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NEWS
January 26, 1992
If the Supreme Court upholds Pennsylvania's new restrictions on abortions this summer, it probably will not do so in a way that changes the legal situation in Maryland. But it may.In Maryland, restrictive abortion laws written in the 1960s are on the books but have been ruled unconstitutional as long as Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision, is still in effect. The most likely outcome in the Pennsylvania case is that the court will uphold that state's laws in a way that leaves Roe's finding of a woman's abortion rights intact and fairly broadly defined.
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EXPLORE
February 28, 2013
Over 2,000 people - 38 of them children - have been killed by guns in America since the massacre at Newtown two months ago. The U.S. firearm homicide rate is 20 times greater than other high-income countries. We have brought down the death toll from cars, toys and medications through careful study and thoughtful legislation - why can't we do this with guns? Taking steps to keep guns out of the wrong hands doesn't violate the second amendment any more than prohibitions against shouting "fire" in a crowded theater violate the first amendment.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
John Dortch, who was convicted of second-degree murder in the death of a police officer during an attempted robbery of a Washington bank in 1974, is not the first former convict to apply for a license to practice law in Maryland.The Maryland Court of Appeals voted 4-3 to allow Gerald L. Shipley of Washington to practice law in 1982, despite his conviction for driving a getaway car in an Oct. 8, 1967, armed robbery of a Baltimore bank, according to court records.Shipley served six years in a federal prison before earning a degree from Morgan State University and being admitted to the University of Maryland Law School.
NEWS
By Carl Tobias | November 30, 2008
In the summer of 2000, Francis Murnaghan, a highly respected Baltimore jurist, died after rendering more than two decades of distinguished service on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Since then, no one has been appointed to his seat. Because that long-standing vacancy deprives Maryland of representation on the court and erodes the delivery of justice, President-elect Barack Obama must expeditiously name a highly qualified replacement. The Fourth Circuit now has vacancies in four of the 15 judgeships authorized for the tribunal, which serves as the court of last resort for 99 percent of appeals filed in Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
For one sentence in the Maryland Constitution, the 39 words explaining the qualifications for attorney general are a tricky business. Thanks to the Court of Appeals, it's unlikely we've heard the last on the subject, too. In a 72-page opinion filed Monday (counting the extra 32 pages of concurring opinion, that's an average 2 2/3 pages per constitutional word), the court made a bad situation worse. Voters may recall that the brouhaha began when a question arose whether then-Montgomery County Councilman Thomas E. Perez met the constitutional requirements to be Maryland attorney general.
NEWS
July 18, 2004
Medical liability laws should be reformed The selection of Sen. John Edwards as the Democrat vice presidential candidate highlights an issue that needs to be addressed here in Maryland. Edwards is a multimillionaire trial lawyer. Before entering politics, he sued people for a living. Some argue that trial lawyers represent the little guy against the powerful. But how does it help the little guy to drive medical doctors out of business. Where will we take our children when they are sick?
FEATURES
June 27, 1998
150 years ago in The Sun June 27: LYNCH LAW IN MARYLAND -- A man at Leonardtown, while intoxicated, beat his wife severely last week, on hearing which several citizens arrested him, took him to an adjacent house, and, after a short trial, found him guilty, and sentenced him to be ducked in the bay. He was repeatedly thrown overboard from a boat, with a rope around his waist, until thoroughly sobered.100 years ago in The Sun July 2: A baby camel was born late Thursday night in the camel pen at Druid Hill Park, and both the mother, Jennie, and baby are doing finely.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
An Anne Arundel County circuit judge said yesterday he will quickly decide whether Democrat Douglas F. Gansler has enough experience practicing law in Maryland to qualify as a candidate for attorney general. Judge Ronald A. Silkworth held a hearing yesterday on a lawsuit filed last week by a college student from Bowie contending Gansler has practiced in Maryland only the eight years he has been Montgomery County state's attorney - two years short of the 10 required. Gansler argues he is qualified because has been a member of the Maryland bar for 17 years.
NEWS
August 14, 2001
GUNS ARE made to kill. So people who have these deadly weapons also have the highest responsibility to keep them out of children's hands. That has been the law in Maryland for nine years. But it hasn't been used successfully, even in the aftermath of accidental shootings involving children. The latest incident, a Howard County 3-year-old who shot himself with his father's loaded, unlocked handgun, highlights the deficiency in the law that has challenged prosecutors since its passage. The ambiguity of the law's wording is the problem.
