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By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | September 28, 1990
LONDON (AP) -- Laura Ashley, hailed as a great British retailing success story until falling on hard times, said yesterday that it will sell or close most of its factories and cut its work force by one-fifth in an effort to survive.The retailer of English country-style women's clothing and home furnishings operates nearly 500 stores worldwide, 185 of them in the United States.Its shops, recognizable by their dark-green fronts and blackberry-sprig motif, are best known for their flower-print, Victorian-style dresses.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Baltimore's homespun glamour gal Julie Bowen is Lucky's April covergirl, looking chic in a pink blazer and lots of gold accessories. Inside, the "Modern Family" star tells the magazine that her new stylist -- who also styles the ever-trendy Kristen Stewart of "Twilight" -- has been pushing her to step up her game. "It was a big evolution in style for me to grow up and say 'I need to take fashion seriously for my job,'" Bowen told Lucky. "I have a stylist now, and she's trying to get me to wear more revealing stuff.
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By Elaine Markoutsas | December 13, 1992
Few homeowners are in a position to decorate from scratch, according to Mark Winstanley, design manager for Laura Ashley primary products. And even though Laura Ashley catalogs sell room sets that feature bed linens, wall coverings, decorative pillows, and china coordinated with lamp shades and furniture, the company feels many of its products can be integrated with existing furnishings to update a look. Mr. Winstanley offers these ideas:* Use cushions as a smart, inexpensive way to refresh a room.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
SIR BERNARD ASHLEY, 82 Co-founder of Laura Ashley brand Sir Bernard Ashley, who teamed up with his wife to build the Laura Ashley fashion and home furnishing brand into a global business, died Saturday at his home in the Elan Valley in Wales, his family said Monday. The cause of death was not announced. Sir Bernard had the business acumen that propelled his wife's flair for nostalgic designs into a thriving business. He married Laura Mountney in 1949. Inspired by a trip to Italy in 1953, she designed some head scarves.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
SIR BERNARD ASHLEY, 82 Co-founder of Laura Ashley brand Sir Bernard Ashley, who teamed up with his wife to build the Laura Ashley fashion and home furnishing brand into a global business, died Saturday at his home in the Elan Valley in Wales, his family said Monday. The cause of death was not announced. Sir Bernard had the business acumen that propelled his wife's flair for nostalgic designs into a thriving business. He married Laura Mountney in 1949. Inspired by a trip to Italy in 1953, she designed some head scarves.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Baltimore's homespun glamour gal Julie Bowen is Lucky's April covergirl, looking chic in a pink blazer and lots of gold accessories. Inside, the "Modern Family" star tells the magazine that her new stylist -- who also styles the ever-trendy Kristen Stewart of "Twilight" -- has been pushing her to step up her game. "It was a big evolution in style for me to grow up and say 'I need to take fashion seriously for my job,'" Bowen told Lucky. "I have a stylist now, and she's trying to get me to wear more revealing stuff.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Ecologically clean"Clean & Green" is printed on recycled paper with vegetable-based ink. That's how committed the publisher, Ceres Press, is to this word-of-mouth best seller that extols the virtues of living, or at least cleaning, in an ecologically sound way.Author Annie Berthold-Bond, aka the Green Heloise, has written an encyclopedic guide to nontoxic, environmentally friendly housekeeping, including recipes to replace synthetic cleaning products....
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
Laura Ashley in TowsonThose who miss the Laura Ashley store that closed in Harborplace will be glad to know that a new one is opening in Towson Town Center in July. You'll find it on the fourth level next to Cachet near Nordstrom. At the same time the company will be celebrating its 40th anniversary, and the anniversary home furnishings collection for fall-winter should be in the stores by August.The anniversary collection's fabrics, wall coverings and borders are recreations of early designs or are from previously unpublished designs in Laura Ashley's archives.
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By Lynn Williams | August 18, 1991
In rare cases, a single name can conjure up an entire lifestyle. So it is with "Laura Ashley." These two words are suggestive of all that is feminine and refined and English: windows draped in rose-patterned chintz, the discreet rattle of flowered tea cups in drawing rooms, porcelain-skinned young women in garden-party dresses and picture hats.So who is this radical dude in shades, wearing an outrageous orange-sherbet outfit and a mischievous grin?Nick Ashley, 34-year-old son of the late Laura Ashley and Sir Bernard Ashley, is heir to one of the design world's most influential fashion and home-design empires, a company that all but invented (to the American mind, anyway)
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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1999
Laura Ashley Newton liked to draw little pictures of Teletubbies, and would slip them into neighbors' mail slots every morning. She liked to sweep Gilmor Street clean of trash in front of her small red-bricked rowhouse. She liked to talk about school.But the 10-year-old autistic child also liked to sneak out of her second-story bedroom window, climb down from a small porch roof and run around the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood. So her mother put up metal bars to keep her daughter safe.That gated window created a death trap Sunday afternoon, when fire raced through the narrow home.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1999
Laura Ashley Newton liked to draw little pictures of Teletubbies, and would slip them into neighbors' mail slots every morning. She liked to sweep Gilmor Street clean of trash in front of her small red-bricked rowhouse. She liked to talk about school.But the 10-year-old autistic child also liked to sneak out of her second-story bedroom window, climb down from a small porch roof and run around the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood. So her mother put up metal bars to keep her daughter safe.That gated window created a death trap Sunday afternoon, when fire raced through the narrow home.
