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Laura Schlessinger

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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 8, 2000
The doctor is looking sickly. In Baltimore, as elsewhere, sluggish ratings and a persistent public relations campaign waged by gay activists have prevented Laura Schlessinger's fledgling television talk program from gaining a secure foothold. Now, CBS is shifting the program from the afternoon to early morning spots (such as 2 a.m.) on the local stations it owns that broadcast the show. Those stations can be found in the largest metropolitan areas in the country, such as New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago.
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By David Hinckley and David Hinckley,McClatchy-Tribune | February 26, 2007
A year into his new gig at Sirius Satellite Radio, Howard Stern has a lot more money, a fiancee and what he says is far greater peace of mind. What he doesn't have, according to trade magazine Talkers, is his former stature as the most important talk radio host in America. Talkers' annual "Heavy Hundred" list drops Stern from the No. 1 spot last year to No. 12. "He's still doing very well," says Michael Harrison, editor of Talkers. "But this list is about what's hot - and you just don't hear about Stern the way you did before he went to satellite.
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By Adam Pertman and Adam Pertman,BOSTON GLOBE | July 2, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Lee is sobbing.Five years ago, she explains, she left her husband at the urging of her minister. The experience left her so depressed that she had to be hospitalized and, as a result, she lost primary custody of her two young children.She's better now, but she'd like some guidance about how to deal with the feelings of guilt and distress that still grip her periodically."Do you have a sense of when you choose to bring this out and beat yourself with it?" Laura Schlessinger, talk radio's fastest-rising star, asks her caller.
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By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Bad Childhood - Good Life: How to Blossom and Thrive in Spite of an Unhappy Childhood By Laura Schlessinger HarperCollins Publishers/2006/$24.95 If you like Dr. Laura, read this and you'll come away liking her more. If you don't like her, you might find yourself softening a bit. In her book, Bad Childhood - Good Life, radio personality Laura Schlessinger uses personal stories from listeners to delve into the murky waters of childhood trauma. She illustrates how some troubled people get stuck in destructive patterns, while others overcome abuse to lead productive lives.
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By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Bad Childhood - Good Life: How to Blossom and Thrive in Spite of an Unhappy Childhood By Laura Schlessinger HarperCollins Publishers/2006/$24.95 If you like Dr. Laura, read this and you'll come away liking her more. If you don't like her, you might find yourself softening a bit. In her book, Bad Childhood - Good Life, radio personality Laura Schlessinger uses personal stories from listeners to delve into the murky waters of childhood trauma. She illustrates how some troubled people get stuck in destructive patterns, while others overcome abuse to lead productive lives.
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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 12, 2000
Protesters denounced the debut of the new Laura Schlessinger talk show yesterday at demonstrations in Baltimore and across the country, saying the tough-love counselor has offered her radio listeners a steady diet of hatred toward gays. For an hour yesterday morning, more than 45 picketers waved homemade signs yesterday at the York Road offices of WMAR (Channel 2) to decry the station's decision to air the program. "Dr. Laura is broadcasting misinformation about gay people in general, and that does a lot of damage," said Tim Hurley, president of the Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore.
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By David Hinckley and David Hinckley,McClatchy-Tribune | February 26, 2007
A year into his new gig at Sirius Satellite Radio, Howard Stern has a lot more money, a fiancee and what he says is far greater peace of mind. What he doesn't have, according to trade magazine Talkers, is his former stature as the most important talk radio host in America. Talkers' annual "Heavy Hundred" list drops Stern from the No. 1 spot last year to No. 12. "He's still doing very well," says Michael Harrison, editor of Talkers. "But this list is about what's hot - and you just don't hear about Stern the way you did before he went to satellite.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 6, 2000
Radio talk show host Dr. Laura wants me to introduce myself this way: "Hi. My name is Susan, and I'm my kids' mom." That's what she expects from her women callers. We're supposed to let the world know right off that our children come first and that we define ourselves in terms of our relationship to them. If we have trouble getting the words out, we can go online to drlaura.com and buy a T-shirt or a sweatshirt that will announce it for us. And if we have trouble understanding why this should be so, we can read all about our selfish and neglectful selves in her new book, "Parenthood by Proxy: Don't Have Them If You Won't Raise Them," a mean-spirited indictment of working mothers.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | April 25, 2004
THIS IS GOING TO COME AS a nasty shock to those who know me, and to those who are sure they do, but I think Dr. Laura Schlessinger might be on to something. The blunt and conservative talk radio phenomenon has churned out yet another book, and even its title is designed to irritate: The Proper Care & Feeding of Husbands (HarperCollins, $24.95). Feminists can be counted on to pull their hair out in handfuls at what this title suggests. And men are going to feel more like the family pet than the lord of the realm.
