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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 11, 2000
Plato wanted it tightly regulated in his Republic. Socrates thought it should be used sparingly - like salt. Pythagoras swore it off entirely and forbid his followers to indulge. For the ancient Greeks, laughter was serious stuff. Some, like Plato, thought it could incite violence and disrupt the social order. Others, like Aristotle, thought it was what distinguished men from beasts. Such notions may sound laughable to modern ears. But the Greeks' assumption - there is nothing funny about laughter - turns out to be thoroughly up to date.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" opens the 55th season for Prince George's Little Theatre, and the production at Bowie Playhouse qualifies as the troupe's strongest start in recent memory. This is inspired theater by every measure, starting with the choice of the largely autobiographical 1968 work by Simon, which traces his adolescent years, to begin what became known as his Eugene Trilogy. Perhaps because of frequent stagings of "The Odd Couple" and other favorites at regional theaters, Simon is sometimes dismissed as a master of the one-liner but lacking in substance.
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FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Laugh yourself well.Sounds crazy, doesn't it?But medical professionals, buoyed by research suggesting humor may contribute to good health, are now examining the lighter side of being sick. After years of making merry only in pediatrics, nurses and doctors are beginning to believe what's good for the child may be good for the adult.Consequently, humor is turning up in some unlikely places:* In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association published an article titled "The Physiologic Effects of Humor, Mirth and Laughter."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
For no particular reason, except to add a bit of laughter to this sad, sorry world, Midweek Madness has gone back to the treasure trove known as Scopitones and resurrected a bizarre ditty from The Tornados called "The Robot. " And you thought you knew how to throw a fun picnic.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | October 5, 2007
Bowie Community Theatre president Janice Coffey says this season is "all about laughter," and the troupe drew plenty of it last weekend with Larry Shue's The Nerd. Shue died in 1985 at age 39 in a commuter plane crash in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains. His sitcom-style play opened on Broadway two years later, mixing a fun plot filled with colorful characters and physical and verbal comedy. As a bonus, it has a surprise ending. Bob Kauffman, former Anne Arundel Community College theater department chairman, recalled meeting Shue while taking students on a 1985 New York theater tour, which included seeing Shue's off-Broadway hit The Foreigner.
BUSINESS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Special to The Sun | November 26, 1990
The man was almost embarrassed out of his job.Joe DiNucci had just been named new sales manager of Digital Equipment Corporation and was the guest of honor at a dinner with Digital's senior research staff. During the dinner, one staff member said Digital would produce the world's best computer workstations in three years.Unimpressed, Mr. DiNucci said, "If we don't do it in two years, it will be too late."The staff member, who didn't like being upstaged by a newcomer, replied, "You know, you're really full of s - - -."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 9, 2007
The Baltimore Opera Company's opening performance of Verdi's darkly beautiful La forza del destino was nearly ruined for me by a sound not typically associated with this work - laughter. No, I'm not talking about the mild comic relief Verdi intended, a la Shakespeare, in a couple of scenes involving an out-of-sorts friar. The giggles and guffaws came instead in the midst of deadly serious business. No doubt, the primary culprit was the supertitles, those now de rigueur translations of an opera's libretto projected above the stage.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
It's an ancient instinct. Dictators and schoolteachers have tried to control it, fearing its contagious power to undermine authority. When it erupts at the wrong moment, it can signal severe illness.Still, most people can't talk about it without cracking a smile.It's laughter. And for Professor Robert E. Provine, who has spent the past six years studying chortles, titters, brays, giggles and guffaws, it's a very serious subject."We spend a lot of time looking at the vocalization of other animals, such as bird sounds and animal calls," says Dr. Provine, 52, a psychologist at the University of Maryland at Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
NEW YORK -- In the backroom of a chi-chi sushi restaurant situated near ground zero, surrounded by police blockades and groups of tired firefighters walking the streets, a panel of high-profile Gen-X jokesters genuinely discussed the state of funny in a country that's forever changed. "No Laughing Matter: Comedy Writing in Unfunny Times" was dreamed up by journalism job and community Web site mediabistro.com. And as the evening of audacious questions, answers and the occasional anthrax joke unfolded last Tuesday, there was no question that laughter is still the best medicine -- with a few exceptions.
SPORTS
June 5, 2013
THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, everybody!  Welcome to the White House.  (Applause.)  And welcome to the Super Bowl Champion -- world champion -- Baltimore Ravens.  (Applause.)  Everybody can have a seat.  That's why we set up chairs.  (Laughter.)        Now, I suspect that these guys are wondering, what kind of introduction is that?  No smoke machine.  (Laughter.)  No fire cannons.  Obama didn't even tear up chunks of turf and rub them on his suit.  (Laughter.)  That reminds me, by the way -- please don't do that on the South Lawn.  (Laughter.)
