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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
When University of Maryland law professor Larry Gibson was asked to become involved with the Liberian presidential campaign of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, he initially declined. But she ultimately won him over, and his efforts helped her become Africa's first elected female head of state in 2005. Gibson was therefore elated when he heard that Sirleaf had become one of three recipients for this year's Nobel Peace Prize, along with fellow Liberian activist Leymah Gbowee and Yemeni activist Tawakkul Karman.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Richard W. "Dick" Bourne, a colorful longtime University of Baltimore law professor who retired earlier this year, died July 12 of pancreatic cancer at his Pylesville farm. He was 71. "He was a wonderful colleague and one of those special men who told you what they thought with good will and a twinkle in their eye," said Robert L. Bogomolny, who recently retired as president of the University of Baltimore. "He retained Southern speech patterns and had extraordinarily good values, and cared deeply about his students and the school," said Dr. Bogomolny.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 14, 2001
Eric Green, a Boston University law professor and a specialist in the field of resolving disputes out of court, has been named as the mediator in the Microsoft antitrust case. The order from Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly was issued late Friday and received by parties in the case yesterday morning. Her order came after Microsoft, the Justice Department and the 18 states who have joined the suit failed to reach a settlement by the Oct. 12 deadline set by Kollar-Kotelly. Green is a recognized expert in a branch of the law known as alternative dispute resolution, or finding ways to settle legal conflicts outside the courtroom.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 6, 2014
Let me present a hypothetical situation that gets to the heart of the Supreme Court's unfortunate decision on prayer at local government meetings. I'll make the setting Carroll County because that's where elected officials eagerly invoke Jesus Christ at meetings of the Board of County Commissioners. Let's say you own a piece of property in some increasingly suburbanized section of the county. You want it rezoned so you can build a convenience store and gas station. You have to convince the commissioners that the area has changed enough to warrant rezoning.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2001
Stanley S. Herr, a University of Maryland law professor who helped establish the federal law requiring appropriate public education for disabled children, died yesterday of adrenal cancer at his residence in Homeland. He was 56. For nearly two decades he taught civil rights, human rights and clinical legal education. He helped write the 1989 Maryland law that prohibits the execution of criminals identified as mentally retarded. He also submitted a brief that was cited by the Supreme Court in abolishing the death penalty for the mentally retarded.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
In a city where leaders have for years tried and failed to curtail one of the nation's highest crime rates, a University of Maryland law professor has turned his classroom into a crime-fighting think tank. Professor Orde F. Kittrie is challenging his 13 students this semester to come up with workable ideas for making Baltimore and the rest of Maryland a safer place to live. The proposals, due in the form of term papers, are not destined for burial in a dusty file cabinet, the product of mere intellectual exercise.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1996
William I. Weston, a University of Baltimore law professor known among local attorneys for his sharp-tongued advocacy of causes ranging from mandatory continuing legal education to attorney discipline, plans to leave the law school next year to join a new school in Jacksonville, Fla.Mr. Weston will become associate dean of Florida Coastal Law School in May 1997, ending 22 years on the UB faculty.The lure of the new job is Florida Coastal's unusual curriculum, Mr. Weston said, one that will give greater emphasis practical lawyering skills and less to traditional academic teachings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2010
Royal Graham "The House" Shannonhouse III, a retired attorney and University of Baltimore law school professor who was a beloved taskmaster and had a profound influence on his fledgling law students, died in his sleep Friday at his Federal Hill home. He was 81. "He was the quintessential law professor who inspired his students to be the best lawyers they could be, and his influence continues on in us 40 years later after we left his classroom," U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James F. Schneider said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
KENNETH Lasson is that rare bird: a law professor who writes well and amusingly. What's more, the University of Baltimore professor uses his considerable skill to skewer fellow academics. He does it delightfully and delightedly, relishing the howls of protest from those on the receiving end. In his new book, Trembling in the Ivory Tower: Excesses in the Pursuit of Truth and Tenure, Lasson takes aim at the hundreds of law journals -- more than 800 at last count -- that exist primarily to publish abstruse, overly long and overly footnoted essays by junior faculty seeking tenure in the publish-or-perish world of higher education.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
