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By Harry West and Harry West,Special to The Sun | February 6, 1994
Thirty years ago, if developers wanted to build a championship golf course in an exotic locale, the Kohala Coast on the Big Island of Hawaii would have been the last ground to be broken.Yet, today it's one of the world's prime places to play the game.The transformation has been a work of art. Centuries ago, the coast area was devastated by lava flows, the molten rock laying waste to everything in its path. There was no soil left, just heaps of refuse from the bowels of the Earth. The fury unleashed by Pele, the goddess of the volcano, had missed only a few stretches of pristine coastline.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | May 16, 2012
He toils in relative obscurity now, a beer-and-a-shot horse in the champagne world of big-time racing. This week he's in Barn D, Stall 19 at Pimlico Race Course , right next door to Kentucky Derby winnerI'll Have Another, but light years from the spotlight he once enjoyed. This is the great Lava Man, now the stable pony that will escort I'll Have Another to the Preakness starting gate Saturday for trainer Doug O'Neill. But what a back-story this pony has. It's like something out of a Hollywood movie, really.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 11, 1999
I don't know what the guy who programmed the LAVA! Music Video Player was smoking, but it's obvious he never exhaled.In fact, the first time I saw this silly but delightful Windows program, I was transported back 30 years, when light shows and psychedelic images helped define the 1960s musical counterculture. The 20-somethings who demonstrated the program couldn't understand why I was chuckling."Hey," I told them, "if we'd had this stuff when I was in college, we never would have exhaled, either."
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 7, 2012
Why is Doug O'Neill, trainer of Kentucky Derby winner I'll Have Another, not accompanying his horse to Baltimore today to begin preparation for the May 19 Preakness? Does he not know of our reputation for crab cakes? Has he not heard that the hottest team in baseball plays just a few miles from Pimlico? Is he offended that the drinking preference of race-day patrons swings so drastically from fine bourbon to even finer Boh for the second leg of the Triple Crown? O'Neill, a trainer who has the look and mannerisms of a high school football coach in his native Michigan, is back in California.
NEWS
By Martin Merzer and Martin Merzer,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1991
HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii -- Today's nomination for worst job in America: mail carrier to the volcanoes.Six days a week, mail sacks bulging with slivers, chunks and sometimes bricks of lava are dragged into the ranger station on the edge of Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes in the world.More lava is the last thing this moonscape of a place needs, and more work is the last thing the rangers need. But still the lava comes -- all of it returned to the source, more or less, by star-crossed tourists desperate to lift the "Curse of Pele."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1997
PASADENA, Calif. -- Sojourner, the pint-size robot geologist, has taken the first chemical fingerprint of a rock on Mars and determined that it resembles the lava found on the Andes mountains.Significantly, the 8-inch-high rock known as "Barnacle Bill" shows signs of repeated heating and melting, an indication that the red planet stayed warm longer than scientists previously thought.This is another bit of evidence supporting the theory that Mars was once warm, wet and possibly hospitable to primitive life.
FEATURES
April 29, 1998
Meet Ivan Rodriguez Catcher Ivan "Pudge" Rodriguez of the Texas Rangers has led the American League in throwing out runners five of the past seven seasons. "I don't even try stealing on him anymore," says New YorYankee Chuck Knoblauch, one of the A.L. 's top base-stealers. Ivan was a short, pudgy kid, which is why a Little League coacnicknamed him Pudge. He grew up to be only 5-foot-9, but he has won six Gold Gloves and is a six-time All-Star! Pub Date: 4/29/98 Tim Hardaway of the Miami Heat once made his elementary school classroom red hot. Why?
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | December 13, 1998
As the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft slips closer and closer to its assigned orbit, scientists find their plates are overflowing with exciting data, stuff they have barely been able to taste, much less digest.Even before the big spacecraft settles into its circular path around the red planet by March, the new photos it is sending home are forcing researchers to rethink some older ideas. For example: Although Mars was known to be a very windy place, the new evidence suggests it's windier yet, so the terrain is probably more rapidly remodeled than expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Ryan and James Ryan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1998
The Virtual Pet Cemetery (www.lavamind.com/pet.html) is one of the more oddly compelling Web-side attractions to have sprung up along the Internet.A million or so visitors find their way there each year to gawk at the eulogies posted in loving memory of Misty the Brown Mutt or Moretta and Her Kittens. Most visitors probably are unaware that they have been flagged down by a larger-than-life roadside attraction, like a Paul Bunyan statue. Once there, perhaps the tourist will stop by the gift shop and make a purchase.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Six months after NASA's Messenger spacecraft began orbiting the planet nearest the sun, scientists have spotted a vast lava field at Mercury's north pole, weird sinkholes around some craters, and reason enough to throw out most theories for how the planet formed. "In-orbit is definitely the place to be," said James Head III, a Brown University geologist on the team. Messenger cameras looking down from a polar orbi have revealed surface details that could not be seen during three previous flybys, or by the Mariner 10 mission in 1974-1975.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Six months after NASA's Messenger spacecraft began orbiting the planet nearest the sun, scientists have spotted a vast lava field at Mercury's north pole, weird sinkholes around some craters, and reason enough to throw out most theories for how the planet formed. "In-orbit is definitely the place to be," said James Head III, a Brown University geologist on the team. Messenger cameras looking down from a polar orbi have revealed surface details that could not be seen during three previous flybys, or by the Mariner 10 mission in 1974-1975.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 29, 2006
