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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Several hundred Baltimore and state police officers will be saturating the city's bar districts this St. Patrick's Day weekend, looking for drunken drivers and people drinking in the streets, law enforcement officials announced Thursday. "Roadways in and around Baltimore will be heavily patrolled," Baltimore police patrol commander Col. Garnell Green said. "Plan ahead. Have a designated driver. Know where you're going to park and expect large crowds. " Maryland Transportation Administration Police and Maryland State Police are teaming with city officers on a crackdown of rowdy behavior that plagued Canton Square last year, when residents complained of scores of people drinking openly outside bars, breaking glass and leaving trash strewn all around.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | June 19, 2012
The recent crash of a $176 million Navy drone in a Chesapeake Bay marsh highlights a number of brewing issues over the domestic use of this new technology. Over the past decade, since the United States' invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan and framed by the Bush and Obama administrations' war on terror, the use of drones as both a surveillance tool and a means to kill insurgents has increased. This is a story about effective law enforcement, proper training, the associated costs - and the deadly consequences, intentional or not. Although there was some public consternation last year regarding the use of drones (also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 19, 1998
It was, to paraphrase one commentator's apt reaction, a sneak attack on liberty.Earlier this month, in the legislative dead of night, Congress gave law enforcement unprecedented new power to wiretap your communications.You can argue whether this particular expansion of wiretapping authority, called the "roving wiretap" in law-enforcement circles, is a good or bad idea. However you feel about it, you should be outraged that a few members of Congress, cowed by the FBI and indifferent to your privacy, sneaked this provision without debate or voting on its merits.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2005
HILLSBORO, Mo. - The detectives were relaxing over fried pork rinds when they saw a car turn into the driveway of the farmhouse they had just raided. The car rattled past the Confederate flag, heading for the overgrown yard where several addicts had been cranking out the illegal drug methamphetamine. The detectives exchanged glances. They ducked behind a truck. When the car stopped and the driver got out, they rushed him. "Randy!" cried Detective Darin Kerwin in mock surprise. "I thought you were trying to clean up."
NEWS
January 23, 1998
WHO IS JAMES N. ROBEY? That is the question Howard County's former police chief will have to answer as local Democrats line up behind him for the race for county executive.This we know: Mr. Robey grew up in the community of Daniels near Patapsco Valley State Park. He joined the police force in 1966, when it had 32 members, and rose through the ranks. He has earned a bachelor's degree in criminal justice, a master's degree in administration and management and graduated from the FBI's National Academy.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
As the investigation into Violet R. Ripken's abduction stretched into an eighth day, police remained silent Wednesday about their leads - a strategy Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said could ensure the potential suspect doesn't destroy evidence or intimidate witnesses. Investigators on the 40-person Aberdeen police force, Cassilly said, must find a balance in publicly releasing details that will help solve the case but will not provide any advantage to the man believed to have abducted the 74-year-old mother of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. and widow of former manager Cal Ripken Sr. "I hope that we're successful; that's all I say," Cassilly said.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
For nearly 22 years, Timothy P. McNally has had a storied run at the FBI.Chasing drug smugglers and money launderers in Miami. Handling the criminal case against former Illinois Rep. Dan Rostenkowski. Supervising corruption probes, white-collar fraud cases and narcotics investigations in Baltimore.But McNally's run is far from over.After heading the Maryland-Delaware division for the past two years, the FBI agent with the ready smile and sharp wit has been assigned to supervise the FBI's second-largest division in the nation, after o New York.
NEWS
By Kristine Beckerle, Deborah Francois and Babur Khwaja | August 28, 2014
Police in Faisalabad, Pakistan's third largest city, tortured more than 1,400 people during a six-year period, according to a report researched and written by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School, for Justice Project Pakistan (JPP), a non-governmental organization based in Lahore, Pakistan. The report, which we authored, documents how law enforcement uses its power to inflict pain largely with impunity. Police beat detainees, hang them by their arms or feet for hours on end, force them to witness the torture of others, and strip them naked and parade them in public.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
As outrage grows across the country about the shooting of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin in Florida, a Baltimore case with some similar themes could come back into the spotlight this week: the trial of two members of a community patrol organization in Northwest Baltimore accused of assaulting a black teenager. The incident occurred in November 2010, with charges brought against Eliyahu Werdesheim in December and, later, against his brother, Avi. There are some parallels - vigilantism, race, and self-defense - but also major differences - most notably the fatal outcome in the Florida case but also the handling by law enforcement.
NEWS
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 30, 2005
McALLEN, Texas - An already tense situation along the border worsened yesterday as an internal FBI memo warned that a ruthless Mexican drug cartel could be plotting to kidnap and murder U.S. federal law enforcement agents. Although the plot specifically targets two unidentified agents of the FBI, the bulletin warns that "due to the nature of this immediate threat, all law enforcement personnel are being cautioned to ensure appropriate measures are taken as well as to keep a high degree of vigilance."
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