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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
Lauryn Hill is returning to the area for some redemption. After a disappointing performance at Rams Head Live at the start of the year, Hill will again try to win over regional crowds with a show at the Warner Theater in DC February 29. Hill, of course, does not have new material to promote. If the Rams Head show was any indication, she'll play a mix of hers and the Fugees' old hits. Tickets, starting at $55 for the upper balcony and set at a whopping $150 for the so-called golden circle, go on sale December 30. Baltimore's Weekends are going on tour early in the new year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | November 13, 2012
After the disappointing culling last week, we're down to the final 12, and from here on out, only audience votes will help our favorites move through -- no more coaches' saves. I'm running out of things to say about these musicians, so here's how it works this week: vote for your favorites. If they make the cut, they make the cut. If they don't, they don't, and since this is entirely in your hands, dear audience, it's entirely likely that a coach will NOT have a representative in the final rounds.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 6, 1999
When Lauryn Hill, Sheryl Crow, Shania Twain and Madonna garnered the most mentions as the Grammy nominations list was announced yesterday, the spin most commentators took was that 1999 would be yet another "Year of the Woman" for the music business.Don't be fooled. This ballot's big trend wasn't about gender -- it was about genre.Despite an abundance of women on the ballot, what the Recording Academy is ultimately endorsing has less to do with Sisterhood in Song than with the stylistic fluidity of today's pop market.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
If you ever wanted to get inside Omar's head, here's your best shot. Actor Michael K. Williams, who played everyone's favorite gay hitman on "The Wire," has just shared with New York Magazine the songs that he'd play to get himself in the Omar mood. It's hip-hop heavy, for sure. But what else would it be -- Barry Manilow? “Music is always a part of my characters' make-up,” he told New York. “All my characters have playlists.” Williams told the magazine he carefully curates the list, making sure he picks just the right tunes for each character.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 25, 1999
Some years, the Grammy broadcast feels like a roller-coaster ride, hurtling us from shock to thrill with no sense of what's next.But not this year.It was a quiet night, with little in the way of surprises and suspense. Celine Dion won Record of the Year for the "Titanic" hit, "My Heart Will Go On," and the song itself was named Song of the Year.Needless to say, her victory was no surprise to anyone who saw last year's Academy Awards show.Lauryn Hill, who was nominated for 10 awards, took home five, including Album of the Year, Best New Artist, Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, Best R&B Song and Best R&B album.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1999
Let's play a round of Name That Star, shall we? Here are the clues: She's a hip-hop artist as celebrated for her singing as for her rapping. She started out as a member of a group, but didn't really make a name for herself until after she went solo and MTV put her video into heavy rotation. Praised as a paragon of pop feminism, she's proud of the role motherhood has played in her artistic life.Oh, and she had her first hit in 1989.If you answered former Fugees member Lauryn Hill, you're a few years off. Because five years before Hill -- then just a member of the Fugees -- hit the pop charts with "Nappy Heads," Neneh Cherry had a Top-Five hit with "Buffalo Stance."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 18, 1999
Lauryn Hill may be one of the biggest stars in popular music at the moment, but there's something decidedly small-scale about the live show she brought to Washington on Tuesday.Instead of opting for one night at a more arena-sized venue, Hill decided to play three shows at the more intimate DAR Constitution Hall (the final, sold-out performance is this evening). Rather than dazzle her audience with a splashy stage design, she took a low-key approach to the visuals, decorating the stage with just some prop school lockers (it was the "Miseducation" tour, after all)
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 26, 1999
Yes, Hillary Clinton is ineligible to run for mayor of Ballmer, but a bill before the legislature would rectify that.The best team in baseball will merge with the worst in basketball. That's the cable game for you.The Alps have too much snow and Merlin has too much Pfiesteria. Swap?Pop quiz for the over-30 set: Who is Lauryn Hill and what did she do?Pub Date: 2/26/99
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
If you ever wanted to get inside Omar's head, here's your best shot. Actor Michael K. Williams, who played everyone's favorite gay hitman on "The Wire," has just shared with New York Magazine the songs that he'd play to get himself in the Omar mood. It's hip-hop heavy, for sure. But what else would it be -- Barry Manilow? “Music is always a part of my characters' make-up,” he told New York. “All my characters have playlists.” Williams told the magazine he carefully curates the list, making sure he picks just the right tunes for each character.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 5, 2006
THE GRAMMY AWARD FOR ALBUM OF THE YEAR IS THE LAST award given out during the ceremony, so you could say it's the most highly anticipated. Imagine how the nominees feel as they sit through two hours of long, slow monologues, bombastic performances and tearful acceptance speeches, waiting to find out if their peers really liked their albums. Of course, it's hard to predict which artist at the 48th Grammy Awards ceremony, to be broadcast Wednesday on CBS, will walk away with the evening's most coveted prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
