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Laura Bush

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By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 31, 2004
NEW YORK -- Laura Bush smiled gamely for the news cameras as she took the controls of a quilting machine at a shop in Waite Park, Minn., and started stitching. She was on a campaign visit to Gruber's Quilt Shop, in the middle of a presidential battleground state, to promote her husband's economic policies in a fittingly ladylike way -- by showing her domestic side at a small business owned and run by women. What the pictures didn't show was that Laura Bush, 57, the former schoolteacher who has built a reputation as a quintessentially traditional first lady, wasn't quilting at all. The machine had run out of thread.
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BUSINESS
Nick Tann, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
Rebel Wilson shines, confuses and titillates while hosting last night's 2013 MTV Movie Awards as tax-paying procrastinators struggled to submit their returns on a temporarily floundering TurboTax online. In gun control news, a sadly ironic turn of events took place at the first 500 Sprint Cup race sponsored by the NRA as a NASCAR fan shot himself in the head after an apparent argument with a fellow racing fan.  Other trends this morning involve the first grandchild for George W. and Laura Bush, the strains of running the Boston Marathon and the release of the first full trailer for the second "Hunger Games" movie, "Catching Fire.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - It is the rite of passage for all first ladies: picking the personal cause. Yesterday, Laura Bush joined in the tradition, announcing early childhood education as her signature issue and promising to use her celebrity to promote it. She marked the occasion at Cesar Chavez Elementary School in Hyattsville with a speech, a visit with students and an enthusiastic reading of the book "If You Give a Pig a Pancake." With flashbulbs popping, Bush stepped into her shoes as national education pitchwoman with the poise of a glammed-up substitute teacher, smiling in a periwinkle blue suit under a sign promising "Reading is Fun."
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 26, 2008
Laura Bush to write memoir; tonight she'll show off White House First lady Laura Bush is making lots of news herself these days. Yesterday, she confirmed to the Associated Press that she is planning to write a memoir and has met with publishers. "I've been talking to some publishers, but nothing has happened yet - just a few visits," she said in a telephone interview. While Nancy Reagan famously settled scores with old foes such as former White House chief of staff Donald T. Regan in My Turn, Bush has vowed to write a positive book, with a minimum of criticism, according to one publishing executive with knowledge of the meetings with the first lady.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
Dozens of curious onlookers peeked from street corners and behind yellow police tape in hopes of snapping a picture or getting a handshake, but second-grader R.J. Hargett was unimpressed when he learned the first lady of the United States would be visiting his Brooklyn school yesterday. "He's 7 years old. People don't excite him," said his father, Robert. Then, she showed up. Not only did R.J. and 20 of his classmates at Baltimore's Maree Garnett Farring Elementary hear Laura Bush read a book, teach a vocabulary lesson and introduce a faraway land called Ethiopia.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's then-chief of staff tried to persuade the president to fire Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on at least two occasions in the past two years, once with the support of first lady Laura Bush, according to a new book by author and journalist Bob Woodward. The first of the attempts by Andrew H. Card Jr., made in November 2004, was thwarted by Vice President Dick Cheney, a longtime friend of Rumsfeld's, and Karl Rove, the White House political chief, who felt that any move against Rumsfeld would be seen as an acknowledgment that the Iraq war was on the wrong course.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
BETHESDA - Praising him as a strong leader and good friend of the White House, first lady Laura Bush helped Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. raise $250,000 last night for his re-election campaign. Bush said she follows Maryland politics and the Ehrlich administration closely, and has been impressed with the governor's commitment to education and other causes affecting children. She urged the 200 donors at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center to do everything they can to ensure that the state's first Republican governor in a generation gets a second term.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 31, 2005
KABUL, Afghanistan - After flying from Washington to the other side of the world, first lady Laura Bush spent six hours in Afghanistan yesterday, praising the courage of Afghan women and pledging more U.S. help for the war-torn country. She shook the hands of many Afghan women, some of whom shyly held scarves across their faces. She told them how happy she was to meet them, and she wished them all good luck. "I bring the very best wishes of the American people," she told a discussion group at the new women's teacher-training institute in Kabul.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
NEW YORK - True to her slow-but-sure style evolution, Laura Bush took in a runway show at fashion week here yesterday, a first for the wife of a sitting president (even if her view did lack the typical fashion week fare of visible thongs and brazen bralessness). The first lady sat in the front row of the Red Dress Collection, a benefit intended to raise awareness about heart disease among women, and applauded steadily as a roster of tastefully clad celebrity models teetered before her. Next to Bush sat Carolina Herrera, who created the red velvet jacket and slim skirt the first lady wore yesterday, and near Oscar de la Renta, who created her ballgown for last month's inauguration.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | September 21, 2005
Before she could even read, she remembers, her mother, Jenna Welch of Midland, Texas, lulled her to sleep many a night by reading aloud from Little Women. This summer, she made her way through three biographies, an epic on life in the Ukraine, and Marilynne Robinson's newest novel, Gilead, in which a 77-year-old preacher recounts his life and times for his 7-year-old son. For Laura Bush, reading has always offered links to the past, a passage to worlds unknown, and a way of coming home again - a ticket to a richer life.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | November 6, 2008
