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NEWS
June 18, 2012
Your editorial "Getting down to brass tags" (June 14) left out a few facts that might give your readers a clearer view of the value of adding microstamping technology to pistols as a way of tracing spent shell-casings found at crime scenes to a particular handgun. Independent studies by the National Academy of Science, by the University of California at Davis, and by George Krivosta of the American Society of Firearm and Toolmark Examiners concluded the technology is underdeveloped, producing inaccurate results that are easily circumvented, either on purpose or by simple use of the firearm within a few number of rounds fired.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
On March 20, police in Washington issued an Amber Alert for missing 8-year-old Relisha Rudd, alerting residents that the girl could be traveling with a suspected abductor. Washington police said they asked law enforcement agencies across the region to extend the alert. But Maryland officials say they never got the request, though some of the initial search for the girl centered in neighboring Prince George's County. "The bottom line is this: The Maryland State Police have never been asked to issue an Amber Alert in this case," said spokesman Gregory M. Shipley.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Prosecutors, police chiefs and sheriffs gathered in Annapolis Tuesday to push back against the growing movement to decriminalize possession of small amounts or marijuana or to legalize recreational use of the drug altogether. At a news conference and at a Senate hearing, law enforcement leaders warned that loosening marijuana laws would undermine drug enforcement across the board. They said it would be premature to pass a bill following in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington state, which recently legalized pot, and opposed a separate measure that would treat possession as a minor civil offense.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
While Dan Rodricks ' column was unfairly derisive in its characterization of Maryland's police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors who oppose the legalization of marijuana, he did state one undeniable truth: The legalization of marijuana will mean that more people will smoke pot ( "Pot fears expose fears about societal health," Feb. 27). They will smoke marijuana in order to get high and then get into cars and trucks and drive on our highways. Marijuana is a potent drug with a proven connection to aggressive behavior.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Five Maryland police officers died in the line of duty this year, the seventh-highest count among the 50 states, according to a national report released Monday. Nationwide, 160 officers were killed in 2010, as police fatalities jumped 37 percent after two years of declines, according to preliminary figures released Monday by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. Four of the Maryland officers died in traffic collisions, which matched a trend: Crashes accounted for almost half of the nationwide increase, according to the memorial fund, which produces an annual survey of police fatalities.
EXPLORE
July 3, 2011
After years of discussion, several changes in public policy course and an election cycle where options were hotly debated — the Carroll County Sheriff's Office officially became the principal provider of law enforcement in Carroll on July 1. The move marks a phasing out of the Resident Trooper Program in Carroll, through which Maryland State Police had been the primary law enforcement agency under a contract with the county. In February of this year, a memorandum of understanding formalizing the move was signed between the Sheriff's Office, the Maryland State Police and the county's Office of Public Safety Support Services.  The agreement increases the responsibilities of the Sheriff's Office, establishes a timetable to increase staffing and provides for a transition of duties.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
An interesting detail emerged after a gray Chevy Cobalt hit two Baltimore police officers Wednesday and led dozens of patrol cars and a police helicopter on a chase: the state license plates affixed to the car started with "FPD" and carried a law-enforcement style, star-shaped insignia. Baltimore police said the car was driven by Alycia Marie Hoffman, 25, a Bel Air woman with a lengthy arrest record, according to court records. She has no known law enforcement background and did not own the car. Released through the Fraternal Order of Police Maryland State Lodge, the plates were issued to a retired Harford County deputy sheriff who owns the car, Maryland FOP president Rodney Bartlett said.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 10, 2013
Police officers, both sworn and retired, from the Harford County Sheriff's Office, Maryland State Police and Aberdeen Police and Aberdeen Proving Ground police departments carried the Flame of Hope on an 18-mile journey through Harford County last week to benefit Maryland Special Olympics. Officers carried the Flame of Hope ceremonial torch through Havre de Grace, Aberdeen, Edgewood and Joppa to raise awareness and money in support of Maryland's Special Olympics. Approximately 25 runners took part in the event.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Baltimore-area police departments are among the law enforcement agencies worldwide expected to take in part Friday in the first Global Police Tweet-a-Thon on Twitter. Annapolis, Baltimore and Salisbury are among the departments in Maryland that are participating. Det. Amy Miguez of the Annapolis Police Department said she is going to be tweeting virtual ride-alongs for two patrol officers, filling in any down time by tweeting safety tips and other information. The digital event, with dozens of police agencies joining in, is aimed at giving citizens a peek into the realm of daily police work while promoting the use of social media by police.
