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Laura Lippman

FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 5, 2012
September's a big month for bibliophiles, as Baltimore and Washington stage their book festivals. And this year, for the first time in recent years, the festivals don't fall on the same weekend, allowing readers to catch both packed slates of authors and events. The National Book Festival, held on the Mall, kicks off first, on Sept. 22-23. The event always has a star-studded lineup, and this year it includes Thomas Friedman, T.C. Boyle, Geraldine Brooks, Robert A. Caro, Sandra Cisneros, Patricia Cornwell, Junot Diaz, Charlaine Harris, Walter Isaacson, Jeff Kinney, Marilynne Robinson, and Mario Llosa Varga.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
New York Times best-selling author George Saunders will headline the 10 t h annual CityLit Festival this Spring. Saunders, the recipient of a MacArthur Award Fellowship, commonly known as a "genius" grant, has written four short story collections. The most recent, "Tenth of December," was reviewed this weekend in the New York Times' Sunday book review. Critic Gregory Cowles described him as "one of the most gifted, wickedly entertaining story writers around. " Saunders will read from his collection at the Enoch Pratt Free Library 's Central branch on April 13. Other well-known writers who have been featured in previous years at the annual book-lovers festival include Pulitzer Prize winning author Edward P. Jones; Laura Lippman, creator of the fictional private investigator Tess Monaghan, and "Sex and the City" author Candace Bushnell.
NEWS
May 19, 2009
What are lessons of Healthy Howard? A single payer health care system is the only solution. NotableMA single payer will face the same problems the multiple private payers of today face - doctors terrified of being sued ordering expensive and unnecessary tests to stave off malpractice attorneys; patients who want approval and payment for every technological advancement that comes around so that they can be saved from the jaws of death; hospitals that...
NEWS
March 22, 2008
Parkville Man charged with threatening O'Malley After undergoing a court-ordered psychiatric evaluation, a Parkville man charged this week with threatening to kill Gov. Martin O'Malley was released yesterday and placed on home detention to await trial. Walter C. Abbott Jr., a 44-year- old construction worker, was arrested Tuesday after allegedly sending an e-mail to the governor's official Web site in which he threatened to strangle O'Malley. Abbott had previously sent e-mails to O'Malley in which he expressed frustration with the governor's immigration policies and their effect on his ability to get construction work, but had never received a real response.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
There's something wonderfully mysterious about Baltimore. Edgar Allan Poe, America's first great mystery writer, lived, wrote and died here, and this richly diverse city on the bay has provided personalities and backdrops for dozens of great reads by masters of the genre. Dashiell Hammett based two of his early novels on his experience working at the Baltimore branch of the Pinkerton Detective Agency. Raymond Chandler mentions Baltimore in Farewell, My Lovely, and James M. Cain, who worked at the Baltimore News American, featured Baltimore in The Enchanted Isle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Baltimore novelist Laura Lippman's husband, David Simon, once suggested that she write a novel based on the real-life disappearance of local gambling kingpin Julius "The Lord" Salsbury. Naturally, she ignored him. "David saw the story with a reporter's heart and intellect," said Lippman, who, like Simon, is a former reporter for The Baltimore Sun. "He still has this passion for fact and investigation and getting the real story. When he brought me Julius Salsbury, he said, 'Maybe you'll figure out where he went.' " Salsbury fled the state in 1970 while awaiting the outcome of his appeal on a federal gambling conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Redding and Judith Redding,Special to the Sun | July 10, 2005
Novel To the Power of Three By Laura Lippman. William Morrow. 436 pages. To the Power of Three is no simple whodunit that takes a high school shooting as its starting point. Veteran Baltimore mystery writer Laura Lippman takes a break from her P.I. Tess Monahan novels to study the social pressures bearing on teenagers in an upper-middle-class suburban development. Kat Hartigan, the daughter and granddaughter of the housing development's planners, has been groomed to succeed, to be the best, to fulfill her father's foiled dream of going to Stanford.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Heloise Lewis wears several hats. She's a prostitute who runs an escort business. She's a single mom who voraciously reads classic literature and has a close relationship with her 11-year-old son. And she's entangled with a murderer who also happens to be a drug dealer, a crime boss and, although he doesn't know it, her son's father. Meet the quirky but troubled protagonist of Laura Lippman's novel, "And When She Was Good," which looks at women's issues and at the sorry effects of murder, mayhem and drugs.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 11, 2013
As the Baltimore Ravens and Denver Broncos get ready for their big playoff game Saturday, there are plenty of opinions about how the teams and cities compare . But in one competition -- based on books -- Baltimore wins hands down. The East Coast city had the advantage of time and history, of course, and in literary matters, that can be a big edge. Denver didn't get its start until the mid-1800s, when word of a gold strike brought settlers to the banks of the South Platte River.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
An interview with Angie Engles, facilitator of a book club at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library. The club is called the Savage Mystery Book Club and periodically changes its name when the group focuses on different genres. What book are members reading this month? Last time we met, we decided we would read Agatha Christie books and Dorothy Sayers books and sort of get a feel for the older mysteries. ... At first, we were going to have everyone read the same book, and then we decided to read books from both authors.
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