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By CARL T. ROWAN | August 19, 1991
Washington. -- In the presidential elections of 1968 and 1972, the centerpiece of Richard Nixon's appeal to ''the white backlash'' was his promise to ''take crime out of the streets.''''He did -- and put it in the White House,'' one wag observed, as many Nixon aides were going to prison.Ronald Reagan won millions of votes in 1980 with his vows to restore ''law and order,'' a cry that still was sellable in 1984 even though the Reagan administration itself was clearly riddled with money-grubbing lawbreakers.
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NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
In the race for Baltimore County state's attorney, a rematch of the 2006 contest between Scott D. Shellenberger and Stephen Bailey, law-and-order issues have taken a back seat to accusations of wasteful spending. Shellenberger, a first-term Democrat, is promoting his accomplishments, which include carrying out a policy to record inmates' phone calls and prosecuting the state's first fetal homicide case. He is also playing up his role in the county's record-low crime statistics. Bailey, his Republican opponent, agrees that for the most part Shellenberger has done a good job as state's attorney, and he wants to expand some of his initiatives.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | May 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is traveling to Los Angeles today to sift through the embers of last week's riots in hopes of rekindling one of his favorite campaign issues: law and order.The deadly urban violence that followed the Rodney King beating verdict has given Mr. Bush the chance to revive a theme that played a critical role in his 1988 election but was sidetracked last fall by concerns over the economy.During his two-day visit to Los Angeles, the president may spend much of his time promoting an urban policy agenda that focuses on self-help programs to address the poverty and hopelessness that helped set the city aflame.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
The tang of good old-fashioned Westerns only improves with time. Appaloosa, a story of two lawmen who clean up the title town at some personal cost, goes down like a single-malt aged for 25 years - since that last defiantly traditional big-screen Western, Fred Schepisi's Barbarosa (1982). This one has the sweeping backdrop of New Mexico and the snap of a trampoline. Ed Harris, who directed and co-wrote it with Robert Knott from Robert B. Parker's novel, also stars as a lawman named Virgil Cole.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
SLAIN BY GUNMEN invading his home in Ibadan before Christmas, Bola Ige was a hero of Nigerian democracy. He had spent years in prison for it. The future of the country is bleaker for his death. Though Chief Ige lost to Olusegun Obasanjo in the 1999 election, as a leader of Yoruba people he joined the Obasanjo government, first as minister of power and steel and later as attorney general and justice minister. He tried through law to make Nigeria a functioning country, opposing the introduction of Shariah law by Muslim majorities in the north, championing federal over state control of oil reserves.
NEWS
By Bill Bishop | August 28, 1991
ON THE DAY of the coup that sent the Soviet Union teetering between democratic promise and a totalitarian past, the Committee for the State of Emergency in the Soviet Union issued a statement that is standard issue to American politicians.It was a law and order speech, plain and simple. The short text prepared by the coup leaders in fact contained the gist of themes that have won five of the past six American presidential elections.The instigators of the coup talked about "the mortal danger" that loomed over the country.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 7, 1992
IN THE LAST 104 years, there have been major eruptions of civil violence during the administrations of six presidents -- and in every case the incumbent's party lost the White House in the next election, as I reported last Monday.But many believe that the L.A. riots are going to help George Bush, and I think they are right. Because I believe that what happened after the last such riots in the late 1960s permanently transformed the Republicans into the Get-Tough-With-Criminals Party and the Democrats into the Get-at-the-Root-Causes-of-Crime Party.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | April 19, 1992
From The Sun April 19-25, 1842APRIL 19: The steamboats in the Delaware carried their flags at half-mast on Saturday and Sunday as a token of mourning on account of the late disaster in this city.APRIL 21: There is a vast amount of cant afloat about these days on the subject of law and order. In fact, if some editors are to be believed, one would suppose that there are no friends of law and order in the country.APRIL 22: Hon. Henry Clay -- This distinguished gentleman, and late Senator, arrived in this city last evening from Washington and took lodgings at Barnum's City Hotel.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 12, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South African police clashed with right-wing farmers near the conservative town of Ventersdorp yesterday when the white farmers tried to destroy a black squatter camp with their trucks.Police said two farmers were injured when hundreds tried to break through a police blockade protecting the squatters, who had moved back to land that was seized from them 13 years ago under apartheid laws.Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok said police opened fire on the farmers when they defied police orders and tried to advance on the squatter camp in about 50 trucks.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | July 12, 1991
