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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
In a cool bit of timing, "Thurgood," George Stevens Jr.'s vivid one-actor play about the first African American Supreme Court justice, is in Washington as senators are pondering the nomination of Thurgood Marshall's former law clerk, Elena Kagan, for a seat on the highest bench in the land. Add in all the talk onstage about interpreting the 14th Amendment and other civil rights cases, and the show exudes a remarkably contemporary feel (Rand Paul might pick up some useful perspectives from it)
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 16, 2014
I used to get blamed all the time for stuff Bob Steinback said. To be fair, it wasn't always blame -- sometimes it was credit -- and it went both ways. Sometimes, he had to explain to people that it was not he who had written a certain thing, but me. Robert L. Steinback was, as I was and still am, a columnist for The Miami Herald, and and we shared a certain superficial physical similarity, both of us bearded, bald and black. That said, we really didn't look a lot alike. For one thing, I wear glasses and Bob doesn't.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
American television is generally awful when it comes to talking about race. Afraid of possibly offending anyone and absolutely terrified of tackling complex subject matter, most networks and major cable channels have come to largely avoid the topic in recent years — even during Black History Month. That timid TV backdrop is part of what makes HBO's "Thurgood," which debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday, such a special program. The film version of the one-man play starring Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, the Baltimore-born civil rights attorney and the first black Supreme Court justice,l is one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV. But that exploration of African-American identity is only of several factors that distinguishes this production written and produced by 14-time Emmy-winner George Stevens Jr., of " Kennedy Center Honors" acclaim.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
American television is generally awful when it comes to talking about race. Afraid of possibly offending anyone and absolutely terrified of tackling complex subject matter, most networks and major cable channels have come to largely avoid the topic in recent years — even during Black History Month. That timid TV backdrop is part of what makes HBO's "Thurgood," which debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday, such a special program. The film version of the one-man play starring Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, the Baltimore-born civil rights attorney and the first black Supreme Court justice,l is one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV. But that exploration of African-American identity is only of several factors that distinguishes this production written and produced by 14-time Emmy-winner George Stevens Jr., of " Kennedy Center Honors" acclaim.
FEATURES
July 27, 2006
Critic's Pick--Ike and Tina Turner are the subjects of What's Love Got to Do With It (9:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m., TMC), with Laurence Fishburne, above.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2006
Where were you on that terrible June night when Robert Kennedy was assassinated? More importantly, what did you think after you heard about it? Bobby is a lament of what might have been. It is not a history lesson; those looking to explore the events of June 5-6, 1968, should look elsewhere. It does not offer insight into the mind of his assassin, Sirhan Sirhan, or touch upon the myriad conspiracy theories that since have arisen. It does not delve into RFK the man, or look at the political climate or examine the times in which he lived.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 19, 1996
Flee "Fled."A dispiritingly violent action "comedy," it squanders the great Laurence Fishburne in a low-rent attempt to turn him into exactly what he should not even consider being -- the next Wesley Snipes.Still impressive with his brooding good looks and simmering masculine power, Fishburne, even slumming, is the only impressive thing in the coarse, gunfight-crazed movie. Think "The Defiant Ones" with guns as rewritten by a nasty 12-year-old and you've got the project nutshelled.As we meet them, Fishburne and punky little Stephen Baldwin are convicts in the Georgia Penal System, serving on a road gang, who have been punitively chained together.
