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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
A trailer containing 40 aircraft rocket launchers and missing since last week has been found in the parking lot of an East Baltimore shopping center, authorities say.A police officer on routine patrol spotted the 48-foot Fruehauf-brand trailer with Maine license plate F-79325 about 2:30 p.m. yesterday on the Erdman Avenue Shopping Center lot in the 3900 block of Erdman Ave., according to city police and the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 18, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even as Russia pledged to begin withdrawing its forces from neighboring Georgia today, U.S. officials said the Russian military had been moving launchers for short-range ballistic missiles into South Ossetia, a step that appeared intended to tighten its hold on the breakaway territory. The Russian military deployed several SS-21 missile launchers and supply vehicles to South Ossetia on Friday, according to U.S. officials familiar with intelligence reports. From the new launching positions north of Tskhinvali, the South Ossetian capital, the missiles can reach much of Georgia, including Tbilisi, the capital.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Secret U.S. assistance to Iraq may have helped President Saddam Hussein use an undetected fleet of mobile launchers to fire dozens of Scud missiles at Israel and Saudi Arabia during the Persian Gulf war.Many of these launchers may have been manufactured for Iraq by a U.S. company.During the war, Iraq fired more than 80 Scuds, killing 28 Americans and at least one Israeli. After the war, U.S. intelligence officials estimated that Iraq had converted as many as 225 trucks into mobile launchers -- many times more than had been estimated before the war.Just after the first wave of Scud attacks on Israel, an American named Richard C. Fuicz began telling U.S. government investigators about a visit he made in September 1987 to a truck manufacturing plant owned by Terex Corp.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
The "C" Building on Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River campus churned out Mace and Matador guided missiles during the 1940s and 1950s, Pershing Missile Launchers during the 1960s and Patriot Missile Launchers during the 1970s. Yesterday, Lockheed officials unveiled its latest reincarnation: Non-Line Of Sight missile launchers for the Army and Navy. It's new business for the campus and allowed Bethesda-based Lockheed to expand its work force there by 20 percent to 650 - a far cry from the more than 53,000 who built 120 military planes a month at its peak in 1943 during World War II. Today, Lockheed leases a portion of the nearly 70-year-old "C" Building to a warehousing company.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
The Navy went with experience when it selected a Northrop Grumman Corp. unit in Sunnyvale, Calif., over Lockheed Martin Corp.'s division in Middle River to produce a system for firing Tomahawk cruise missiles from submarines. Northrop Grumman Marine Systems was awarded a $16.6 million contract late Tuesday for the design, fabrication and testing of the system, edging out Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit in Baltimore County. Lockheed Martin has been building missile launchers at Middle River for more than 20 years, but its MK-41 launchers are designed to fire a wide variety of missiles from surface ships, not submarines.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
The Navy awarded Martin Marietta Corp.'s plant in Middle River a contract valued at $298 million yesterday for the production of rocket launchers used on ships.The contract for the manufacture of vertical launching systems, or VLS as they are commonly called by workers at the Baltimore County plant, "represents a very big chunk of business," said spokesman Donald Carson. "It's very good news."VLS is a cluster of canisters that fit below deck on ships. They store and launch a variety of missiles against aircraft, submarines or land-based targets.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
The "C" Building on Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River campus churned out Mace and Matador guided missiles during the 1940s and 1950s, Pershing Missile Launchers during the 1960s and Patriot Missile Launchers during the 1970s. Yesterday, Lockheed officials unveiled its latest reincarnation: Non-Line Of Sight missile launchers for the Army and Navy. It's new business for the campus and allowed Bethesda-based Lockheed to expand its work force there by 20 percent to 650 - a far cry from the more than 53,000 who built 120 military planes a month at its peak in 1943 during World War II. Today, Lockheed leases a portion of the nearly 70-year-old "C" Building to a warehousing company.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 22, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- Iraq launched more waves of Scud missiles at Saudi Arabia yesterday and early today, not long after a senior U.S. commander said that U.S.-led military forces were "nowhere near" the goal of eliminating the missile threat.All the Iraqi medium-range ballistic missiles -- at least five in all -- were either intercepted by air-defense missiles or fell in areas where they caused no serious damage or injuries.The first attack, a lone missile launched before dawn at Dhahran, fell harmlessly into the Persian Gulf off the coast of Al Jubayl, U.S. military officials said.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River facility has received a contract for $51 million to manufacture missile launchers for the Navy's last three Arleigh Burke-class destroyers now under construction. The contract, which follows a $27 million award last summer to buy materials, marks the Navy's last order of MK 41 Vertical Launch Systems, which Lockheed has been making for the Navy since 1984. Each ship will get 12 modules that together can store and launch up to 96 missiles. Lockheed is to deliver the launchers by 2010, when the final three ships are expected to be delivered to the Navy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Well before allied ground units swept into Iraq, U.S. commando teams were waging a clandestine war deep inside Iraqi territory, Pentagon officials say.["It was turning into a special-operations theme park," one source told the Associated Press.]In operations that still remain partly cloaked in secrecy, special-operations forces tracked Iraqi armored units from behind enemy lines and hunted for Scud missile launchers.Infiltrated into Iraq at night by aircraft, the Special Forces teams gathered intelligence about the movement of Iraqi forces north and south of the Euphrates River.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River facility has received a contract for $51 million to manufacture missile launchers for the Navy's last three Arleigh Burke-class destroyers now under construction. The contract, which follows a $27 million award last summer to buy materials, marks the Navy's last order of MK 41 Vertical Launch Systems, which Lockheed has been making for the Navy since 1984. Each ship will get 12 modules that together can store and launch up to 96 missiles. Lockheed is to deliver the launchers by 2010, when the final three ships are expected to be delivered to the Navy.
