of Five Legal Scholars. Career highlights Came to Baltimore in 1963 as law clerk to Court of Appeals Chief Judge Frederick W. Brune.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Bruce G. Harris, a Baltimore lawyer who was known for his expertise in the fields of banking, real estate and computer law, died Monday of cardiac arrest at North Arundel Hospital. The Millersville resident was 52. Since the 1992 dissolution of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman, where he had worked for 12 years, Mr. Harris had a one-man firm in Redwood Towers in downtown Baltimore. "Attorneys who had dealings with Bruce were always struck by his honesty and low-key style," said Daniel W. Whitney, a longtime friend and a partner in the Towson law firm of Whitney and Bogris.
NEWS
By Norris P. West | February 9, 1992
The Maryland Bar Association calls these the worst of times for young lawyers and law students.Sharon L. Tasman is convinced.She ranks in the top 20 percent of her class at the University of Maryland School of Law. She has studied law in France, and she's an assistant editor of the law review. Her undergraduate grade-point average at UM was 3.9, out of a possible 4.0.In ordinary times, her biggest problem might be deciding which offer to accept. Not in 1992."I've sent out 400 resumes. Literally, 400 resumes," she said recently between classes.
NEWS
By Francis J. Gorman | January 20, 2013
Inaugurations are more comfortable the second time around. For President Barack Obama and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., it's not likely there will be a repeat in their encore performance of Chief Justice Roberts' flub of the words in the presidential oath mandated by the Constitution. Four years ago, both the president and the chief justice were doing the presidential oath for the first time. In administering the oath, Chief Justice Roberts misplaced the word "faithfully. " The oath is: "I will faithfully execute the office of the president of the United States," but Chief Justice Roberts put "faithfully" after "United States," momentarily throwing the about-to-be president off track.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
Howard Conaway, retired partner in law firm, diesHoward H. Conaway, a retired partner in the law firm of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman, died early yesterday after an apparent heart attack on his way home after visiting friends.Mr. Conaway, who was 82 and lived in the Warrington Condominiums, retired about nine years ago but remained active until his death in the firm he joined in 1932.A trial lawyer, he was a member of the International Association ++ of Insurance Counsel, the Defense Research Institute, the Judge Advocate General's Association and the American Judicature Society.
EXPLORE
June 6, 2012
QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY: Blaine Dulkerian of White Hall, bachelor of arts in public relations; and Christina Heilman of Jarrettsville, bachelor of arts in public relations, graduated from Quinnipiac University during the 81st undergraduate commencement exercises May 20. VINCIGUERRA: Damon A. Vinciguerra, of Forest Hill, son of Anthony and Linda Vinciguerra of Forest Hill, graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science in chemical...
FEATURES
By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | December 14, 2007
One would imagine it is something of a bittersweet triumph for an actor to endure long enough to revisit a glory moment from his youth, albeit from the vantage point of an older character. Unlike many of his classically schooled contemporaries in England, it was never in the cards for Michael Caine to ascend from playing King Lear's Edgar, say, to Lear himself. But then how many veterans of the Royal Shakespeare Company can lay claim to having done two film versions of the super-hit stage thriller Sleuth?
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2007
Turn Away thy Son: Little Rock, The Crisis that Shocked the Nation. Elizabeth Jacoway Free Press / 352 pages / $30 On Sept. 3, 1957, hundreds of people assembled across the street from Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. One sang "Dixie" and waved a Confederate flag. Another circulated petitions calling for the dismissal of Superintendent Virgil Blossom, the architect of the plan to comply with the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education by bringing nine black students to the heretofore all-white high school.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 17, 2006
In the news Represented Mount Vernon-area residents who challenged the Archdiocese of Baltimore's demolition of the Rochambeau, a 100-year-old apartment building at North Charles and West Franklin streets in Baltimore. Occupation Lawyer with Liebmann and Shively. Also executive director of the Calvert Institute for Policy Research. Author of eight nonfiction books, most recently The Common Law Tradition: A Collective Portrait of Five Legal Scholars. Career highlights Came to Baltimore in 1963 as law clerk to Court of Appeals Chief Judge Frederick W. Brune.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2003
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Damon Brown feels duped. Like many of his classmates, he came to the Vanderbilt University Law School partly for its racial diversity: Its student body is 13 percent black, a higher proportion than at most other top law schools. Then Brown found out about the law review. The Vanderbilt Law Review - the most prestigious club at the school, and a springboard to the best clerkships and law firms - does not have a single black student among its 60 members. By one count, there have been only four African-Americans among the 750 students selected through its rigorous, merit-based selection process in the past 25 years.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
Come tomorrow, when a federal law will require airlines to screen all checked luggage across the nation, those responsible for enforcement will be watching Baltimore-Washington International Airport. But what they will see there is anyone's guess. For weeks, airlines and airports have been preparing for tomorrow's deadline. Yesterday, Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta announced that his department chose a single concourse at BWI as the template for how luggage screening and other security measures will be handled at 429 airports.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2012
Robert M. Wright, a retired attorney who earned the respect of his peers during his many years in the practice of construction law, died of complications of pulmonary and neurosurgery June 23 at his St. Margaret's home. He was 73. Born in Natick, Mass., he earned a bachelor's degree at Colby College in Maine in 1961, where he played baseball and was a member of an Air Force ROTC program. He then joined the Air Force and served in Vietnam from 1963 to 1964. He was then assigned to Fort Meade, where he met his future wife, Nancy Lucille Watkins, then a resident of Newport News, Va. He moved to Maryland and attended the University of Maryland School of Law, from which he graduated in 1968 and was an editor of its law review.
EXPLORE
June 6, 2012
QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY: Blaine Dulkerian of White Hall, bachelor of arts in public relations; and Christina Heilman of Jarrettsville, bachelor of arts in public relations, graduated from Quinnipiac University during the 81st undergraduate commencement exercises May 20. VINCIGUERRA: Damon A. Vinciguerra, of Forest Hill, son of Anthony and Linda Vinciguerra of Forest Hill, graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science in chemical...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Bruce G. Harris, a Baltimore lawyer who was known for his expertise in the fields of banking, real estate and computer law, died Monday of cardiac arrest at North Arundel Hospital. The Millersville resident was 52. Since the 1992 dissolution of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman, where he had worked for 12 years, Mr. Harris had a one-man firm in Redwood Towers in downtown Baltimore. "Attorneys who had dealings with Bruce were always struck by his honesty and low-key style," said Daniel W. Whitney, a longtime friend and a partner in the Towson law firm of Whitney and Bogris.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
WhoopsLast week in this space, it was incorrectly reported that the legislature's Democratic presiding officers named six legislators to the Task Force to Review the State's Election Law.In fact, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. each named two members to the panel. The remaining two members were appointed by the Republican leadership, Sen. John A. Cade and Del. Robert H. Kittleman.It only took six months, but Gov. Parris N. Glendening today will announce his seven appointees to the Task Force to Review the State's Election Law -- a panel created through emergency legislation this year in the Maryland General Assembly.
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