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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2002
Westminster Police Department will give up to 10 people inside access to local law enforcement starting tonight, when it offers its first Citizen Police Academy. For the next nine Tuesday nights, local businesspeople and others in the class will get a primer on the department's history and structure and law enforcement techniques such as conducting arrests and self-defense. In the three-hour sessions, they will try on the accessories officers wear: bulletproof vests, gun belts and handcuffs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 1, 1999
In a society where compromise is a pillar of government, it feels almost un-American to acknowledge that some issues defy any middle ground. It feels even worse when there are only two alternatives, and both offer unpleasant consequences.This is the reality of encryption, the scrambling of data to keep it away from prying eyes. Yet at a time when it's essential to hold an honest debate about a difficult decision, encryption policy drifts in a Twilight Zone, where both sides tend to avoid acknowledging some hard truths.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GEOFFREY C. UPTON and GEOFFREY C. UPTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 6, 1998
In 1986, Chicago's El Rukn street gang struck a deal with Libya to commit terrorist attacks against American planes and buildings.Informed of the plot, FBI agents tapped the gang's phones, gathered information and arrested the bad guys before they could do any damage. The FBI claimed that hundreds of lives were saved.Today, the El Rukn gang members are the prime examples of the FBI's long-running campaign for enhanced authority to tap cellular phone calls and wired communications. Agents say that changes in technology since then have made it difficult, if not impossible, to carry out the kind of surveillance that put El Rukn's leaders behind bars.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1996
Sandra Lee Owens says her husband began hitting her six months after they got married in 1988 and continued until 1994.Baltimore County police officers who responded when she called 911, she says, were not always trained to help. And when her husband repeatedly harassed her by telephone after being jailed for battering her, she says she got what felt like a brush-off from his probation officer.The less-than-ideal response from different law enforcement agencies is expected to change as the county improves training for officials involved with domestic violence.
NEWS
By Madeleine Gruen | April 9, 2010
This month in Washtenaw County, Mich., a right-wing militia called the Hutaree was raided by state and local police and FBI agents. Nine militia members were arrested and charged with conspiring to murder a police officer then attack that officer's funeral with improvised explosive devices. This was to be the first step in the Hutaree's plot to overthrow the U.S. government. The Hutaree is only one among a number of separatist, terrorist and hate groups that view police as their No. 1 target for attack.
NEWS
September 14, 2001
FEW PASSENGERS were on hand as Baltimore-Washington International Airport reopened yesterday, but evidence of heightened security was everywhere. Get used to it. U.S. airport security had become an oxymoron. This was in stark contrast to countries such as Israel, France and Germany, where it was known all along that airport security is a life-and-death matter. Tuesday's tragedy has painfully driven that point home. Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta's announced safety precautions will make airports more intimidating.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
The fleet of Coast Guard vessels that call Baltimore home port increased by one Wednesday when the 65-foot cutter Chock arrived from Virginia. The harbor tugboat, built in 1961, was transferred from Portsmouth. The Chock and its crew of eight will be used for homeland security patrols, law enforcement and ice-breaking in the upper bay. It also will continue to be used in the lower bay. Capt. Mark O'Malley, the Coast Guard's captain of the port of Baltimore, called it "a privilege" to add the cutter to the Curtis Bay operation, noting its "long history of superior service to the mariners of the Chesapeake Bay. " Baltimore's Coast Guard station responds to more than 200 search-and-rescue incidents and conducts more than 370 law enforcement boardings annually.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | December 21, 2006
Law enforcement officers will soon be able to tap into an Internet-based database filled with information about gang members and their activities throughout Maryland, Virginia and Washington, federal officials announced in Baltimore yesterday. The Washington-Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area task force program will oversee the Gang-Net database. It should be up and running by June, said Thomas H. Carr, director of the Washington-Baltimore regional program. "It's an important first step" to combating the activities of gangs, Carr said.
NEWS
January 6, 2002
MARYLAND'S wiretap laws need to be brought up to date to deal with cell phone technology that gives criminals the upper hand. Under current law, investigators must get court permission for each phone line they wish to tap. The applications for these taps require pages of affidavits and take a lot of time to process. Meanwhile, drug dealers are buying cheap cell phones by the dozens and throwing them away after a few calls. It's nearly impossible for authorities to get and keep a tap on such quickly disposable lines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
The federal government, vastly extending the reach of an 11-year-old law, is requiring hundreds of universities, online communications companies and cities to overhaul their Internet computer networks to make it easier for law enforcement authorities to monitor e-mail and other online communications. The action, which the government says is intended to help catch terrorists and other criminals, has unleashed protests and the threat of lawsuits from universities, which argue that it will cost them at least $7 billion while doing little to apprehend lawbreakers.
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