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By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2001
STAFF MEMBERS of the Maryland House of Correction ran, walked and pulled their darnedest Tuesday at the ninth annual Department of Correction Law Enforcement Torch Run, Walk and Tug of War. Volunteers estimate that they raised more than $24,000 for disabled athletes to take part in the Maryland Special Olympics games next month. The morning began with the Torch Run, was followed by a Torch Walk around the seven buildings in the Jessup facility and culminated with the Tug of War with 18 teams of volunteers.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993
It was the mid-1970s and Allan Bakke had filed suit against the University of California's Davis Medical School for admitting a black applicant with lower test scores while rejecting him. The case ignited a controversy and spawned the phrase "reverse discrimination." It also sparked the interest of a young Rodney Stem, who was entering graduate school at Towson State University and wondering what his major should be.His choice was American minority relations. While studying that, he was allowed to take a third of the curriculum at the historically black Morgan State University, where his course work included black and women's studies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
A tornado was spotted over the Patuxent River in Calvert County on Tuesday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service. The "waterspout," as tornadoes over water are known, was seen moving west over the river about 5:55 p.m. by law enforcement, said Heather Sheffield, a NWS spokeswoman. After the spotting, which came amid thunderstorms in southern Maryland, a short-lived tornado warning was issued for parts of Calvert, Charles, St. Mary's and Prince George's counties, Sheffield said.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2002
Westminster Police Department will give up to 10 people inside access to local law enforcement starting tonight, when it offers its first Citizen Police Academy. For the next nine Tuesday nights, local businesspeople and others in the class will get a primer on the department's history and structure and law enforcement techniques such as conducting arrests and self-defense. In the three-hour sessions, they will try on the accessories officers wear: bulletproof vests, gun belts and handcuffs.
NEWS
March 1, 2002
The third class of 19 cadets in the Police Entry Level Training Program (PELTP) will graduate at 1 p.m. today in the Great Hall of Carroll Community College's annex campus, 1601 Washington Road, Westminster. The college and the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions jointly offer the program. The cadets will be commissioned at the graduation ceremony. They will receive a certificate from PELTP and a Letter of Recognition in Criminal Justice from the college. The Letter of Recognition will allow them to convert their 760 hours of training into college credits, which they may apply toward an associate degree in the Criminal Justice - Arts and Sciences transfer program at CCC. William Crabill, on-site training program manager, said it is a growing trend in the law enforcement field for officers to have an associate in arts degree and/or a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Deputy Michael A. Zepp was honored as the 2001 Deputy of the Year in ceremonies yesterday at the Carroll County sheriff's office. Zepp, 31, joined the department three years ago after serving as a Taneytown police officer. Last year, he made 43 arrests for drunken driving and had 25 criminal arrests, including 15 drug charges, said Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning. "Deputy Zepp is a very conscientious, sincere, dedicated and aggressive law enforcement officer, and he is multifaceted in his approach to law enforcement: equally good at traffic enforcement as well as criminal enforcement, including the narcotics laws," Tregoning said.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
IN THE AFTERMATH of the Million Man March, aides to President Clinton said he would consider holding a White House conference, with a blue ribbon commission, to study the current state of race relations in the nation. He is said to be wary of the idea, however, because of the broadness of its approach and the political dangers associated with trying to deal with poverty, housing, education, family breakdown, drugs and all the other problems of the black urban poor all at once.A narrower approach -- focused on law enforcement -- would avoid many of the political pitfalls and could go a long way toward improving police performance and police-community relations.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The daily parking garage at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport was closed Wednesday night and may remain closed Thursday after an undisclosed incident Wednesday night. BWI spokesman Jonathan Dean said Maryland Transportation Authority police are investigating an incident that occurred between 9:30 and 10 p.m. Wednesday at the garage. He declined to elaborate on the incident. Dean said the garage was temporarily closed, but that passenger traffic at the airport was not impacted.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
Howard County's criminal justice system is doing the best it can to punish and rehabilitate convicted criminals, a panel of local law enforcement officials told a cable television audience last night.The panel's comments and explanation of how law enforcement works in the county came during a made-for-TV "town meeting" organized by the County Executive's Ad Hoc Committee on Human Rights.The committee's Law Enforcement/Criminal Justice Group said it wanted to use last night's meeting to explain to county residents how police, prosecutors, public defenders and judges work together.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
Carroll and local town officials praised the opening of the state's Driver Training Facility for law enforcement yesterday as a boon to the county's economy and public safety. They also said it will help keep open one of Carroll's largest employers.The one-mile roadway and classroom complex is the first of three phases in the $53 million Public Safety Training Center in Sykesville, a project originally scheduled for completion in 2007.And with an additional $16 million in state money announced yesterday, the center will be completed by 2002, five years ahead of schedule.
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