TRAVEL
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Just east of Charlottesville, Va., in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Keswick Hall at Monticello stands as a testament to the power of fantasy.From the outside, it's a villa in Tuscany. Indoors, it is something else again -- a 48-room luxury hotel decked out in Laura Ashley fabrics and an eclectic collection of antiques, offering a lifestyle experience most often associated with the rich and famous.For $330 -- the price for a room with unlimited one-day golfing for one -- we get breakfast free, so Keswick could be defined as a B&B. But this is no just-folks kind of place.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | May 10, 1998
Warm breezes waft insideIt's not the season, it's the style: summer colors, summer lightness, summer textures are hot as Ocean City in a heat wave on the decorating scene these days.* "Light colors and summery furniture make small rooms feel larger," says Home magazine in its May issue, which displays an 1,100-square-foot guest house in Texas where the furniture is wire and wicker, the floors are limestone like a patio and all the backgrounds are white.* Interior designer Trudy Dujardin, who lives in Connecticut and on Nantucket Island, tells American Homestyle & Gardening magazine that when she decorates, "my colors come from the surroundings" - blue sky, gray fog, bleached white seashells.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
Whether it's the tiny florals and neat geometrics of Laura Ashley or the lush botanicals of F. Schumacher or the clean lines of a Windsor chair, there's something about English style that is familiar, comfortable and instantly recognizable.And certainly in the mid-Atlantic states, there's plenty of it around. So when the Maryland Historical Society was considering themes for its 20th annual antiques show and sale this weekend at the Boumi Temple, a celebration of British design influence seemed right on target.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | March 9, 1997
A FEW WEEKS AGO I opened this newspaper to TC depressing sight: a photo of the Williams-Sonoma sign coming down at Owings Mills Mall.The accompanying story confirmed what I'd been trying to deny since before Saks Fifth Avenue left, as artsy housewares shops and unique boutiques gave way to stores with red discount signs in the windows. Owings Mills isn't Baltimore's answer to New York any more. The Gucci days are gone.In industry parlance, the mall is being ''repositioned.'' In plain language, that means the classy stores that carried the stuff I finally can afford to buy full-price once in a while couldn't make it and are being replaced by the likes of Sunglass Hut International and Pay-less Shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 29, 1996
Some Eastern Shore towns may close up for the winter, but not St. Michaels. And certainly not the luxurious Inn at Perry Cabin. Just try getting a last-minute dinner reservation there on a Saturday night, even in February.The Inn at Perry Cabin is one of a group of hotels owned by Sir Bernard Ashley and his wife, Laura. That's why it's decorated from tip to toe with those tiny floral prints Laura Ashley is famous for.Most of us can't afford to stay there except for a very special occasion.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | September 27, 1992
Not every bathroom, even if it's about to be renovated, needs to conform with the model of a high-tech, 21st century bathing environment.In fact, I personally am none too fond of those sleek and gleaming settings that often look as though they belong on a spaceship rather than in a down-to-earth home. Count me as someone who regards bathing as a luxurious ritual, a floating escape from the strictures of time and the toils of the workaday world.I want my bathroom to reflect and enhance that mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 29, 1996
Some Eastern Shore towns may close up for the winter, but not St. Michaels. And certainly not the luxurious Inn at Perry Cabin. Just try getting a last-minute dinner reservation there on a Saturday night, even in February.The Inn at Perry Cabin is one of a group of hotels owned by Sir Bernard Ashley and his wife, Laura. That's why it's decorated from tip to toe with those tiny floral prints Laura Ashley is famous for.Most of us can't afford to stay there except for a very special occasion.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 20, 1993
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Emma Jean Siple, Baltimore: If any one in the whole wide world believed there was a female cosmic parent to help start the Creation like I do, I have never heard of them.If Adam and Eve were given birth by God's wife, and if the fact had been revealed, she would have been the Supreme Goddess.Who was Mrs. God?But women, with the exception of the Virgin Mary, were created to fill a special role in life: that of homemaker, pleasing her husband, raising a family, having grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | July 20, 1993
Starbucks opening perks up airportForget Southwest Airlines. Baltimore-Washington International Airport has landed a tenant that'll really wake you up.Starbucks Corp., the Seattle-based coffee legend, has opened its first Baltimore-area coffee bar and retail shop in Host International's new B&W Marketplace, a 2,100-square-foot store that opened recently behind the American Airlines ticket counter on the upper level of the terminal near Pier C.The shop-within-a-shop is the first airport location on the East Coast for Starbucks, whose fanatical approach to coffee freshness reflects the obsession of its native city.
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