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Laura Lippman

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Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
For 13 years, Baltimore's Laura Lippman, creator of the Tess Monaghan private-eye series, has shown mystery fans that high-caliber writing is more potent than full-bore gunplay. But a new wave of media interest, and the release Tuesday of her most ambitious nonseries novel yet — the harrowing, impassioned "I'd Know You Anywhere" — suggest that Lippman, 51, is on the verge of breaking out to bigger audiences as a master storyteller, not just a master of her genre. If it all comes through, her work will soon be ubiquitous.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Baltimore novelist Laura Lippman's husband, David Simon, once suggested that she write a novel based on the real-life disappearance of local gambling kingpin Julius "The Lord" Salsbury. Naturally, she ignored him. "David saw the story with a reporter's heart and intellect," said Lippman, who, like Simon, is a former reporter for The Baltimore Sun. "He still has this passion for fact and investigation and getting the real story. When he brought me Julius Salsbury, he said, 'Maybe you'll figure out where he went.' " Salsbury fled the state in 1970 while awaiting the outcome of his appeal on a federal gambling conviction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
The pungent, haunting narrative of Laura Lippman's new novel, "The Most Dangerous Thing," kicks in with a group of kids arguing for dibs on a grassy kickball field near a cotton mill on "Wetheredsville Road. " The whole scene sounds like a cozy nostalgia trip. But that patch of grass really does exist - in Charm City, no less - in isolated, rustic Dickeyville. Lippman grew up there, and "The Most Dangerous Thing" is full of vivid backgrounds and behavior - some factual, some imagined - pulled from or inspired by the youth she spent in this improbable neighborhood on the western edge of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 11, 2013
As the Baltimore Ravens and Denver Broncos get ready for their big playoff game Saturday, there are plenty of opinions about how the teams and cities compare . But in one competition -- based on books -- Baltimore wins hands down. The East Coast city had the advantage of time and history, of course, and in literary matters, that can be a big edge. Denver didn't get its start until the mid-1800s, when word of a gold strike brought settlers to the banks of the South Platte River.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 17, 2009
Laura Lippman was just on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, promoting her new book, Life Sentences. Ferguson asked if she sees much of another famous Baltimorean, John Waters. "Yeah, well, I'll tell the story because it was outed in the newspaper," she said. "We tried to keep it secret. John Waters was my minister. He married us." "Us" being Lippman and Wire creator David Simon. Ferguson needed a moment to get over his shock, but it's true: The Pope of Trash is a man of the cloth, ordained by the Universal Life Church, an outfit that sells minister's licenses by mail order.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 5, 2007
Asemiregular cast of characters drifts into Viva House in West Baltimore, quietly taking seats on folding chairs at long metal tables. They've come for the free lunch: hot dogs, salad and beans, plus a bonus sandwich to go. "I haven't been here for a month," says one of their servers, a tall, loose-limbed woman with femme-fatale blond hair. "I feel awful." If you go Laura Lippman will sign copies of her book, What the Dead Know, at 7 tonight at Borders Books & Music, 170 W. Ridgely Road, Timonium.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout | January 12, 1997
"Baltimore Blues" by Laura Lippman. Avon Books. 290 pages. $5.95. paper.Laura Lippman's first book, in which a 29-year-old ex-reporter named Tess Monaghan turns amateur detective in order to save the neck of a buddy, is two first novels in one: a tough-minded murder mystery and a funny, rueful tale of love and longing. The whodunit part is fast-moving and nicely cynical, but it's the wry subplot (not to mention the dead-on touches of local color) that makes "Baltimore Blues" both entertaining and unexpectedly touching.