FEATURES
August 3, 1996
In his prime, Earl Weaver could be loud, profane and abusive. And that was around his friends. To umpires, he was the manager they loved to hate. To Jim Palmer, he was Napoleon, only shorter. And tomorrow, they put him in the baseball Hall of Fame as one of the winningest managers of all time.Well, there have been lots of good managers, but only one who could come up with this exchange. Outfielder Pat Kelly wanted to lead a chapel meeting in the clubhouse, but Weaver objected. Said Kelly: "Earl, don't you want me to walk with the Lord?"
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By Susan Reimer | April 25, 2004
THIS IS GOING TO COME AS a nasty shock to those who know me, and to those who are sure they do, but I think Dr. Laura Schlessinger might be on to something. The blunt and conservative talk radio phenomenon has churned out yet another book, and even its title is designed to irritate: The Proper Care & Feeding of Husbands (HarperCollins, $24.95). Feminists can be counted on to pull their hair out in handfuls at what this title suggests. And men are going to feel more like the family pet than the lord of the realm.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 8, 2000
The doctor is looking sickly. In Baltimore, as elsewhere, sluggish ratings and a persistent public relations campaign waged by gay activists have prevented Laura Schlessinger's fledgling television talk program from gaining a secure foothold. Now, CBS is shifting the program from the afternoon to early morning spots (such as 2 a.m.) on the local stations it owns that broadcast the show. Those stations can be found in the largest metropolitan areas in the country, such as New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 12, 2000
Protesters denounced the debut of the new Laura Schlessinger talk show yesterday at demonstrations in Baltimore and across the country, saying the tough-love counselor has offered her radio listeners a steady diet of hatred toward gays. For an hour yesterday morning, more than 45 picketers waved homemade signs yesterday at the York Road offices of WMAR (Channel 2) to decry the station's decision to air the program. "Dr. Laura is broadcasting misinformation about gay people in general, and that does a lot of damage," said Tim Hurley, president of the Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 6, 2000
Radio talk show host Dr. Laura wants me to introduce myself this way: "Hi. My name is Susan, and I'm my kids' mom." That's what she expects from her women callers. We're supposed to let the world know right off that our children come first and that we define ourselves in terms of our relationship to them. If we have trouble getting the words out, we can go online to drlaura.com and buy a T-shirt or a sweatshirt that will announce it for us. And if we have trouble understanding why this should be so, we can read all about our selfish and neglectful selves in her new book, "Parenthood by Proxy: Don't Have Them If You Won't Raise Them," a mean-spirited indictment of working mothers.
FEATURES
By Adam Pertman and Adam Pertman,BOSTON GLOBE | July 2, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Lee is sobbing.Five years ago, she explains, she left her husband at the urging of her minister. The experience left her so depressed that she had to be hospitalized and, as a result, she lost primary custody of her two young children.She's better now, but she'd like some guidance about how to deal with the feelings of guilt and distress that still grip her periodically."Do you have a sense of when you choose to bring this out and beat yourself with it?" Laura Schlessinger, talk radio's fastest-rising star, asks her caller.
NEWS
By Richard Roeper | December 14, 1998
UNLIKE the Academy Awards or the Tonys or the Emmys, there's never a shortage of deserving nominees when it comes time for the annual GOOF (Greatly Overhyped and Overexposed Fool) Award.Last year's winner was Jerry Springer. The year before that, it was Dennis Rodman. You get the idea.Before we crown our winner, let's pay tribute to some of the 1998 nominees.-- Oprah Winfrey. For singing her own theme song, for hammering us over the head with her charitable greatness, for making the nearly unwatchable bomb "Beloved," and for the New Age nuttiness on her show that threatened to drive away a good portion of even her most devoted fans.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
Were the '70s really a huge waste of time best left forgotten? Don't jump to any conclusions before watching VH1 tonight."The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- In a repeat from two years back, the Woman With the Most Irritating Voice in the World runs into Corbin Bernsen, once the World's Sleaziest Lawyer. Only this time he's not Arnie Becker, but rather hot-dog hawker mistaken for a stockbroker. CBS."Dr. Laura Schlessinger on Character, Courage and Conscience" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
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