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NEWS
June 18, 2012
Your editorial "Getting down to brass tags" (June 14) left out a few facts that might give your readers a clearer view of the value of adding microstamping technology to pistols as a way of tracing spent shell-casings found at crime scenes to a particular handgun. Independent studies by the National Academy of Science, by the University of California at Davis, and by George Krivosta of the American Society of Firearm and Toolmark Examiners concluded the technology is underdeveloped, producing inaccurate results that are easily circumvented, either on purpose or by simple use of the firearm within a few number of rounds fired.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 30, 2014
With a resurgence of violence in Ferguson, Mo., I am reminded of a revelation that I had over 30 years ago upon becoming an inner city police officer. I learned to accept, but not fully understand, that the perceived value to human life on the street in many of the downtrodden areas of America is substantially lower than it is to the police and many others living under better socio-economic circumstances. When the two cultures of diverse values clash it often results in those with higher self-esteem being forced to take actions they would not choose to take except out of a desire for self-preservation.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Five Maryland police officers died in the line of duty this year, the seventh-highest count among the 50 states, according to a national report released Monday. Nationwide, 160 officers were killed in 2010, as police fatalities jumped 37 percent after two years of declines, according to preliminary figures released Monday by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. Four of the Maryland officers died in traffic collisions, which matched a trend: Crashes accounted for almost half of the nationwide increase, according to the memorial fund, which produces an annual survey of police fatalities.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 8, 2014
The Harford County State's Attorney's Office recently honored top area law enforcement officers who made outstanding drunk and drugged driving arrests in 2013. The annual award ceremony was held April 30 in the Harford County Courthouse's ceremonial courtroom. The ceremony also recognized Drug Recognition Experts, or DREs, who are instrumental in arrests of drugged drivers. "Our law enforcement officers are the best in their efforts to maintain safety on the county's roads," Harford State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly said in statement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Prosecutors, police chiefs and sheriffs gathered in Annapolis Tuesday to push back against the growing movement to decriminalize possession of small amounts or marijuana or to legalize recreational use of the drug altogether. At a news conference and at a Senate hearing, law enforcement leaders warned that loosening marijuana laws would undermine drug enforcement across the board. They said it would be premature to pass a bill following in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington state, which recently legalized pot, and opposed a separate measure that would treat possession as a minor civil offense.
EXPLORE
July 3, 2011
After years of discussion, several changes in public policy course and an election cycle where options were hotly debated — the Carroll County Sheriff's Office officially became the principal provider of law enforcement in Carroll on July 1. The move marks a phasing out of the Resident Trooper Program in Carroll, through which Maryland State Police had been the primary law enforcement agency under a contract with the county. In February of this year, a memorandum of understanding formalizing the move was signed between the Sheriff's Office, the Maryland State Police and the county's Office of Public Safety Support Services.  The agreement increases the responsibilities of the Sheriff's Office, establishes a timetable to increase staffing and provides for a transition of duties.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
An interesting detail emerged after a gray Chevy Cobalt hit two Baltimore police officers Wednesday and led dozens of patrol cars and a police helicopter on a chase: the state license plates affixed to the car started with "FPD" and carried a law-enforcement style, star-shaped insignia. Baltimore police said the car was driven by Alycia Marie Hoffman, 25, a Bel Air woman with a lengthy arrest record, according to court records. She has no known law enforcement background and did not own the car. Released through the Fraternal Order of Police Maryland State Lodge, the plates were issued to a retired Harford County deputy sheriff who owns the car, Maryland FOP president Rodney Bartlett said.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Police officials marked the formal grand opening Friday of the Howard County Police Museum. The museum, located inside the Howard County Welcome Center on Main Street in Ellicott City, includes exhibits on fallen officers, vintage uniforms, past chiefs of police and antique weapons. "We need to capture the history of this agency," said Howard County Police Chief William McMahon, who is retiring from the top job next week. Retired Howard County Sergeant Larry Corum, who was heavily involved in the project, said the museum shows how far the department has come over the course of its 61-year history.