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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 10, 2012
The Harford County State's Attorney's Office held its annual awards ceremony Wednesday for the top law enforcement officers who made outstanding drunk and drugged driving arrests in Harford County during 2011. State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly presented the awards in the ceremonial courtroom in the courthouse. "Our law enforcement officers are the best in their efforts to maintain safety on the roads in our county," Cassilly said. "They are responsible for saving many lives and sparing families the devastation caused by impaired drivers.
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By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake criticized the Police Department's handling of a high-profile police brutality investigation on Wednesday, and said she had directed the police commissioner to develop a "comprehensive" plan to address brutality in the agency. Speaking to reporters at City Hall, the mayor said top commanders should have quickly seen a video of an officer repeatedly punching a man, and should have moved immediately to take the officer off the street. "It is outrageous," Rawlings-Blake said of the conduct of the officer shown in the video, whom authorities have identified as Officer Vincent E. Cosom.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
Debra Arduini has always dreamed of going to the Olympics.She'll get her chance this summer, but she won't be going for the gold. She'll be part of the volunteer security team responsible for maintaining law and order at the games in Atlanta."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she has asked her senior team to explore giving Baltimore's police civilian review board a "more impactful" role in the police disciplinary process. "In order for us to be consistent across the board when we're talking about civic engagement, we have to make sure the ways in which we touch the public are impactful," she said. "I don't have answers on what, if any changes there will be. That's definitely something I am looking at. " The Police Department recently asked the civilian review board to review major "use of force" cases such as officer-involved shootings.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
Baltimore police officers may not "prevent or prohibit" people from taking photographs or video of crime scenes and other law enforcement activities that are in public view, according to a department-wide directive made public Friday. The new rules essentially repeat a policy that has long been the norm, department commanders say, but which has been difficult to enforce without written guidelines. The release of the general order comes after a series of confrontations between the seemingly ubiquitous camera-wielding public and officers in Baltimore and elsewhere — including several court challenges.
NEWS
By Becca Jesada and Lisa Viscidi and Becca Jesada and Lisa Viscidi,CONTRIBUTING WRITERS | June 4, 1998
Culminating a year of fund-raising efforts, law enforcement officers will take up the final leg of a torch run tomorrow evening to help open the Maryland Special Olympics Summer Games at the University of Maryland's College Park campus.The annual Law Enforcement Torch Run -- first held in Wichita, Kan., and emulated in other states -- has raised about $750,000 in Maryland since it was begun here in 1986 to support and promote the Special Olympics.The Torch Run begins with events at the city and county level, where participating police and correctional officers compete in races -- and pay $15 for a Torch Run T-shirt, accounting for much of the money raised.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Three Baltimore County police officers were ending their shift in the early morning hours of Halloween last year when they were dispatched to a house fire in Pikesville. There, a man in the yard yelled that his paralyzed father was trapped on the top floor. Officers Michael Forish, Michael Gerard Lynch and Zachary Small rushed into the house and found a 275-pound man in his bed, yelling for help. The three officers, gasping amid the smoke, carried him from the building as it began to collapse.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 16, 1994
LONDON, Ohio -- Standing before a battery of sheriffs and police chiefs, President Clinton yesterday gave qualified support to a controversial part of the Senate crime bill that would extend capital punishment for 50 federal crimes."