Washington. The brave report by the Warren Christopher Commission about the Los Angeles cops' brutal beating of black motorist Rodney King may help to alleviate a terrible national problem. But I doubt it.As I first heard news of the commission's call for L.A. police chief Daryl Gates to step down because his force has ''a siege mentality,'' I happened to be reading a 1939 memo written by a 31-year-old lawyer in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Thurgood Marshall was warning his NAACP colleagues and blacks across the land 52 years ago that they had to take bold steps to prevent, or at least punish, those guilty of police brutality.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | February 5, 2008
You don't have to be an attorney, or even a regular viewer of Law and Order, to know that the military tribunals that take place at the Guantanamo prison camp are worlds away from what most Americans know as the criminal justice system. Sig Libowitz is an attorney - who, not so coincidentally, has also played one on Law and Order - but when he came across a transcript of a Guantanamo tribunal as a student at the University of Maryland Law School several years ago, it literally was an eye-opening experience.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz said yesterday that Israel's decision to let Palestinian police officers in the West Bank carry weapons again would help Palestinian authorities maintain law and order. Israel agreed Thursday to a request by beleaguered Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Ahmed Qureia to allow the use of guns on a provisional basis. "It will shore up the positive forces that want there to be order and who want to prevent anarchy in these places," Mofaz said during an interview on Israel Radio.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 20, 2003
PARIS - France's law-and-order interior minister has threatened to close any mosque in France that is considered extremist and expel any Muslim prayer leader who preaches a radical message. In an interview in Le Figaro published Thursday, the minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, also pledged to deny visas to Muslim participants in conferences who do not respect the values of the French state. "The Muslims are not above the law, but they are not below the law either," Sarkozy was quoted as saying.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
If it weren't so close to Baltimore - a city that charges admission to see its sewer pipes and boasts the world's largest collection of light bulbs - it might seem strange that the Maryland State Police have their own museum. Though you won't find it in any tour book, the three-room museum located next to state police headquarters on Reisterstown Road in Pikesville is one of Maryland's more entertaining shrines, largely because of its curator and tour guide, Peter Edge, whose sense of humor is legendary.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 16, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The young looter emerged from a burning warehouse yesterday, his face smeared with grease and his T-shirt soiled with soot. "I did not burn it," he shouted. "I just came to get some things." But Firas Zardish, 18 and slightly built, encountered an unexpected problem. An Iraqi police officer, tightly gripping the teen-ager's shoulder with one hand and holding a gun in the other, took him into custody. One arrest will not have a noticeable effect on lawlessness in the city, but it was a significant step for American authorities wanting Iraqi police to regain some semblance of control and end a month of almost uninterrupted looting and gunfire.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
SLAIN BY GUNMEN invading his home in Ibadan before Christmas, Bola Ige was a hero of Nigerian democracy. He had spent years in prison for it. The future of the country is bleaker for his death. Though Chief Ige lost to Olusegun Obasanjo in the 1999 election, as a leader of Yoruba people he joined the Obasanjo government, first as minister of power and steel and later as attorney general and justice minister. He tried through law to make Nigeria a functioning country, opposing the introduction of Shariah law by Muslim majorities in the north, championing federal over state control of oil reserves.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
For the first time in the history of the country, the United States government has officially come down on the side of a mob determined to prevent American citizens from exercising constitutional rights.That is the only conclusion one can draw from the action of the Department of Justice late yesterday in seeking to evade a federal judge's order in Wichita, Kan., enjoining anti-abortion groups from forcibly shutting down abortion clinics which are operating fully within the law.Make no mistake, the issue here is not abortion, nor is it the legitimate exercise of First Amendment rights of free speech or peaceable assembly.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | February 5, 2008
You don't have to be an attorney, or even a regular viewer of Law and Order, to know that the military tribunals that take place at the Guantanamo prison camp are worlds away from what most Americans know as the criminal justice system. Sig Libowitz is an attorney - who, not so coincidentally, has also played one on Law and Order - but when he came across a transcript of a Guantanamo tribunal as a student at the University of Maryland Law School several years ago, it literally was an eye-opening experience.
NEWS
September 8, 2001
WHETHER Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe will honor his commitment to undo violent seizures of white-owned farms, and substitute an orderly compensated redistribution, remains to be seen. His temptation to foment unrest to help him win re-election next April to another six-year term as president will be great. Despite, or because of, his 20 years in power, few believe he could stave off opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai's challenge in a fair and peaceful vote. But Zimbabwe agreed to the deal under pressure of other African members of the Commonwealth, the former British empire, who convened at Abuja, Nigeria's capital.
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