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Maryland's decision to join a handful of states that allow undocumented immigrants the chance to obtain driver's licenses was a pragmatic one designed to keep residents safe. Border security, deportation policy and pathways to citizenship are not within Maryland's purview, but ensuring that drivers on the road are competent, that their vehicles are registered and that they purchase insurance are the state's responsibility. The establishment of a two-tiered license system here - in which those who cannot document their immigration status are allowed the chance to obtain a license valid for driving but not purposes like getting on airplanes or entering federal buildings - was simply a rational response to the twin facts that some hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants live in Maryland and that by necessity they will drive whether we like it or not. The policy is of a piece with others the state has adopted in recent months.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake criticized the Police Department's handling of a high-profile police brutality investigation on Wednesday, and said she had directed the police commissioner to develop a "comprehensive" plan to address brutality in the agency. Speaking to reporters at City Hall, the mayor said top commanders should have quickly seen a video of an officer repeatedly punching a man, and should have moved immediately to take the officer off the street. "It is outrageous," Rawlings-Blake said of the conduct of the officer shown in the video, whom authorities have identified as Officer Vincent E. Cosom.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The furor over former Raven Ray Rice thrust the issue of domestic violence into the spotlight, but it also highlighted a part of football that fans likely spend little time thinking about: the league's security apparatus. Staffed largely by former police and federal law enforcement personnel — often high-ranking ones — the security departments maintained by the league and individual teams have a reputation of being able to work their contacts and launch behind-the-scenes investigations at the first sign of trouble.
NEWS
By Kristine Beckerle, Deborah Francois and Babur Khwaja | August 28, 2014
Police in Faisalabad, Pakistan's third largest city, tortured more than 1,400 people during a six-year period, according to a report researched and written by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School, for Justice Project Pakistan (JPP), a non-governmental organization based in Lahore, Pakistan. The report, which we authored, documents how law enforcement uses its power to inflict pain largely with impunity. Police beat detainees, hang them by their arms or feet for hours on end, force them to witness the torture of others, and strip them naked and parade them in public.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 25, 2014
One of the unsung blessings of Twitter is the way it continually reminds us that willful ignorance is alive and thriving in the American body politic. In the past week, we were treated to widely retweeted photos purporting to show Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol throwing a gang sign. The first controversial image showed up on an unvetted CNN social media webpage called iReport, and Internet trolls took it from there. The only problem is that the hand sign in question was the greeting of Kappa Alpha Psi, a historically black fraternity of which Johnson is a member.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
Local police departments in Maryland have received more than $12 million in excess equipment from the U.S. military - from a $400,000 "mine-resistant vehicle" to a set of a dozen spoons valued at $3.06 apiece - through a federal program that has come under bipartisan scrutiny. In all, local law enforcement agencies in the state have received more than 2,000 assault rifles, 873 semi-automatic handguns and 220 12-gauge shotguns from the Department of Defense Excess Property Program since 2006, according to Pentagon data made public Friday.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 10, 2013
Police officers, both sworn and retired, from the Harford County Sheriff's Office, Maryland State Police and Aberdeen Police and Aberdeen Proving Ground police departments carried the Flame of Hope on an 18-mile journey through Harford County last week to benefit Maryland Special Olympics. Officers carried the Flame of Hope ceremonial torch through Havre de Grace, Aberdeen, Edgewood and Joppa to raise awareness and money in support of Maryland's Special Olympics. Approximately 25 runners took part in the event.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
In a particularly naked bit of pandering, Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan appeared before the state Fraternal Order of Police this week as part of its process of determining its endorsement in the fall election and promised to exempt law enforcement officers' pensions from the state income tax. As intuitively appealing as it might seem to help those who have served, it's a bad idea. To his credit, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the Democratic candidate, appeared before the same groups a day later and said he would not make that promise, preferring to seek comprehensive tax reform that benefits the middle class rather than making promises to every group.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew fell like an unseen curtain across the city Friday night, and on many blocks, children continued to play outside for the first few minutes, oblivious to the controversial law. But at Poe Homes in West Baltimore, two mothers sitting on their front porches said they were obeying the rules willingly and happily. "It gets dark at 8 o'clock," said Nicole Williams as her 8-year-old son, Isaiah Turner, ran around just before the new law fell into place. "What child has reason to be outside?"
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