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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Fed up with rodents and flooding, about half of the members of Baltimore's law department are leaving their ground-level offices at City Hall for a renovated facility in downtown Baltimore. The $306,000 cost of the renovations was approved Wednesday by the city's Board of Estimates. About 50 law department employees will move from City Hall to two floors on city-owned property at 7 E. Redwood St. "It became an environmental challenge," said City Solicitor George Nilson of the ground-level offices.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Fed up with rodents and flooding, about half of the members of Baltimore's law department are leaving their ground-level offices at City Hall for a renovated facility in downtown Baltimore. The $306,000 cost of the renovations was approved Wednesday by the city's Board of Estimates. About 50 law department employees will move from City Hall to two floors on city-owned property at 7 E. Redwood St. "It became an environmental challenge," said City Solicitor George Nilson of the ground-level offices.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon's legal defense received a boost yesterday from the city Law Department, less than a week after her indictment on public corruption charges. A two-page letter from the department, headed by a Dixon appointee, said a list of companies doing business with the city fails to meet technical requirements laid out in city ethics laws. That conclusion is consistent with arguments last week by Dixon's attorney, who said charges that she accepted gifts from a city developer and failed to report them wouldn't stick, in part because the city did not keep a list of eligible companies as required.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The City Council voted unanimously Monday night to approve a bill that will require businesses getting large city contracts or financial support to hire 51 percent of new workers from Baltimore. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will let the bill become law without her signature, her spokesman said afterward. Approval of the legislation, sponsored by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, means Baltimore will join cities including San Francisco and Boston in adopting such an ordinance.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Shapiro and Olander, whose lucrative city work has been a source of controversy because of the law firm's close ties to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, is out as the principal counsel to Baltimore's economic development agency and empowerment zone.The city Law Department will handle most of the work for the Baltimore Development Corp. previously done by Shapiro and Olander, and the Empowerment Zone Management Corp. will seek to get legal work done for free, the mayor and other officials said yesterday.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2000
A 19-year veteran of the city's legal department has contended in a federal lawsuit that he was fired this spring as part of an "age-based jihad" orchestrated by the city solicitor in the name of Baltimore's youthful new mayor. Stanley C. Rogosin, 54, alleges that he was forced out of the law department soon after City Solicitor Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr. took office and made critical comments about career government employees. "Zollicoffer's employment decisions were motivated by his youth-obsessed drive to model the city law department in his own image, and in the image of his youthful boss, Mayor Martin O'Malley," Rogosin alleges in the suit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 1996
Baltimore's deputy comptroller, Shirley A. Williams, has taken an administrative job with the city Law Department and is being replaced by B. Harriette Taylor, the acting director of the Legal Aid Bureau.Williams, a longtime city employee who was acting city comptroller for nearly two years after Jacqueline F. McLean resigned in a corruption scandal in 1994, will head the Law Department's new management division. Her responsibilities will include overseeing the budget and directing the Equal Opportunity Compliance Office.
NEWS
September 23, 1995
THE DECISION by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to evaluate the city law department and find ways to rely less on outside legal advice comes at an opportune time. With the mayor having crushed his opposition in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary, he has a chance to change the way he runs the city and attack weaknesses in his administration's past performance.City Council President Mary Pat Clarke made good mileage in her campaign against Mr. Schmoke by pointing out how extravagant the city has been in hiring legal consultants.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
The Board of Estimates narrowly approved an amendment yesterday that clears the way for a major development in Fells Point, despite votes against it by the City Council president and the city comptroller. The amendment to the Fells Point Urban Renewal Plan changed the land-use designation of a parcel at Caroline and Lancaster streets from residential and commercial to mixed use. Whitman, Requardt & Associates, an engineering firm in the 2300 block of St. Paul St., will move its headquarters to a four-story building to be erected on the site.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Heeding the city Law Department's request for help in specialized legal matters, Baltimore's top officials voted yesterday to hire three outside firms at a cost of more than $500,000, including a $100,000 retainer to former City Solicitor Neal M. Janey and another attorney.The Board of Estimates -- a five-member panel that includes the mayor, council president and comptroller -- approved the expenditures with little public discussion.The cases include a dispute about overtime for police officers and a legal tussle over water rights at the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