NEWS
February 19, 2009
Series My Name Is Earl:: Darnell's (Eddie Steeples) father (Danny Glover) visits and says he wants to make amends with his son. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation:: Langston (Laurence Fishburne) testifies at the trial of a respected congressman, but new evidence threatens to put the case in jeopardy. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Grey's Anatomy:: Derek and Addison try to save a pregnant patient's life. (9 p.m., WMAR-Channel 2) Hell's Kitchen: : The contestants learn about cuts of beef in a meat locker.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
It's no accident that the four cinematic treatments of Shakespeare that purists love most are Grigori Kozintsev's Russian-language "Hamlet" and "King Lear," and Akira Kurosawa's Japanese fantasias on "Lear" ("Ran") and "Macbeth" Throne of Blood").Without Shakespeare's sacred, inviolable text, we can enjoy these movies without comparisons to the originals. Even the finest English-language film treatments -- Olivier's "Henry V," "Richard III" and "Othello" -- have been subject to mean-spirited quibbling from the Shakespearean Comintern.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 19, 2005
There ought to be a law limiting how much hooey a movie serves up. Assault on Precinct 13 asks you to believe that one bad guy can kill another with a pen to the neck during Mass without anyone noticing; that cops would chase someone into a church, guns blazing, also in the middle of Mass; that a rogue SWAT team can attack a downtown building, guns still blazing, without anyone, not even local news crews, noticing; that 75-year-old Tommy guns still sit,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
In a cool bit of timing, "Thurgood," George Stevens Jr.'s vivid one-actor play about the first African American Supreme Court justice, is in Washington as senators are pondering the nomination of Thurgood Marshall's former law clerk, Elena Kagan, for a seat on the highest bench in the land. Add in all the talk onstage about interpreting the 14th Amendment and other civil rights cases, and the show exudes a remarkably contemporary feel (Rand Paul might pick up some useful perspectives from it)
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
The most direct road to old Baltimore next week might run through Washington. Actor Laurence Fishburne takes to the stage at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday to perform the title role in "Thurgood," a one-actor play about the first African-American appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. And, as Fishburne embodies Thurgood Marshall delivering a lecture on his life at Howard University, audiences will also get a glimpse into the city where the future justice grew up. Theatergoers will meet Marshall's formidable grandmother, Annie, who launched possibly the first sit-down strike ever held in the city from her grocery store at the corner of Dolphin and Division streets.
NEWS
February 19, 2009
Series My Name Is Earl:: Darnell's (Eddie Steeples) father (Danny Glover) visits and says he wants to make amends with his son. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation:: Langston (Laurence Fishburne) testifies at the trial of a respected congressman, but new evidence threatens to put the case in jeopardy. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Grey's Anatomy:: Derek and Addison try to save a pregnant patient's life. (9 p.m., WMAR-Channel 2) Hell's Kitchen: : The contestants learn about cuts of beef in a meat locker.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 29, 2008
'Hairspray' sequel won't have John Travolta kicking up his heels anymore Hold onto your beehives, Baltimore, John Travolta says he won't reprise his role as Edna Turnblad in the Hairspray sequel. "I think once is enough," Travolta, 54, told the Sunday Herald Sun of Sydney, Australia. "I did it and I did it well, but I'm not a big sequel guy." That's not what Perez Hilton recalls. On his Web site he notes these Travolta films: Look Who's Talking Too and Staying Alive. The Hairspray sequel, written by John Waters, is projected for a summer 2010 release.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2006
Where were you on that terrible June night when Robert Kennedy was assassinated? More importantly, what did you think after you heard about it? Bobby is a lament of what might have been. It is not a history lesson; those looking to explore the events of June 5-6, 1968, should look elsewhere. It does not offer insight into the mind of his assassin, Sirhan Sirhan, or touch upon the myriad conspiracy theories that since have arisen. It does not delve into RFK the man, or look at the political climate or examine the times in which he lived.
FEATURES
July 27, 2006
Critic's Pick--Ike and Tina Turner are the subjects of What's Love Got to Do With It (9:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m., TMC), with Laurence Fishburne, above.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Horror movies began as low-budget bloodfests and have come to this: multimillion-dollar bloodfests.With high production values and low aspirations, "Event Horizon" begins as a mildly intriguing science-fiction movie and degenerates into yet another slasher flick about evil from another dimension.Sam Neill, who has starred in a number of ambitious films and got a taste of popular stardom in "Jurassic Park," must have been crazy or broke to sign up for this trip. Same with the usually compelling Laurence Fishburne, Kathleen Quinlan ("Apollo 13")
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Laurence Fishburne always knew he was onto a good thing with Akeelah and the Bee. The hard part was finding a studio that agreed. "We went around and tried to find a distributor and financing. We took lots and lots and lots of meetings," Fishburne says of the inspirational drama in which he plays Joshua Larabee, the demanding mentor to a young contestant in a national spelling bee. "And, finally, Lionsgate stepped up and said, `Yeah, we'll help you finance it.' And then this company called 2929 Films said, `Yeah, we'll help you, too.' It was a long and drawn-out process."
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