NEWS
September 16, 1997
Laura Lippman, reporter at The Sun, will talk about her second Baltimore-based mystery novel, "Charm City," as part of the library's series, "Write from Maryland!" at 7 p.m. Sept. 23 at the East Columbia branch.Information or registration: 410-313-7700.Pub Date: 9/16/97
NEWS
December 20, 2009
Morning Books with Coffee will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Howard County Library's East Columbia branch, 6600 Cradlerock Way. The book to be discussed is "What the Dead Know" by Laura Lippman. All are welcome. Call 410-313-7762 for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 10, 2000
"The Sugar House," by Laura Lippman (William Morrow, 320 pages, $24). Laura Lippman is a Sun reporter, a treasured colleague and a serial mysterian, This is her fifth intricated Baltimore-based, newspaper-tinted whodunit. There is no way that appears on these pages -- by me or anyone else -- is likely to be taken as coldly objective. But I shall tell you this: The earlier Tess Monaghan mysteries have been vastly and justly lauded, and I found this one at least as strong and attention devouring as its predecessors.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 5, 2012
September's a big month for bibliophiles, as Baltimore and Washington stage their book festivals. And this year, for the first time in recent years, the festivals don't fall on the same weekend, allowing readers to catch both packed slates of authors and events. The National Book Festival, held on the Mall, kicks off first, on Sept. 22-23. The event always has a star-studded lineup, and this year it includes Thomas Friedman, T.C. Boyle, Geraldine Brooks, Robert A. Caro, Sandra Cisneros, Patricia Cornwell, Junot Diaz, Charlaine Harris, Walter Isaacson, Jeff Kinney, Marilynne Robinson, and Mario Llosa Varga.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Heloise Lewis wears several hats. She's a prostitute who runs an escort business. She's a single mom who voraciously reads classic literature and has a close relationship with her 11-year-old son. And she's entangled with a murderer who also happens to be a drug dealer, a crime boss and, although he doesn't know it, her son's father. Meet the quirky but troubled protagonist of Laura Lippman's novel, "And When She Was Good," which looks at women's issues and at the sorry effects of murder, mayhem and drugs.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | August 17, 2012
Laura Lippman 's latest, "And When She was Good," is out this week, the latest from Baltimore's favorite mystery writer. Here's a review from Celeste Sollod, a book publishing veteran who writes about Baltimore literary life at BaltimoreBookTalk.com (You can also follow her on Twitter @BaltimoreBooks): Heloise Lane, protagonist of Laura Lippman's new stand-alone psychological thriller, "And When She Was Good", is one of the most complex characters the prolific author has created.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
The pungent, haunting narrative of Laura Lippman's new novel, "The Most Dangerous Thing," kicks in with a group of kids arguing for dibs on a grassy kickball field near a cotton mill on "Wetheredsville Road. " The whole scene sounds like a cozy nostalgia trip. But that patch of grass really does exist - in Charm City, no less - in isolated, rustic Dickeyville. Lippman grew up there, and "The Most Dangerous Thing" is full of vivid backgrounds and behavior - some factual, some imagined - pulled from or inspired by the youth she spent in this improbable neighborhood on the western edge of Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
For 13 years, Baltimore's Laura Lippman, creator of the Tess Monaghan private-eye series, has shown mystery fans that high-caliber writing is more potent than full-bore gunplay. But a new wave of media interest, and the release Tuesday of her most ambitious nonseries novel yet — the harrowing, impassioned "I'd Know You Anywhere" — suggest that Lippman, 51, is on the verge of breaking out to bigger audiences as a master storyteller, not just a master of her genre. If it all comes through, her work will soon be ubiquitous.
NEWS
December 20, 2009
Morning Books with Coffee will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Howard County Library's East Columbia branch, 6600 Cradlerock Way. The book to be discussed is "What the Dead Know" by Laura Lippman. All are welcome. Call 410-313-7762 for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publishers Weekly | March 8, 2009
tuesday Revenge of the Spellmans : by Lisa Lutz (Simon & Schuster, $25) Private investigator Isabel Spellman is back on the case and back on the couch - in court-ordered therapy after getting a little too close to her previous subject. She reluctantly takes the case of a suspicious husband who wants his wife tailed, thinking it will be easy work. But with each passing hour, Izzy finds herself with more questions than hard evidence. Life Sentences : by Laura Lippman (William Morrow, $24.99)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2009
Life Sentences By Laura Lippman William Morrow / 352 pages / $24.99 Cassandra Fallows must determine whether Calliope Jenkins killed her infant son. Fallows, the hero of the latest stand-alone mystery from best-selling author Laura Lippman, is a middle-aged writer who grew up in Northwest Baltimore. Brimming with bright chatter, Lippman's engaging standalone novel evokes nostalgia for 1960s and '70s Baltimore as it traverses neighborhoods and landmarks like Bolton Hill, Mount Vernon and Silber's Bakery.
NEWS
May 19, 2009
What are lessons of Healthy Howard? A single payer health care system is the only solution. NotableMA single payer will face the same problems the multiple private payers of today face - doctors terrified of being sued ordering expensive and unnecessary tests to stave off malpractice attorneys; patients who want approval and payment for every technological advancement that comes around so that they can be saved from the jaws of death; hospitals that...
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 17, 2009
Laura Lippman was just on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, promoting her new book, Life Sentences. Ferguson asked if she sees much of another famous Baltimorean, John Waters. "Yeah, well, I'll tell the story because it was outed in the newspaper," she said. "We tried to keep it secret. John Waters was my minister. He married us." "Us" being Lippman and Wire creator David Simon. Ferguson needed a moment to get over his shock, but it's true: The Pope of Trash is a man of the cloth, ordained by the Universal Life Church, an outfit that sells minister's licenses by mail order.
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