The city's spending panel on Wednesday approved a $72,000 payout to three family members who accused Baltimore police of assaulting and falsely arresting them outside of a Federal Hill bar. The Board of Estimates voted to award the money to Rony, Ronnie and Eileen Reyes to settle a $99 million suit brought against the police department after a 2010 incident at Mad River Bar & Grille. On Oct. 16, the Reyes family went to the bar and stayed there until closing time, according to board documents.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
On the face of it, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's local hiring bill sounds eminently reasonable. When Baltimore spends its residents' tax dollars, why shouldn't it do so in a way that supports hiring city residents, particularly considering the high rate of unemployment here? That common-sense appeal, perhaps, explains why the measure got preliminary approval on a unanimous vote Monday night. Indeed, it sounds like such a good idea that one might wonder: Why doesn't every city and county do the same thing?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
In a unanimous vote, the City Council gave preliminary approval Monday to a bill that would require businesses getting large city contracts or financial support to hire 51 percent of new workers from Baltimore. "My council colleagues believe this is a fair thing to do," Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, the bill's lead sponsor, said after the vote. "We have an unemployment rate of 9.6 percent. We need to get Baltimore City to work. There are qualified people in this city that can do these jobs.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The Baltimore Police Department tapped one of its lawyers as the new head of internal affairs, saying Rodney Hill's experience as an officer and his recent turn as a prosecutor of police misconduct cases give him the credibility to lead a group charged with restoring public trust. Hill, 50, replaces Grayling Williams, who left in March to accept a position with the Pennsylvania attorney general's office. Since April 2012, Hill has been assigned to the Police Department through the city's Law Department, providing legal advice to internal investigators, prosecuting police officers at internal disciplinary hearing boards and representing the department in court.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Outside West Baltimore's Penn Station Liquors, folks say the store is no place for children. Only a block away from Westside Elementary School, Penn Station is one of four liquor businesses within feet of each other on North Fulton Street. Youngsters sometimes wander in to buy candy, soda and chips - stocked next to the alcohol, flavored cigars and sex pills. "Kids don't belong here," says Pauline White, 50, who lives nearby. "When people start drinking, they get crazy. " On Monday, the City Council overwhelmingly voted to pass a bill, championed by freshman Councilman Nick Mosby, to make it illegal for liquor stores to sell anything to minors, including seemingly innocuous goods such as snacks or T-shirts.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Like a car salesman, the City of Baltimore started high, came down and ended up making a deal all sides could live with. The city has agreed to give Patterson Park homeowner Maureen Coyle about two years to repay $5,702 worth of property tax breaks that she didn't ask for and that she thought reflected a legitimate discount for being an owner-occupant, Coyle says. On Friday the city's law department emailed her a contract spelling out terms of the deal that will require her to repay $250 a month.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
In an attempt to find new ways to reduce Baltimore's reliance on private law firms, the city Law Department is starting a computerized accounting system to keep better track of the cost of city-related legal work.The city's 79 lawyers will be required to account for their work by the hour to measure the department's efficiency and determine how much additional legal work it can handle that is now being done by outside firms.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that better accounting would help the city come up with ways to save money.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1991
New positionsMid-Atlantic Country Magazine in Greenbelt named Laurin Talley Ensslin associate publisher/advertising director. Ryland Building Co., a division of The Ryland Group Inc. in Columbia, promoted Timothy R. Doyle to president of the Midwest region, based in Cincinnati. Spivey Associates, the Baltimore agency of Mutual of New York, a provider of insurance, pension and investment products, named John Little, Kenneth F. DeFelice, Richard B. Teitelman and Robert G. Savoyna members of the agency.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's office violated city policy by using the services of a computer contractor hired by the Department of Transportation without negotiating a separate contract, according to a report this week by the city's inspector general. According to inspector general David N. McClintock, Young's chief of staff asked transportation officials if the computer contractor could work on the council's website shortly after Young took office in February. The chief of staff, William Driscoll, worked for the transportation department prior to joining Young's staff.
NEWS
April 30, 2009
Nuclear reactor recommended An official charged with weighing the pros and cons of building a third nuclear reactor at the Calvert Cliffs power plant recommended Wednesday that state energy regulators approve the project. Constellation Energy Group and a French partner are seeking permission to expand Constellation's plant in Calvert County, work that Gov. Martin O'Malley and others say will help address a predicted electricity shortage while slowing customer rate increases. The approval proposed Wednesday by Public Service Commission hearing examiner Joel M. Bright will become final May 29, unless the commission or one of the parties objects.
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