For a while, it seemed as though Antigone Rising would never get off the ground. Now, how will the band ever come down? Years of constant touring paid off for the all-female rock band when, earlier this month, Antigone Rising was chosen to open for the Rolling Stones. (The tour stops Wednesday night for a sold-out show at 1st Mariner Arena. ) Talk about your bigger bang. "Our booking agency had been petitioning on our behalf for a while," says Antigone Rising's mono-monikered lead vocalist Cassidy, who's calling from New York City.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2005
A Memorable Place After a hard climb, a volcanic show By Cynthia Garner Special to the Sun It was New Year's Day when my 64-year-old father and I embarked on a climb of the active Pacaya volcano in Guatemala. It was my father's first trip outside the United States in nearly 40 years. As an environmentalist and amateur geologist, he was thrilled by the possibility of seeing lava at the summit. Just before we arrived at Pacaya Volcano National Park, we saw the Fuego volcano erupt in the distance, and Dad was beside himself with excitement, shouting and trying to get a picture.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
This is the super-secret lottery vault." It's 90 minutes before Tuesday's lunchtime picks, and Patrick Morton, the 35-year-old drawing manager for the Maryland State Lottery Agency, is only half joking as he hovers over a small keypad deep inside the studios of WJZ-TV. Beside the keypad is a large metal door -- locked, alarmed, monitored by camera. With a quick peek over his shoulder, he briskly taps in a code known only to four others at the agency. Then he slides a key into the door and swings it open.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | May 15, 2005
Do your own home makeover The hunkiest man in a tool belt has just designed his own line of home products. Handyman Ty Pennington, design team leader on the show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, has created a full collection of bedding, bath and tabletop products for Sears stores. Ty Pennington Style features seven lines -- Caliente Stripe, Bali Hai, Lemongrass, Red Dragon, Chocolatte, Plum Crazy and Luscious Lava -- each filled with cool and casual, unique and practical home items. Stylish and affordable, each includes bedding sets, rugs, pillows and valances, bath towels, shower curtains, vases, lamps and candleholders, flatware, dishes, place mats and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 13, 2004
As she walks the streets of New York City on a "really pretty" afternoon, Toby Lightman talks about pushing herself. The pop newcomer is on her cell phone, discussing her debut, Little Things: the music and her involvement in its creation. "You get one chance, and there is no turning back," says Lightman, who plays the 9:30 Club tonight and the Recher Theatre tomorrow. "I was in the studio every day coming up with the parts, playing the guitar or telling people which parts to play. I was into the whole process."
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | November 29, 1992
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. -- At the start of Chain of Craters Road, the distant lights evoked a city, sprawling across a hillside and twinkling orange at night.The road turned through a barren landscape, where under the glare of a full moon, the earth churned in a rocky, craggy mass. Down and down, the land flattened, and that lunar face, grease-paint white, rose higher and higher in the blue-black sky. And in the descent, the air, once alpine crisp, warmed like breath in my ear.I was driving to see the volcano, the Kilauea Crater, birthing bed of goddess Pele.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Ernest Lawrence Dinning III, former vice president of the Maryland Lava Co. and an avid sailor, died of multiple organ failure Monday at Beebe Memorial Hospital in Lewes, Del. He was 77. Mr. Dinning, who was known as "Laury," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He attended McDonogh School until enlisting in the Navy during World War II. He served as a boatswain aboard destroyers in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean, and on a mine sweeper in the China Sea and Yangtzee River. Returning to Baltimore after his discharge in 1946, Mr. Dinning went to work for Harford Talc Co. in Dublin, which had been established in 1933 by his grandfather.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Ernest Lawrence Dinning III, former vice president of the Maryland Lava Co. and an avid sailor, died of multiple organ failure Monday at Beebe Memorial Hospital in Lewes, Del. He was 77. Mr. Dinning, who was known as "Laury," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He attended McDonogh School until enlisting in the Navy during World War II. He served as a boatswain aboard destroyers in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean, and on a mine sweeper in the China Sea and Yangtzee River. Returning to Baltimore after his discharge in 1946, Mr. Dinning went to work for Harford Talc Co. in Dublin, which had been established in 1933 by his grandfather.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
Imagine opening your morning paper to find that "evildoers" had landed on an American shoreline, left four people dead, burned homes and churches, ignited forest fires and unleashed the nation's worst single source of air pollution. All those calamities have been visited on the southeastern coast of the Big Island of Hawaii, not by terrorists, but by a continuing eruption of the Kilauea volcano. Now in its 20th year, it is the longest sustained eruption since Westerners began keeping track more than 200 years ago. The latest outburst began May 12, Mother's Day, when a 2,000-degree river of lava began oozing from the Pu'u `O'o crater on Kilauea's southeast flank and pouring downhill toward the sea. When it crossed the severed Chain of Craters highway, it gave tourists unusually easy access.
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