Lauryn Hill is returning to the area for some redemption. After a disappointing performance at Rams Head Live at the start of the year, Hill will again try to win over regional crowds with a show at the Warner Theater in DC February 29. Hill, of course, does not have new material to promote. If the Rams Head show was any indication, she'll play a mix of hers and the Fugees' old hits. Tickets, starting at $55 for the upper balcony and set at a whopping $150 for the so-called golden circle, go on sale December 30. Baltimore's Weekends are going on tour early in the new year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 14, 2006
I wanted nothing but music. Every year for Christmas, Mama outdid herself, buying just about everything on the "wish lists" my two sisters and I put together immediately after Thanksgiving. Although Mama bought me clothes, board games, Hot Wheels and other things, I only cared about the records. All the other stuff was pushed aside as I tore the plastic off the new LPs. Now as a grown single man with no kids, Christmas has lost that magical glow. I don't expect gifts, and I only buy for a few close friends and relatives.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 5, 2006
THE GRAMMY AWARD FOR ALBUM OF THE YEAR IS THE LAST award given out during the ceremony, so you could say it's the most highly anticipated. Imagine how the nominees feel as they sit through two hours of long, slow monologues, bombastic performances and tearful acceptance speeches, waiting to find out if their peers really liked their albums. Of course, it's hard to predict which artist at the 48th Grammy Awards ceremony, to be broadcast Wednesday on CBS, will walk away with the evening's most coveted prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON and RASHOD OLLISON,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2004
I'M TALKING to the back of John Legend's head. We're in a car driven by a promotions guy from Columbia Records, the R&B singer's label. John chills in the passenger seat, which cramps my knees in the back. But I say nothing as we pull away from D.C.'s Hotel Helix, where I met the guys. The ride to Howard University's Cramton Auditorium, where John is due for a sound check, is a short one. The Ohio-bred singer-musician, whose blues-suffused voice belies his 25 years, arrived in town barely two hours ago. And he's scheduled to perform at the school's homecoming later tonight.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 18, 2001
''There was a time when the beauty products we have now were nowhere to be had," Susan Taylor, editor of Essence magazine, writes in the introduction to the new book "The Essence Total Makeover: Body, Beauty, Spirit" (Three Rivers Press, $18) by Patricia Mignon Hinds. "The only lab creating cosmetics for women of color was the one we set up in our own kitchens. ... Today we have choices." From its inception 30 years ago, Essence has been all about expanding the choices African-American women have in both their well-being and way of life.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 1999
Most acts on TV live in mortal fear of being "too hip for the room" -- that is, working off cultural references most squares wouldn't get.That's not an issue on MTV. Much of what gets airtime on MTV may sail right over the heads of average Americans (especially if they're over the age of 25), but within its own rarefied frame of reference, it's almost impossible to be too hip for MTV.But Lord knows, the Video Music Awards broadcast last night tried.With comedian Chris Rock as host, airing live from New York's Metropolitan Opera House (!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 21, 1999
Critics may carp that the Grammy Awards are overly commercialized and under-representative of musical quality, but one thing they're not is predictable.Just look at this year's ballot. Even though the artists earning the most nominations were all women -- Lauryn Hill, Sheryl Crow, Shania Twain and Madonna -- this year's Grammy race is more about genre than gender, as most of the major nominees owe their success to having crossed over from a pop pigeonhole to the anything-goes mainstream.That may be why the Grammy guessing game has grown harder in recent years.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 1999
Most acts on TV live in mortal fear of being "too hip for the room" -- that is, working off cultural references most squares wouldn't get.That's not an issue on MTV. Much of what gets airtime on MTV may sail right over the heads of average Americans (especially if they're over the age of 25), but within its own rarefied frame of reference, it's almost impossible to be too hip for MTV.But Lord knows, the Video Music Awards broadcast last night tried.With comedian Chris Rock as host, airing live from New York's Metropolitan Opera House (!
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 6, 1999
If you were to look up the term "critics' darling" in the dictionary, odds are you'd find a photo of Lucinda Williams.A singer and songwriter whose specialty is literate, emotionally charged country rock, Williams (who performs at Shriver Hall Sunday) has been making records for just over two decades now. Not that the average pop fan would know; of the six albums she's recorded, only one -- last year's "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" -- ever cracked the Billboard album chart.In fact, the closest she ever came to making a dent in the mainstream was in 1993, when Mary Chapin Carpenter cut a version of her song "Passionate Kisses."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 18, 1999
Lauryn Hill may be one of the biggest stars in popular music at the moment, but there's something decidedly small-scale about the live show she brought to Washington on Tuesday.Instead of opting for one night at a more arena-sized venue, Hill decided to play three shows at the more intimate DAR Constitution Hall (the final, sold-out performance is this evening). Rather than dazzle her audience with a splashy stage design, she took a low-key approach to the visuals, decorating the stage with just some prop school lockers (it was the "Miseducation" tour, after all)
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