Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLaw Books
IN THE NEWS

Law Books

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller is right that Maryland isn't "the Southern state that [it] used to be" and has become more progressive ("Session ends in a flurry of votes," April 9). Yet, for all the progress that has been made, there remains one blemish on Maryland's progressive record that legislators should act to remove as soon as they reconvene: Maryland's sodomy laws. Maryland is one of only 18 states in the nation with sodomy laws still on the books. Of those states, half are in the South (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller is right that Maryland isn't "the Southern state that [it] used to be" and has become more progressive ("Session ends in a flurry of votes," April 9). Yet, for all the progress that has been made, there remains one blemish on Maryland's progressive record that legislators should act to remove as soon as they reconvene: Maryland's sodomy laws. Maryland is one of only 18 states in the nation with sodomy laws still on the books. Of those states, half are in the South (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia)
Advertisement
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has decided to take on Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III in a public display of rage. Now let's look at this fight she has publicly ventured into. Mr. Bealefeld puts a sign on his property supporting someone else besides Ms. Jessamy for state's attorney. Yes, he has the right to support any candidate he wants for office. Now Ms. Jessamy straps on her law books and stands on the street calling out the commissioner.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Like many of Gov. Martin O'Malley's constituents, I strongly urge him to withdraw any legislation to ban so-called "assault weapons" and "high capacity" magazines. He should stop any legislation that creates gun-free zones and not make laws that hurt law-abiding citizens and hinder commerce in this state. Paradoxically, gun control clears a path for violence and makes aggression more likely. Creating gun-free zones doesn't make a difference to a criminal who intends to do harm. If gun-free zones made a difference, why would the worst shootings consistently happen in gun-free zones such as schools, malls and theaters?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
When she came home from working a shift at Subway and found Detective Caprice Smith's business card stuck in the front door with the words "Please call" scribbled on the back, the 10 life-changing minutes she had spent in the back seat of a Cherry Hill cab came flooding back. For five years, the woman had waited for police to find the man who had raped her in the South Baltimore neighborhood when she was just 13. At some point, she had stopped believing it would ever happen. "I thought there was nobody looking for him," she would later recall, crying.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Like many of Gov. Martin O'Malley's constituents, I strongly urge him to withdraw any legislation to ban so-called "assault weapons" and "high capacity" magazines. He should stop any legislation that creates gun-free zones and not make laws that hurt law-abiding citizens and hinder commerce in this state. Paradoxically, gun control clears a path for violence and makes aggression more likely. Creating gun-free zones doesn't make a difference to a criminal who intends to do harm. If gun-free zones made a difference, why would the worst shootings consistently happen in gun-free zones such as schools, malls and theaters?
NEWS
February 15, 2008
Stanley Cohen, a retired law books salesman, died of heart failure in his sleep Thursday at Atrium Village in Owings Mills. The Mondawmin area resident was 84. Born in Baltimore, he lived nearly all his life on Liberty Heights Avenue. He was a 1940 City College graduate and earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. He served in the Navy during World War II. Mr. Cohen was a representative of McGraw-Hill's Shepard Law Books division and earlier held other sales positions.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 25, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- He was going to be a lawyer. He was a Phi PTC Beta Kappa graduate of Coe College in Iowa, and Harvard Law School had accepted him. This was in 1951. Marv Levy was walking Harvard Square and taking classes, installed on a career track leading to fortune, prestige and an obituary in The New York Times. There was only one problem. He wanted to be a football coach."Finally," he said yesterday, a smile on his Jason Robards face, "I came to the realization that I wasn't going to be happy unless I tried it. The hardest part was making the phone call to my father.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Edward Nicholas "Ned" deRussy, a longtime law book sales representative, died of pneumonia Saturday at his Blakehurst Life Care Community home in Towson. He was 90. A longtime resident of Ruxton, he was known in the legal community as an accomplished and well-read man who tended to the needs of lawyers and libraries in Maryland and Delaware. A lawyer by education, he sold books for West Publishing Co. and spent 37 years with the specialty publishing house in the Baltimore area. When he retired in 1978, the Bar Association of Baltimore City honored him, and West gave a portrait of him to be displayed in the bar library in the Baltimore Criminal Courts Building.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
A prisoner who has filed 17 lawsuits against state correctional officials since 1991 will get a chance to argue for compensatory and punitive damages from them because they refused to give him the law book he ordered by mail.The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled Friday that Earl Wilkins, serving 25 years for a Baltimore rape and assault conviction, can seek damages from corrections officials because they violated his rights by neither giving him his Maryland Evidence Handbook, reimbursing the $75 he paid for it, nor promptly addressing various aspects of his complaint.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
When she came home from working a shift at Subway and found Detective Caprice Smith's business card stuck in the front door with the words "Please call" scribbled on the back, the 10 life-changing minutes she had spent in the back seat of a Cherry Hill cab came flooding back. For five years, the woman had waited for police to find the man who had raped her in the South Baltimore neighborhood when she was just 13. At some point, she had stopped believing it would ever happen. "I thought there was nobody looking for him," she would later recall, crying.