The way Rena Steinzor sees it, the nationwide egg recall, the Gulf oil spill, the lead discovered in children's toys, Toyota cars suddenly accelerating — these incidents are all related. Steinzor, a University of Maryland law professor and author, contends that the recalls and catastrophes all stem from a systemic regulatory breakdown in the U.S. She and Sidney A. Shapiro of Wake Forest University just published the book, "The People's Agents and the Battle to Protect the American Public: Special Interests, Government, and Threats to Health, Safety, and The Environment.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
A group of Catonsville nuns who claimed that the new federal health care law's contraceptive coverage requirement would violate their religious beliefs are actually exempt from the mandate, a U.S. district judge concluded Friday. The Little Sisters of the Poor operates St. Martin's Home in Catonsville and about 30 other homes for the poor and elderly across the country, including in Colorado, where the federal lawsuit was filed on their behalf in September by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
During a weekend gathering of black alumni from the University of Maryland Law School in which the continuing inequalities faced by African-Americans was discussed, one participant called for Baltimore to preserve the city's tradition of public pools. UM law professor Taunya Lovell Banks presented Saturday new work on the civil rights history of swimming in Baltimore and questioned whether Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is doing enough to keep the pools open and available. "Like mayors before her, when it's time to do budget cuts, the first think they look at are parks," said Banks.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 13, 2013
A dozen years ago, as President George W. Bush was beginning to build his case for invading Iraq, a key Justice Department lawyer argued forcefully before a Senate subcommittee that the president had the power as commander-in-chief to wage war without going to Congress. John Yoo, a deputy assistant attorney general, declared that the president was "the sole organ of the federal government in the field of international relations," rather gratuitously adding that "we would be willing to act with congressional support.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 9, 2013
The young Barack Obama's early enthusiasm for anti-war progressivism is well chronicled in his autobiography. Friendships with the likes of anti-war activists/bombers Bill Ayers and wife Bernardine Dohrn, poet Frank Marshall Davis, and the notorious Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and brief stints as a public interest lawyer, law professor, and community activist deepened his appreciation for leftist thought - and action. Indeed, the young senator from Illinois rode intense criticism of Bush-era foreign policy adventures and domestic surveillance practices all the way to the White House.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
An Anne Arundel County woman has filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against more than 180 defendants who she says circulated or watched child pornography showing her two young children being molested by their father and another person. In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the woman is unnamed to shield the identity of the youngsters, who were ages 4 and 6 at the time they were sexually assaulted, the suit says. The suit claims the father and another person pleaded guilty to federal charges in connection with production of child pornography and were sentenced to 45 and 36 years in prison.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- However wide the disagreement about President Bush's legal power to send U.S. troops into combat without Congress' advance approval, there seems to be next to no one arguing seriously that he must ask anyone else in the world for formal permission.Leaving aside any diplomatic or political necessities that Mr. Bush might have to meet before going to war, several legal experts of widelydiffering views agreed yesterday that no further legal authority must be sought, from the U.N. Security Council or from any allies, for an attack on Iraq.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 13, 2003
Nike Inc., the world's largest maker of athletic shoes, agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle a California consumer's lawsuit that tested the limits of corporate free speech. The settlement resolves claims that Nike lied in a public relations campaign responding to allegations that its shoes were made in overseas sweatshops. In his suit, Mark Kasky contended the campaign violated a California truth-in-advertising law, while Nike argued that its public statements were constitutionally protected.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Katherine L. Vaughns, a University of Maryland School of Law professor and secretary of the Center Stage board who immersed herself in the arts community, died of pancreatic cancer May 4 at a Sinai Hospital hospice unit. The Bolton Hill resident was 68. "She was a great, great citizen of Baltimore," said Jed Dietz, director of the Maryland Film Festival. "We dedicated the opening night of the Maryland Film Festival to her. She was the most perfect board member. She did more than you asked, often before you asked.
NEWS
By Larry S. Gibson | June 15, 2012
I am not a friend of Julius Henson. Most often, Mr. Henson and I have been political enemies. I have not seen him or spoken with him for several years. But I wish to express my view that what is happening to him is unjust and a threat to democracy. I received one of his robocalls on election night in 2010, and I found it offensive and reprehensible. The calls were misleading, and were clearly intended to suggest that people need not go out and vote. Nevertheless, it dangerous to our society, and particularly to minority communities, to begin criminalizing political statements, even those that are false and misleading.
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