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TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | June 11, 2006
Lavender lovers will find themselves in a floral wonderland next weekend at the Pennsylvania Lavender Festival. The three-day celebration of the aromatic, purple flower will bloom at Willow Pond Farm in Fairfield, Pa. Visitors can stroll through the farm's 2.5 acres of lavender; hear discussions on the plant's medicinal aspects; learn about growing, harvesting and cooking with lavender; and hear the lecture "Lavender Lore and Other Herbal Mysteries."...
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Over the strong objections of Parkville community and business organizations, the Baltimore County Revenue Authority voted Thursday to sell a parking lot on Harford Road to a real estate developer who plans to build a drugstore on it. DMS Development LLC of Towson plans to buy the lot near Taylor and Lavender avenues for $530,000 and expects to begin construction in the fall of 2012. DMS Principal David M. Schlachman acknowledged during the Thursday morning meeting that the tenant would be a Walgreens drugstore, but he said in an interview later that the agreement with the national chain had not been signed.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 3, 2005
Charles Dance's Ladies in Lavender teams two of Britain's grandest dames, Judi Dench and Maggie Smith, in an endearing film of subtlety and charm. This lovely period picture, set in Cornwall in 1936, is a pleasure from start to finish. On a sunny summer day, a nearly drowned young man (Daniel Bruhl) is washed ashore on a craggy beach, where he is discovered by spinster sisters who share a fine old stone manor house on the cliff above. Dench's Ursula and Smith's Janet are leading quiet lives indeed, attended by their crusty but loyal housekeeper (Miriam Margolyes)
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
After working 32 years in the U.S. diplomatic corps, Tom and Madeline Wajda were looking to retire, but instead bought a farm in southern Pennsylvania and found a new business in the field of purple. Lavender, that is — and lots of it. So much that the couple created a festival in 2001 to celebrate the crop. Back then, a few hundred people showed up, but this year's Pennsylvania Lavender Festival, which begins Friday, is expected to draw 3,000 visitors for lectures, tours and weed walks.
FEATURES
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
If you think cooking with lavender must be like eating perfume, remember this: Lavender is an herb, a member of the mint family. Still wary? Well, Europeans have cooked with it for years, as part of the classic herbes de Provence mixture. And in recent years, lavender has become increasingly popular in American kitchens. Trend diva Martha Stewart includes recipes with lavender in her magazine and recently dedicated a show to lavender. The International Herb Association named it herb of the year for 1999.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 9, 2008
At first, I blamed my deeply discounted flat-screen TV. Then, I cursed my geriatric eyes. But no, independent analysis Sunday night confirmed that Ravens coach John Harbaugh and his staff were decked out in lavender jackets. Not deep, royal Ravens purple, a perfect complement to the rich, menacing Ravens black - colors that say "football" in these parts. Nope, lavender. As in "lavender blue, dilly dilly," a stupid lyric they made us learn in grade school that never made sense until I saw the Ravens' brain trust looking like a fan club for Tinky Winky Teletubby.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | December 9, 2008
Not only am I openly embracing the fact that Ravens coach John Harbaugh has decided to wear a lavender coat on the sideline, but I also want him to look even less macho next week when his team takes on the Pittsburgh Steelers. Seriously. I won't even object if he dresses up like a police officer from the Village People and sips white wine out of a Gatorade bottle. You know why? Because being the baddest dude on the block is all about attitude and results, not aesthetics. That's why one of my favorite Johnny Cash songs is "A Boy Named Sue."
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2003
For all its flowering beauty and seductive aroma, lavender has only recently been considered useful as a culinary herb, and has yet to make a splash in the beverage world. But if you take some time to understand this herb and learn how to coax out its best flavors, you might find it's worth the effort. Jo Asher grows a wide variety of culinary lavender at her Watercolor Lavender Farm in White Hall. This time of year, she is fond of gazing over her flowering fields while enjoying a sip of some drink infused with lavender, and she has some good advice on using the herb to quench a summer thirst.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Bryant and Elizabeth Bryant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
SIMIANE-LA-ROTONDE, France - Here and there in the highest plateaus of Haute Provence, the scent of heady lavender still mixes with sun-baked pine as tractors slice through the last of the season's purple flowers. At the sprawling farm of Alain Cassan, in the rolling hills of southeastern France, the harvest has ended. Trailers are stacked high with neatly tied bunches of lavender. In the coming weeks, they will be dried, packed in 45-pound burlap bags and shipped to dealers. The journey ends at trendy boutiques in New York or Paris, where the flowers are sold as dried bouquets or in perfumed sachets.