NEWS
By Christine Spolar and Christine Spolar,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Insurgents answered a week of high-tech assaults by U.S. forces in Iraq with a bit of well-orchestrated, low-tech guerrilla warfare yesterday, using donkeys to mount rocket attacks against two hotels and the nation's Oil Ministry. Rockets soared from launchers hidden in donkey carts in two attacks early yesterday - one on the Palestine Hotel and the former Sheraton in the heart of Baghdad, and one on the Oil Ministry. One American, believed to work for Kellogg Brown & Root Inc., was seriously injured in the hotel attack, suffering wounds to his head and torso.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
After years on sketch pads and drawing boards, the U.S. Navy's effort to design a new class of destroyer yielded its first pieces of steel a few weeks ago. Workers in a Mississippi shipyard welded together a giant box simulating a section of the hull to test a novel plan for storing missiles in rows just beneath the ship's outer skin, rather than bunched together in the center. The "test article" was hauled to a range at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, wired with cameras and sensors, loaded with "representative ordnance" and blown up. And at the Lockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Marine Systems unit in Middle River was awarded a $142 million contract yesterday to build missile launchers for the U.S. Navy and foreign navies, ensuring that the plant's main production line will stay open at least into 2007. The value could approach $323 million, with work continuing through 2009, if the federal government exercises two options. The award, which was expected, ensures a future for Lockheed Martin's MK 41 Vertical Launching System, the premier product built at the company's plant on Eastern Boulevard, which has 600 employees.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
The Navy went with experience when it selected a Northrop Grumman Corp. unit in Sunnyvale, Calif., over Lockheed Martin Corp.'s division in Middle River to produce a system for firing Tomahawk cruise missiles from submarines. Northrop Grumman Marine Systems was awarded a $16.6 million contract late Tuesday for the design, fabrication and testing of the system, edging out Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit in Baltimore County. Lockheed Martin has been building missile launchers at Middle River for more than 20 years, but its MK-41 launchers are designed to fire a wide variety of missiles from surface ships, not submarines.
NEWS
October 9, 2001
The state fire marshal's office was investigating yesterday the delivery of grenade launchers to a home in Harford County, a spokesman said. Marlene Remakis of the 2800 block of Belcamp Road in Belcamp called the Harford County sheriff's office about 11:10 a.m. after she received a delivery of three packages, one of which contained four barrel grenade launchers, police said. Deputy State Fire Marshal Carson Widdoes removed the launchers, which he described as having 40 mm, 12-inch barrels that attach to an M-16 or AR-15 rifle.
NEWS
January 30, 1991
Iraq said to want Iranian launchersFirst, Iraqi jets sought refuge in Iran, now Iraq wants to buy about 100 mobile Scud missile launchers from Tehran, an American intelligence official says. U.S. officials don't know whether Iran is willing to sell the launchers, which it bought from North Korea in the 1980s, "but there are suspicions," the source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday.The intelligence source said it was uncertain whether the Iranian-bought launchers would be capable of firing Iraq's modified Scuds -- known as the al-Hussein and al-Abbas missiles.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley and Joel Brinkley,New York Times News Service | October 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A new book says that Israel has a nuclear arsenal far larger than the U.S. government previously suspected and that a principal potential target for those arms has been the Soviet Union."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
The arsenal found in Richmond Laney's Ellicott City home -- which included a rocket launcher with a live 81 mm round and a 60 mm mortar -- could have resulted in deaths and the destruction of numerous buildings, a weapons expert said yesterday. "That list of materials suggests he had some pretty significant plans," said Natalie Goldring, executive director of the Program on General Disarmament at the University of Maryland. "The bottom line here is that his collection of weapons and explosives shouldn't be in private hands," she said.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
Today's nuclear-powered carriers fling jet-powered fighter planes into the sky with the same basic technology the Navy has used for 50 years: steam-powered catapults. Now a unit of Northrop Grumman's Electronic Sensors & Systems Sector in Linthicum has won a contract to study a new launching method for the aircraft carriers of the future. Under a 42-month, $61.8 million project, the sector's Marine Systems arm in Sunnyvale, Calif., will build a prototype of an electromagnetic launcher that the Navy wants for a generation of ships set to debut in 2006.
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