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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
  Primetime TV often weaves high-profile, real-life events into its narratives, and on Wednesday's episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," the scandal involving former Ravens running back Ray Rice will be the latest headline to receive fictionalized treatment.  Based on the above preview, the episode, titled "American Disgrace," appears to deal with rape and a cover-up involving a celebrity pro-athlete named Shakir "The Shark"...
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
  Primetime TV often weaves high-profile, real-life events into its narratives, and on Wednesday's episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," the scandal involving former Ravens running back Ray Rice will be the latest headline to receive fictionalized treatment.  Based on the above preview, the episode, titled "American Disgrace," appears to deal with rape and a cover-up involving a celebrity pro-athlete named Shakir "The Shark"...
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By Chris Kaltenbach | July 23, 1997
One of last season's strongest episodes of the woefully underappreciated "Law & Order" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) gets a repeat airing on NBC tonight.Sam Waterston shines in the conclusion of a three-parter that had the detectives and prosecutors scurrying between the East and West Coasts to find the killer of a female movie executive whose body is fished out of a New York river.Tonight's conclusion offers Waterston plenty of chances to bemoan the media circus the trial has become (any similarities to the O. J. case are purely intentional)
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens cornerback Jimmy Smith has been assigned an Oct. 7 court date at Towson District Court for his misdemeanor disorderly conduct case, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Shawn Vinson. Smith was charged with failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer on July 12 when he was arrested by police and given a citation following an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson. According to Maryland criminal law code Section 10-201 governing disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct, which includes willfully failing to obey a reasonable and lawful order from a law enforcement officer, those convicted of violating this law are subject to a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail or a fine not exceeding $500, or both penalties.
FEATURES
By Jane Hall and Jane Hall,Los Angeles Times | August 21, 1991
NEW YORK -- Like the city where it is filmed, "Law & Order" has a lot going against it.NBC's realistic cops-and-lawyers series is a serious one-hour drama at a time when one-hour dramas are considered an endangered species by TV studios because they are expensive to produce and harder to sell in syndication than half-hour sitcoms. It is also the only weekly broadcast TV drama being filmed in New York City.In contrast to the days when "Naked City," "The Defenders" and other weekly series called New York home, the city today has a reputation among producers as a nice place to visit (for a few exterior shots to give an authentic feel to the story)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1994
Life precedes art: Last week Michael Moriarty, who plays a district attorney on NBC's "Law & Order," handed in his resignation from that series. Tonight on that series, Claire Kincaid (played by Jill Hennessy), another district attorney on "Law & Order," hands in her resignation as part of the plot.* "The Critic" (8:30-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- For obvious reasons, I enjoy this new animated series a great deal. Aside from the overweight and balding parts, "The Critic" gets a lot of it right -- including my favorite little subtle touch, the fact that critic Jay Sherman (voiced by Jon Lovitz)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 13, 1990
"Law & Order" is not a bad idea: It's half police drama, half courtroom drama.RTC NBC uses the term "two-tiered drama" to describe the new show, which premieres at 10 tonight on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). Tier one is a team of detectives solving a crime. Tier two is a team of assistant district attorneys punishing the criminal. Crime and punishment."Law & Order" certainly has the police-drama look. Big-city, neon-lit nights on the streets; plastic foam cups, scarred metal desks, harsh overhead lighting at the precinct house.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | August 27, 1991
The quick take on the last TV season, once "Cop Rock" and company bit the dust, was that new and innovative were out, the tried and true were in. There were no new hit shows. Ratings were dominated by the old and venerable.While the spring appearance of "Northern Exposure" on CBS brought a welcome breeze, during the entire season, every Tuesday night on NBC, one show swam relatively unnoticed against the tide of mediocrity.That would be "Law & Order," which also bucked the trend against quality hour dramas surviving the flood of half-hour comedies.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 5, 2005
"In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups -- the police who investigate crime, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories." I HOPED WHEN SUMMER came and the days grew longer, I would be cured. That my days and nights huddled under an afghan in the basement would be over. That the blue glow of the TV screen on my pallid face would be replaced by the warmth of the sun. That I would leave the house, see people, engage the world outside the small screen.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | November 24, 2013