FEATURES
By Theresa Tamkins and Theresa Tamkins,Medical Tribune News Service | September 8, 1995
The wafting scent of lavender may put insomniacs to sleep just as well as tranquilizers do, a new study suggests.The study included four elderly people who had difficulty sleeping, and had been taking tranquilizers for up to three years. Researchers took them off the drugs, then infused the air with the scent of lavender.At first, the patients had trouble getting to sleep without the tranquilizers. But after the introduction of the lavender scent, they were able to sleep as well as they had when they were taking the drugs, according to the report, published this week in the medical journal Lancet.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | December 9, 2008
Not only am I openly embracing the fact that Ravens coach John Harbaugh has decided to wear a lavender coat on the sideline, but I also want him to look even less macho next week when his team takes on the Pittsburgh Steelers. Seriously. I won't even object if he dresses up like a police officer from the Village People and sips white wine out of a Gatorade bottle. You know why? Because being the baddest dude on the block is all about attitude and results, not aesthetics. That's why one of my favorite Johnny Cash songs is "A Boy Named Sue."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 9, 2008
At first, I blamed my deeply discounted flat-screen TV. Then, I cursed my geriatric eyes. But no, independent analysis Sunday night confirmed that Ravens coach John Harbaugh and his staff were decked out in lavender jackets. Not deep, royal Ravens purple, a perfect complement to the rich, menacing Ravens black - colors that say "football" in these parts. Nope, lavender. As in "lavender blue, dilly dilly," a stupid lyric they made us learn in grade school that never made sense until I saw the Ravens' brain trust looking like a fan club for Tinky Winky Teletubby.
NEWS
By JOE AND THERESA GRAEDON | September 15, 2008
Is it true that lavender oil can increase female hormones in men and boys? If so, shouldn't there be a warning on soaps, shampoos and shower gels? A lot of personal-care products have lavender fragrance, whether you notice it or not. Lavender does not increase female hormone levels in the body. Nevertheless, this herbal oil may act like estrogen on its own. The lavender link was brought to public attention in the New England Journal of Medicine (Feb. 1, 2007). Researchers reported that three boys developed enlarged breasts (gynecomastia)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 24, 2008
Lyfe Jennings R&B singer Lyfe Jennings comes to Baltimore on his first-ever tour, "Baby I'm a Star." The up-and-comer has filled venues like the Apollo Theater in New York City and the Superdome in New Orleans with his soulful voice and lyrics that serve as keen social commentary, born out of a 10-year stay in prison. Unlike previous releases, Jennings' newest album, Lyfe Change, includes collaborations with different producers, creating a new sound. Ray Lavender, Yolanda Renee and DJ P Funk join Jennings on Sunday at Sonar, 407 E. Saratoga St. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25-$30.
FEATURES
June 5, 2007
Proud of your petunias? Love your lavender? Tomorrow is the last day to submit your entries to The Sun's garden contest. Please send three glossy photos or jpegs, along with a brief description of your garden, to liz.atwood@baltsun.com or Liz Atwood, Lifestyles Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278. With the help of local gardening experts, we'll select the best to be featured in the Modern Life section in early July. Amateur gardeners only, please.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | December 29, 2006
Aromatherapy -- the use of plant oils to improve well-being -- sounds lovely, doesn't it? How wonderful if a whiff of lavender could make you feel drowsy, or a little dab of rosemary oil could relieve muscle pain. There's certainly a plausible biological basis for the idea that smells can have direct effects on the body. On the yucky side, for instance, nothing makes me nauseous faster than the odor of those pine tree-shaped air fresheners that taxi drivers hang in their cabs. On the positive side, there's nothing like the scent of a fresh Christmas tree to evoke warm memories of childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Cooke and Lori Sears | June 17, 2004
Working vacation Are you looking for an unusual vacation this summer? The organizers of the "Ultimate Vacation: Watching Other People Work" in York, Pa., have just the idea for you. York, tabbed the "Factory Tour Capital of the World," will open 20 of its factories' doors for free tours now through Saturday. Sample potato chips, see how a Harley is made, watch how clay is turned into dinnerware and even wear a hard hat and protective goggles while touring some factories. The event takes place today through Saturday in York, Pa. Free.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
Forget daffodils and robins. It isn't really spring in Maryland until the azaleas bloom. While they're sometimes called the "royalty of the garden," azaleas are not so much dignified queens as fairy princesses tripping through the woodlands and across shade-dappled lawns in frothy lavender, mauve, pink, white, apricot, crimson and butter yellow dresses. "They only last a few weeks," notes Jane Baldwin, president of the Cylburn Arboretum Association, "but they are absolutely gorgeous." All azaleas are rhododendrons (though not all rhododendrons are azaleas)
TRAVEL
November 5, 2006
IF YOUR DOG IS A TERRIBLE TRAVELER on car trips, aromatherapy may help calm your pet -- and you. THE TOP 100 MOST BEAUTIFUL RUSTIC VACATIONS OF NORTH AMERICA Rusty Duck Press / $22.95 If you're looking for a restful spot off the beaten path, this paperback book is for you. Author Dusty Dave -- real name unknown -- has profiled rugged mountain cabins, dude ranches and lush lakefront lodges across the United States, Mexico and Canada. He lists prices, activities and contact information to ease vacation planning.
NEWS
By Virginia A. Smith and Virginia A. Smith,McClatchy-Tribune | October 8, 2006
It's autumn, and the garden's bathed in a whole new light: softer, grayer and especially flattering to silver plants, otherwise known as horticulture's ultimate drama queens. They demand attention whatever the season, but seem to glow this time of year. You see it in the frosty spires of Russian sage, the fluttery underside of butterfly bush and the somber stalks of meadow rue. From barely white to gleaming blue, silver plants move from brash and radiant in August to demure and luminous in the fall.
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