NEWS
By Greg Kline | February 26, 2014
The Maryland General Assembly yesterday held an extensive set of hearings on a variety of bills dealing with marijuana.  The bills varied from outright legalization to various decriminalization options. Much of the debate was predictable, but a few changes to the script did appear.   Law enforcement and prosecutors from around the state rallied in Annapolis to testify against legalization and many of the reform efforts.  This overwhelmed the couple of retired law enforcement officers who legalization advocates have been touting as representative of the law enforcement community's willingness to surrender their efforts at drug enforcement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Prosecutors, police chiefs and sheriffs gathered in Annapolis Tuesday to push back against the growing movement to decriminalize possession of small amounts or marijuana or to legalize recreational use of the drug altogether. At a news conference and at a Senate hearing, law enforcement leaders warned that loosening marijuana laws would undermine drug enforcement across the board. They said it would be premature to pass a bill following in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington state, which recently legalized pot, and opposed a separate measure that would treat possession as a minor civil offense.
NEWS
By Justin George and Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
The topic of crime has become so contentious in Southeast Baltimore that Sarah Fox removed herself from her community's Facebook page because she couldn't take the arguing. Fox feels safe in her home along Patterson Park, but her neighbors have been shaken by a spike in area violence. The robbery at gunpoint of a 12-year-old walking to school, the daytime rape of a woman in an alleyway and the killing of a woman in her home have put many on edge in this relatively well-to-do area that contains some of the city's fastest-growing neighborhoods.
NEWS
February 8, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts recently argued that marijuana should not be legalized because its sales have contributed to the increase in homicides this year ("Baltimore Police commissioner not in favor of marijuana legalization," Jan. 30). Among other things, the commissioner said that "if you call a guy who has weed, and you meet him in a dark alley ... those are ending up in very problematic ... situations. " What Mr. Batts fails to grasp, however, is something that I learned the hard way in my 34 years as a police officer: It is the very illegality of these drugs that creates violence around them.
NEWS
By Jack Vaughan and Ed Kardauskas | February 5, 2014
If it seems that tragedies like the shooting at The Mall in Columbia last month are becoming more frequent, it's because they are. That's what a new study published in the FBI's Law Enforcement Bulletin last month concluded. It found that since 2009, active shooter events have more than tripled in frequency, and the numbers of people killed or injured have risen sharply too. How should society respond to such a trend? Certainly it should seek ways to prevent such tragedies before they occur, but it should also look for ways to limit casualties when they do. Nothing is more effective in limiting the loss of life than proper training.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
A report released this week from the National Registry of Exonerations, a joint venture between two Midwestern law schools, hails 2013 as a "record-breaking" year for exonerations - though the term is used loosely. Overturned convictions may have little to do with the establishment of actual innocence and more to do with the discovery of mistakes or misdeeds in the legal proceedings. Around the country, at least 87 convictions were overturned last year, including two in Maryland - one because information about the unreliability of a key witness was withheld from the defense and the other because DNA analysis revealed another man committed the crime.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 18, 1996
For 12 years Tyrone Powers worked in law enforcement, a writer trapped in, first, a state trooper's, then a G-man's, body.You have to wonder after reading his autobiography "Eyes To My Soul" if, during all those years, the writer in him was struggling to get out.This is no average autobiography, which is usually heavy on the auto and light on the bio. And Powers is no average writer. When he writes about an FBI agent trying to goad him into a confrontation, Powers puts the reader right in the office.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Maryland legislators will consider a package of laws to curb electronic surveillance by police, requiring a search warrant to use drones, email, cellphone towers or license plate readers to track people. Measures sponsored by a bipartisan pair of senators come amid a national debate over government surveillance after revelations about the extent to which the National Security Agency collects information on U.S. citizens. The Maryland legislation would go further than federal privacy laws but apply only to state and local police forces.
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