SPORTS
June 5, 2013
THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, everybody!  Welcome to the White House.  (Applause.)  And welcome to the Super Bowl Champion -- world champion -- Baltimore Ravens.  (Applause.)  Everybody can have a seat.  That's why we set up chairs.  (Laughter.)        Now, I suspect that these guys are wondering, what kind of introduction is that?  No smoke machine.  (Laughter.)  No fire cannons.  Obama didn't even tear up chunks of turf and rub them on his suit.  (Laughter.)  That reminds me, by the way -- please don't do that on the South Lawn.  (Laughter.)
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Hello, Midshipmen! (Applause.) Well, thank you, Governor O'Malley, for your kind introduction and the great support that Maryland gives this Academy. To Secretary Mabus, Admiral Greenert, General Paxton -- thank you all for your incredible leadership of our extraordinary Navy and Marine Corps teams. To Vice Admiral Miller, thank you for the outstanding work that you do. To Captain Clark and all the faculty and staff; to the moms and dads who raised your sons and daughters to seek this life of service; to the local sponsor families who cared for them far from home; the members of the Class of 1963 -- veterans who've guided these midshipmen along the way -- today is also a tribute to your support and your patriotism.
HEALTH
The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
If it's Tuesday, it must be pickleball — at least for a fun-loving group of women who meet at the Churchville Recreation Center in Harford County. The group started about five years ago, and members play indoors during the school year and outdoors in the summer or whenever they can. We met them on a beautiful June morning to see just why the heck this thing called pickleball gets them so fired up. Pickleball? It's a little like tennis and pingpong and a lot like badminton.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
The program at Goucher College's 121st commencement ceremony Friday listed speaker Ira Glass' main connection to the Towson college: His grandmother was a member of its Class of 1931. In the public radio host's remarks, he added that college President Sanford J. Ungar was his former colleague at NPR and had coaxed him into appearing. But Glass shared another connection that only a college student could best appreciate - that he lost his virginity in one of the campus dorm rooms. "Not recently," he added.
NEWS
By White House Press Office | July 22, 2011
REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND TOWN HALL Ritchie Coliseum University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 11:04 A.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Hello, Maryland! (Applause.) Hello! Nice to see you. Thank you so much. (Applause.) Everybody, please have a seat. I see some smart folks up there wore shorts. (Laughter.) My team said I should not wear shorts. (Laughter.) My legs aren't good enough to wear shorts. AUDIENCE MEMBER: (Inaudible.) (Laughter.) THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. I'll tell Michelle you said so. (Laughter.)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 16, 2011
Dr. Frederick Joseph Hatem, a retired Havre de Grace obstetrician who delivered thousands of babies in Harford and Cecil counties during his four-decade career, including baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. , died June 6 of heart failure at Harford Memorial Hospital. He was 84. Dr. Hatem, whose parents owned and operated a general store, was born in Havre de Grace, where he spent his entire life. He was a 1942 graduate of Havre de Grace High School and served in the Army as an administrative assistant stateside to a colonel, until being discharged in 1946.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
For no particular reason, except to add a bit of laughter to this sad, sorry world, Midweek Madness has gone back to the treasure trove known as Scopitones and resurrected a bizarre ditty from The Tornados called "The Robot. " And you thought you knew how to throw a fun picnic.
NEWS
December 1, 1994
LANI GUINIER is the University of Pennsylvania law professor who was nominated by President Clinton to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, then un-nominated when criticism of her views mounted.Her travail followed that of Zoe Baird, who had previously been nominated to be attorney general but had to withdraw.Ms. Guinier spoke to the National Press Club in Washington recently. She began this way:"Thank you very much. As you can all imagine, this has been a most interesting year and a half for me. I have gone from relative obscurity to being someone that people stop in the street and introduce themselves to."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Human relations seemed so straightforward and basically workable before Edward Albee started looking into them. In 1961, the playwright dug so deeply beneath the skin to expose gnawing marital complexities in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" that audiences felt as naked and wounded as the characters by the end. Four decades later, Albee peeled away still more layers and, if anything, revealed even more uncomfortable relationships in "The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?" It wouldn't be surprising to see people with dazed looks stumbling out of Howard Community College's Studio Theatre after performances of Rep Stage's first-rate production of the Tony Award-winning "The Goat."
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