Chris Meloni -- of "Law & Order: SVU" and "True Blood" fame -- was in town this weekend, according to his Twitter account ( @Chris_Meloni ).  Meloni's visit may have flown under the radar, but he took time out to trade tweets with fellow TV actor and noted Ravens fan Josh Charles ( @MrJoshCharles ).  Charles -- a Baltimore native who stars in the CBS drama "The Good Wife" wrote Meloni: "Why are you in Baltimore? The people want to know. "  Meloni coyly replied: "Top secret assignment ... " A little later Meloni teases Charles with the line: "Tired of getting kicked outta the Balto bars, have stopped using ur name.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Jimmy Smith knew what was on everybody's mind. So before the assembled reporters could ask him a question, Smith had one of his own. “Can I start off?,” he asked as he settled behind a microphone outside the Ravens' practice facility following the second full-squad workout Friday. The floor was his. “The incident that occurred is still a legal matter so I'm not able to discuss that right now,” Smith said in his first public comments since his July 12 arrest for misdemeanor disorderly conduct.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Ravens starting cornerback Jimmy Smith was arrested and charged with misdemeanor disorderly conduct Saturday night after an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson, according to Baltimore County police. Police said Smith, 25, was cited for failure to obey a lawful order of a police officer. Ravens team officials are aware of the incident involving Smith. "We're gathering information about this," Ravens senior vice president of public and community relations Kevin Byrne said.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | November 24, 2013
Chris Meloni -- of "Law & Order: SVU" and "True Blood" fame -- was in town this weekend, according to his Twitter account ( @Chris_Meloni ).  Meloni's visit may have flown under the radar, but he took time out to trade tweets with fellow TV actor and noted Ravens fan Josh Charles ( @MrJoshCharles ).  Charles -- a Baltimore native who stars in the CBS drama "The Good Wife" wrote Meloni: "Why are you in Baltimore? The people want to know. "  Meloni coyly replied: "Top secret assignment ... " A little later Meloni teases Charles with the line: "Tired of getting kicked outta the Balto bars, have stopped using ur name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Country music might have a history of making its women play by the rules. But Miranda Lambert has made a career of speaking her mind. Lambert's effortless ability to break your heart one moment (the Grammy-winning ballad "The House That Built Me") and find glee in revenge the next ("Kerosene," a song about Lambert burning down her cheating boyfriend's house, would make her hero Loretta Lynn proud) that makes her one of country music's most vital talents. "Four the Record," her latest album released in November, finds the 28-year-old newlywed (she married fellow country star Blake Shelton last May)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 29, 2011
Baltimore's Carmelo Anthony and fellow NBA player Chris Bosh made cameos an episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" on Wednesday night. I think it's safe to say both will soon be placing Emmys next to the Olympic gold medals in their trophy cases. In case you missed it, here's a clip of Carmelo reading his lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Sun TV Critic | February 28, 2010
A fter a desperately needed Olympic interlude, NBC gets back this week to the down-and-dirty business of trying to recover from the debacle of moving Jay Leno to prime time in September. Mercifully, the Vancouver Games, which end tonight, took the minds of many viewers off the NBC decision that sent a bloodied Leno back to 11:35 p.m. starting Monday, while Conan O'Brien was sent off to a very early $40 million retirement earlier this month. Of all the things that the beleaguered network must do the minute the Olympic flame is extinguished, nothing is more important than re-establishing itself as a viable viewing option at 10 p.m. weeknights, so that affiliates like Baltimore's WBAL-TV have at least a fighting chance to compete in late local news again.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 13, 1990
"Law & Order" looks like a very good television series that i almost a great one, ultimately robbed of that lofty status by its own ambition.The idea, which executive producer Dick Wolf has had kicking around the networks for several years, is to follow one criminal case from the crime, through the investigation to the arrest, into the legal system, through the trial to the verdict.Essentially, "Law & Order," which was made on location in New York for NBC, is two half-hour shows (indeed it might be syndicated as a half-hour drama)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 19, 2005
Dick Wolf is at it again. The powerful producer last week abruptly wrote out one Law & Order character - Assistant District Attorney Serena Southerlyn (Elisabeth Rohm) - and tonight will write in another, Assistant District Attorney Alexandra Borgia (Annie Parisse). As fans of the 15- year-old NBC series know, such turnover is nothing new; after all, he's done it 14 times before. As Wolf once said: "The play's the thing - the writing is what matters most - and every actor who comes to the show knows it."
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | September 13, 2009
At first, it seemed unlikely to provide much inspiration - a drunken prank in a city where there's usually much better fodder for the man I've come to think of as the Bard of Baltimore Badness. But I was wrong. Even so amateur a crime as the heist of the Cal Ripken Jr. No. 8 statue at Camden Yards - conducted right under a security camera by hapless perps who would be caught almost immediately - managed to serve as muse for the master. Soon, we had an addition to his ever-growing canon, the always expanding compendium of his art. Call it the ineffable poetry of Frederick H. Bealefeld III. We may know him today as Baltimore's police commissioner, the white-haired, dark eye-browed, Bawlmer-accented cop's cop. But surely future scholars will come to appreciate his unrecognized literary genius, the found art of his pronouncements, the lyricism of his inadvertent verses.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
The tang of good old-fashioned Westerns only improves with time. Appaloosa, a story of two lawmen who clean up the title town at some personal cost, goes down like a single-malt aged for 25 years - since that last defiantly traditional big-screen Western, Fred Schepisi's Barbarosa (1982). This one has the sweeping backdrop of New Mexico and the snap of a trampoline. Ed Harris, who directed and co-wrote it with Robert Knott from Robert B. Parker's novel, also stars as a lawman named Virgil Cole.
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