NEWS
August 8, 1996
AMONG THE MOST disturbing of crimes are those committed by law enforcement officers who are granted broad powers to protect the public from unlawful acts. An officer sinks to the lowest depths of criminality when he abuses his authority to satisfy a prurient appetite.Yet, last week, three stories of sexual misconduct, or allegations of them, against law enforcement officers made area headlines.First came the story of Edward E. "Earl" Dennis, who lost his high-ranking job as a State Police major after an administrative board found that he had sexually harassed six female troopers and a departmental secretary.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
The Sun's editorial regarding Maryland's carry law ("Attack on Md. gun laws," March 7) showed a bias against guns and law-abiding citizens who might choose to carry them. The justification for great concern over qualified, law-abiding citizens carrying guns is the threat handguns pose to citizens of Maryland. You did not mention the appalling number of murders in Maryland that the existing restrictive permit laws did nothing to stop. Criminals don't have a permit problem, and they don't have to worry about the average citizen being armed.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A Severna Park man was arrested Sunday after police allege that he impersonated a law enforcement officer after being stopped in a Taco Bell drive-through lane. Police had expected the man was intoxicated. Robert Knickerbocker, 47, of the 100 block of Cedar Road, faces driving while intoxicated and police impersonation charges, and was issued five traffic citations, according to Anne Arundel County Police. Responding to a call in the 500 block of Ritchie Highway at around 2 a.m., officers saw the driver of a Mercedes 300D repeatedly sounding the horn of his vehicle.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
The death of Robert Ethan Saylor, a 26-year-old Frederick man with Downs syndrome who stopped breathing last January after a struggle with off-duty county sheriff's deputies who were attempting to remove him from a local movie theater, sparked a national debate over how police treat people with developmental disabilities. Yet it remains an issue that is far from resolved. Today, Mr. Saylor's family, friends and supporters representing national disabilities rights groups met with Gov. Martin O'Malley to ask him to reopen the investigation into the circumstances surrounding Mr. Saylor's death and to demand better training for law enforcement officers who deal with people with developmental disabilities.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
When Jeannine Andrews is driving and her children see a police car nearby, the first thing they ask is, "Are you speeding?" she says. Youngsters can easily get the idea that police only show up when laws are being broken, but Andrews said that perception has been fading among her children in recent weeks. Each Monday during the summer, she takes them to Talbot Springs Pool in Columbia, one of the sites where the Howard County Police Department is holding its Community Athletic Program, a mobile recreation center with activities for youth.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
I must take issue with a recent letter to the editor slamming the sheriff of Garrett County for his stand against enforcing the new gun law ("The booboisie emerges victorious," June 10). First, I'm a registered Democrat. Second, I never owned a gun and don't want one. But what upsets me about this letter is the reader's apparent belief that everyone outside the metropolitan area is a "brainless serf. " How does anyone have the arrogance to come up with this kind of thinking? During my career with the state, I have been to every county in Maryland and dealt with county and municipal administrators, elected officials, law enforcement officers, government employees and ordinary citizens.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 10, 2013
Police officers, both sworn and retired, from the Harford County Sheriff's Office, Maryland State Police and Aberdeen Police and Aberdeen Proving Ground police departments carried the Flame of Hope on an 18-mile journey through Harford County last week to benefit Maryland Special Olympics. Officers carried the Flame of Hope ceremonial torch through Havre de Grace, Aberdeen, Edgewood and Joppa to raise awareness and money in support of Maryland's Special Olympics. Approximately 25 runners took part in the event.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 28, 2013
The Harford County State's Attorney's Office honored local law enforcement officers, at the annual DUI Award Ceremony May 15, for their drunk driving enforcement efforts. Harford State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly presented awards to law enforcement officers who made outstanding drunk and drugged driving arrests during 2012. The ceremony was held in the ceremonial courtroom in the Harford County Courthouse in Bel Air. "Our law enforcement officers are the best in their efforts to maintain safety on the county's roads," Cassilly said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff | October 1, 1995
More than five years after it was proposed, state officials say a $46 million police training center will be built at Springfield Hospital Center. The Public Safety Training Center, an on-again, off-again project firstxon said. "The state will be making a major investment in this county. There will be more law enforcement officers here than anywhere in the state."The state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services will build the center on 720 acres deeded from Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Benjamin Lipsitz, whose commitment to the spirit and letter of the law led him to defend a would-be assassin, a Nazi sympathizer and a craven murderer during a career that spanned more than a half-century, died May 10. He was 94. "He was so fundamentally devoted to justice. He was Atticus Finch all over again," said retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Fader II. "To me, he was what lawyering and what representation are all about. " Lipsitz was chosen to defend Arthur Bremer, accused of shooting Democratic presidential candidate George Wallace and three others, including a Secret Service agent, at a Laurel shopping center in 1972.
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