A golden November day under a blue sky and an air of sweet amiability at the polls and at the end of the day, we elected the right guy, no doubt about it. Yes, we can, and we did. A nation spread its wings and achieved altitude. Bravo, Barack Obama, Mr. Steady, who cheerfully did the rope lines, made the phone calls, answered the same questions 15,000 times, bounded up the stairs, delivered his lines with warmth and wit, ran a tight, disciplined army, and that, plus $700 million and an 80 mph wind at your back, is all you need to win the prize.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | November 1, 2007
JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia -- There's no substitute for being there, as has been illustrated by the reaction to an image of Laura Bush's alleged abaya-wearing incident during her recent visit to the Middle East. Unlike most who have commented, I was there. The controversial photo shows Mrs. Bush donning a black headscarf decorated with the iconic pink bows signifying breast cancer awareness. It was the only time Mrs. Bush covered her head during the trip, and the episode lasted perhaps a minute.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,sun reporter | October 21, 2007
President Bush traversed the Chesapeake Bay on an invigorating fall morning yesterday, announcing conservation measures for migratory birds while on the west side of the waterway and for striped bass on the east before getting in some fishing himself. At the national Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, the president promoted policies he said would protect habitat for 800 bird species that need resting places as they fly south for the winter and return when warm weather returns. After a helicopter ride to St. Michaels, Bush unveiled an initiative to make red drum and striped bass, known locally as rockfish, more available to sport fishermen but less accessible as a commercial catch.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | June 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is locked in a struggle to preserve his signature education initiative as Republicans and Democrats press for key changes in the law that ushered in an era of high-stakes testing and strict standards. The No Child Left Behind Act took effect in 2002 after receiving the kind of bipartisan support that has all but evaporated since. It will expire this year unless it is renewed or extended. With his time in office waning, Bush regularly refers to the education reform act as one of his most notable achievements, and one that he hopes will endure.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | May 30, 2007
Washington-- --The Mystery of the Time-Traveling Sleuth. Attractive, golden-tressed teenage actress Emma Roberts and her stalwart sidekick, first lady Laura Bush, were hot on the trail. They were seeking to uncover clues that explain the continuing appeal of the fictional teenage sleuth Nancy Drew. After all, the first book in the series was published in 1930 under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene, though about a dozen authors contributed manuscripts. Dozens of titles have been published, and hundreds of millions of copies have been sold worldwide, though a spokesman for Simon & Schuster couldn't provide specific figures.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | May 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- No detail can be overlooked when British royalty visits the White House, from the tempo of marches played by the Air Force band to the polish on gilded flatware laid out for the state dinner. And no amount of planning can compensate for a presidential slip of the tongue. President Bush welcomed Queen Elizabeth II yesterday during her fifth visit to the United States. But he got the date of one of the trips wrong before catching himself, adding two centuries to the queen's age as well as the country's.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Gerard Shields and Ellen Gamerman and Gerard Shields,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 1, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - After hearing Laura Bush deliver her first national political speech at the Republican convention last night, delegates concluded that the wife of presidential hopeful George W. Bush is the campaign's new secret weapon. "I was so pleasantly surprised," said John Hammond, 46, an Indianapolis lawyer. "None of us had really ever heard her talk before - I don't think anybody really knows her - and this was so revealing. "I think she's the hidden asset for George W. Bush." Laura Bush, who once made her husband promise she would never have to give a political speech, impressed delegates with her calm before the cameras and personal stories they said put a human face on a family that the country is just getting to know.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
When Laura Bush set out for Afghanistan yesterday, it was a wonder she didn't borrow her husband's now infamous flight suit. En route to a war-torn nation the president himself has not yet visited, Laura Bush unleashed opinions on subjects she is apparently passionate about. On the tarmac of Maryland's Andrews Air Force Base, she declared solidarity with Afghan women and stressed the importance of educating them. On board, she defended how the government intervened in the Terri Schiavo case.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 23, 2006
HOUSTON -- Southern Methodist University has all but won the competition to host a $200 million George W. Bush presidential library. Officials announced this week that the school will be the "sole focus" of talks next month. That means the two other finalists - Baylor University and the University of Dallas - will wait on the sidelines as the selection committee enters what chairman Don Evans in a statement called the "next phase of deliberations." A final decision could come in late January or early February.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's then-chief of staff tried to persuade the president to fire Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on at least two occasions in the past two years, once with the support of first lady Laura Bush, according to a new book by author and journalist Bob Woodward. The first of the attempts by Andrew H. Card Jr., made in November 2004, was thwarted by Vice President Dick Cheney, a longtime friend of Rumsfeld's, and Karl Rove, the White House political chief, who felt that any move against Rumsfeld would be seen as an acknowledgment that the Iraq war was on the wrong course.
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