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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 13, 2014
Edward Hopkins, a retired lieutenant with the Harford County Sheriff's Office who has been its chief spokesman for the last year and a half, has been appointed chief deputy, effective July 1. Hopkins will replace Col. Greg Carlevaro, who is retiring to become a college professor, according to Sheriff Jesse Bane. Bane announced the Hopkins appointment at the Harford County Council meeting Tuesday evening. "Eddie has everything I am looking for in the chief deputy position," Bane said in a phone interview after the meeting.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
A federal appeals judge recently took aim at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' use of fictitious drug robbery schemes to secure lengthy prison sentences for would-be rip off crews, strongly criticizing the practice in a written opinion. The so-called reverse stings follow a pattern: An informant or undercover agent poses as a disgruntled courier and invites a group of people to rob his employer of a half-million dollars or so worth of drugs. But Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote that such tactics raise important issues about wealth inequality in the United States and whom authorities decide to pursue.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and By Jessica Anderson | May 10, 2014
A man fatally shot by FBI agents outside an Owings Mills Sam's Club last month was a known Black Guerrilla Family gang member under surveillance in a federal narcotics investigation, according to a Baltimore County police report. FBI agents were secretly watching Jameel Kareem Ofurum Harrison, 34, who had attempted to buy illegal drugs when the agents tried to stop his car on April 11 on Reisterstown Road, the report says. Authorities from the FBI and Baltimore County police have said little about the afternoon shooting and have not explained what led the agents to open fire on the car. The police report adds some details about why police were targeting Harrison but does not explain the shooting.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
Writing as a retired street cop and a fierce enforcer of DUI laws, I am appalled that my colleagues in Maryland are not already trained to detect, test and arrest for non-alcohol DUI ( "Authorities worried about drugged driving after new pot law takes effect," May 4). In Michigan, we learned such things when I was a rookie in the 1970s. Or were Frederick County State's Attorney Charles Smith and Montgomery County Police Chief Thomas Manger mistaken or just trying to scare folks? Certainly, we have seen a drastic increase in driving and fatal accidents caused by drivers who took too much Oxycodone, Vicodin and other serious pain killers.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 8, 2014
The Harford County State's Attorney's Office recently honored top area law enforcement officers who made outstanding drunk and drugged driving arrests in 2013. The annual award ceremony was held April 30 in the Harford County Courthouse's ceremonial courtroom. The ceremony also recognized Drug Recognition Experts, or DREs, who are instrumental in arrests of drugged drivers. "Our law enforcement officers are the best in their efforts to maintain safety on the county's roads," Harford State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly said in statement.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The Baltimore County Police Department will accept prescription medications at multiple locations on Saturday as part of a program intended to get unused and potentially dangerous drugs out of homes. The initiative, run in tandem with the Drug Enforcement Administration, will collect prescriptions from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Those dropping off medications will not be required to show ID or answer questions. Officials will not accept illicit drugs or syringes. Law enforcement will accept the drugs at three locations: 6424 Windsor Mill Road, Woodlawn; 111 Wight Avenue, Cockeysville; and, 1747 Merritt Boulevard, Baltimore.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2014
As a crime summit approaches and a survey finds public mistrust of police, the beat goes on for one Northern District officer who patrols the crime-prone Pen Lucy area. "It's the passion that I have," said Officer Edwin Albino, 37, of Edgewood, a nearly eight-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department and a Puerto Rico state police officer before that. "As soon as I wake up in the morning and put my uniform on, there is a sense of pride. I will work in any (police) district, because I'm representing Baltimore City police.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
On March 20, police in Washington issued an Amber Alert for missing 8-year-old Relisha Rudd, alerting residents that the girl could be traveling with a suspected abductor. Washington police said they asked law enforcement agencies across the region to extend the alert. But Maryland officials say they never got the request, though some of the initial search for the girl centered in neighboring Prince George's County. "The bottom line is this: The Maryland State Police have never been asked to issue an Amber Alert in this case," said spokesman Gregory M. Shipley.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
While Dan Rodricks ' column was unfairly derisive in its characterization of Maryland's police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors who oppose the legalization of marijuana, he did state one undeniable truth: The legalization of marijuana will mean that more people will smoke pot ( "Pot fears expose fears about societal health," Feb. 27). They will smoke marijuana in order to get high and then get into cars and trucks and drive on our highways. Marijuana is a potent drug with a proven connection to aggressive behavior.
NEWS
By Greg Kline | February 26, 2014
The Maryland General Assembly yesterday held an extensive set of hearings on a variety of bills dealing with marijuana.  The bills varied from outright legalization to various decriminalization options. Much of the debate was predictable, but a few changes to the script did appear.   Law enforcement and prosecutors from around the state rallied in Annapolis to testify against legalization and many of the reform efforts.  This overwhelmed the couple of retired law enforcement officers who legalization advocates have been touting as representative of the law enforcement community's willingness to surrender their efforts at drug enforcement.
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