NEWS
May 27, 2001
FIRST, SOME credit. President Bush's renomination of Judge Roger L. Gregory to the federal appeals court was a splendid gesture that could help stop the bloodletting in the judicial-selection slugfest his fellow Republicans started eight years ago. Judge Gregory had been named to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals bench by President Clinton through a recess appointment, after GOP senators held up his nomination, as they did with so many of the former...
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2008
As details emerged about three youngsters apparently drowned by their father in a downtown hotel room over the weekend, legal experts and family advocates questioned whether Maryland law goes far enough to protect children in custody disputes. Some argue that judges are too quick to dismiss women's claims of abuse and too willing to award unsupervised visitation - even if one parent has a history of mental illness or battering the other. Amy Castillo, whose estranged husband, Mark Castillo, allegedly confessed to the killings, said in court documents that her husband had threatened to make her suffer by killing their children.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
For one sentence in the Maryland Constitution, the 39 words explaining the qualifications for attorney general are a tricky business. Thanks to the Court of Appeals, it's unlikely we've heard the last on the subject, too. In a 72-page opinion filed Monday (counting the extra 32 pages of concurring opinion, that's an average 2 2/3 pages per constitutional word), the court made a bad situation worse. Voters may recall that the brouhaha began when a question arose whether then-Montgomery County Councilman Thomas E. Perez met the constitutional requirements to be Maryland attorney general.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
An Anne Arundel County circuit judge said yesterday he will quickly decide whether Democrat Douglas F. Gansler has enough experience practicing law in Maryland to qualify as a candidate for attorney general. Judge Ronald A. Silkworth held a hearing yesterday on a lawsuit filed last week by a college student from Bowie contending Gansler has practiced in Maryland only the eight years he has been Montgomery County state's attorney - two years short of the 10 required. Gansler argues he is qualified because has been a member of the Maryland bar for 17 years.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Just days after opponents of early voting took their case to the state's highest court, Democratic leaders shot back yesterday - announcing a campaign to encourage voters to take advantage of Maryland's new but contested law that allows some polling places to open for five days before Election Day. "While the legal fight may very well continue, I think it's incumbent upon all of us to prepare the electorate to take advantage of this law that has been...
NEWS
July 18, 2004
Medical liability laws should be reformed The selection of Sen. John Edwards as the Democrat vice presidential candidate highlights an issue that needs to be addressed here in Maryland. Edwards is a multimillionaire trial lawyer. Before entering politics, he sued people for a living. Some argue that trial lawyers represent the little guy against the powerful. But how does it help the little guy to drive medical doctors out of business. Where will we take our children when they are sick?
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
Maryland is cracking down harder on drinking and driving with a pair of laws that go into effect today -- one that makes it illegal to have open alcohol containers in vehicles and another that establishes tougher penalties for repeat drunken drivers. A third law aimed at drunken drivers that will take effect tomorrow makes it a felony for any driver to flee the scene of an accident in which someone is seriously injured or killed. "Crossing a street or driving down a highway should not be a death-defying act," said Del. William A. Bronrott, a Montgomery County Democrat who sponsored one of the laws during this year's General Assembly session.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
Howard County Del. Virginia Thomas seems certain she can get the 1994 General Assembly to pass a statewide ban on smoking in public places.While we may not yet share her optimism, we commend her for her persistent fight against the deadly effects of second-hand smoke.How deadly? A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that "secondary" tobacco fumes annually cause 3,000 lung cancer deaths among non-smokers and up to 300,000 cases of bronchitis and pneumonia in children.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Just days after opponents of early voting took their case to the state's highest court, Democratic leaders shot back yesterday - announcing a campaign to encourage voters to take advantage of Maryland's new but contested law that allows some polling places to open for five days before Election Day. "While the legal fight may very well continue, I think it's incumbent upon all of us to prepare the electorate to take advantage of this law that has been...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
The Rev. Joyce A. Barton Davis, who served as pastor of a church, maintained a legal practice and worked as a Social Security Administration appeals officer, died Oct. 20 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Lochearn resident was 54. At her death, Mrs. Davis had been pastor for 15 months at historic Melville Chapel United Methodist Church in Elkridge, founded in 1772. "She was a wonderful lady. We're an all-white congregation, and she was a black, but she came in and took charge. She loved everyone, and we loved her in return," said Liz Heinbauch, a longtime parishioner.
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