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has decided to take on Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III in a public display of rage. Now let's look at this fight she has publicly ventured into. Mr. Bealefeld puts a sign on his property supporting someone else besides Ms. Jessamy for state's attorney. Yes, he has the right to support any candidate he wants for office. Now Ms. Jessamy straps on her law books and stands on the street calling out the commissioner.
NEWS
February 15, 2008
Stanley Cohen, a retired law books salesman, died of heart failure in his sleep Thursday at Atrium Village in Owings Mills. The Mondawmin area resident was 84. Born in Baltimore, he lived nearly all his life on Liberty Heights Avenue. He was a 1940 City College graduate and earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. He served in the Navy during World War II. Mr. Cohen was a representative of McGraw-Hill's Shepard Law Books division and earlier held other sales positions.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Breaking a long silence on one of the most divisive issues in Annapolis this year, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday that he backs the concept of stem-cell research, including experiments using human embryos. But lawmakers said the governor's statement so late in the legislative session would not be enough to secure passage of a stalled bill that would commit state dollars to such research. As the session draws to a close at midnight tomorrow, it appears that embryonic stem cell research will join slot machine gambling and other high-profile bills that will die for lack of a compromise - a common fate for groundbreaking or contentious initiatives in their early stages.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Edward Nicholas "Ned" deRussy, a longtime law book sales representative, died of pneumonia Saturday at his Blakehurst Life Care Community home in Towson. He was 90. A longtime resident of Ruxton, he was known in the legal community as an accomplished and well-read man who tended to the needs of lawyers and libraries in Maryland and Delaware. A lawyer by education, he sold books for West Publishing Co. and spent 37 years with the specialty publishing house in the Baltimore area. When he retired in 1978, the Bar Association of Baltimore City honored him, and West gave a portrait of him to be displayed in the bar library in the Baltimore Criminal Courts Building.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
A prisoner who has filed 17 lawsuits against state correctional officials since 1991 will get a chance to argue for compensatory and punitive damages from them because they refused to give him the law book he ordered by mail.The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled Friday that Earl Wilkins, serving 25 years for a Baltimore rape and assault conviction, can seek damages from corrections officials because they violated his rights by neither giving him his Maryland Evidence Handbook, reimbursing the $75 he paid for it, nor promptly addressing various aspects of his complaint.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Michael James and Dennis O'Brien and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
Robert Mack Bell started his career on the wrong side of the law. But the law came around to his way of thinking.It was June 17, 1960, and Bell, then a 16-year-old Dunbar High School student, walked with 11 friends into the segregated Hooper's Restaurant at Charles and Fayette streets, sat down and demanded to be served.They were arrested and later convicted of violating the state's trespass statute and fined $10 each. But the students -- represented by Juanita Jackson Mitchell and Thurgood Marshall -- fought racism all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and got their convictions overturned in the case known as Bell vs. Maryland.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Breaking a long silence on one of the most divisive issues in Annapolis this year, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday that he backs the concept of stem-cell research, including experiments using human embryos. But lawmakers said the governor's statement so late in the legislative session would not be enough to secure passage of a stalled bill that would commit state dollars to such research. As the session draws to a close at midnight tomorrow, it appears that embryonic stem cell research will join slot machine gambling and other high-profile bills that will die for lack of a compromise - a common fate for groundbreaking or contentious initiatives in their early stages.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Michael James and Dennis O'Brien and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
Robert Mack Bell started his career on the wrong side of the law. But the law came around to his way of thinking.It was June 17, 1960, and Bell, then a 16-year-old Dunbar High School student, walked with 11 friends into the segregated Hooper's Restaurant at Charles and Fayette streets, sat down and demanded to be served.They were arrested and later convicted of violating the state's trespass statute and fined $10 each. But the students -- represented by Juanita Jackson Mitchell and Thurgood Marshall -- fought racism all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and got their convictions overturned in the case known as Bell vs. Maryland.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 25, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- He was going to be a lawyer. He was a Phi PTC Beta Kappa graduate of Coe College in Iowa, and Harvard Law School had accepted him. This was in 1951. Marv Levy was walking Harvard Square and taking classes, installed on a career track leading to fortune, prestige and an obituary in The New York Times. There was only one problem. He wanted to be a football coach."Finally," he said yesterday, a smile on his Jason Robards face, "I came to the realization that I wasn't going to be happy unless I tried it. The hardest part was making the phone call to my father.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.