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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet riot troops attacked the Latvian police headquarters in Riga last night, starting an hourlong gunbattle that left at least four dead and nine injured, according to Latvian television and eyewitnesses.The troops also reportedly broke down the doors of the Hotel Ridzene, where Latvian President Anatolijs V. Gorbunovs was holding a meeting. He was reported unharmed.Eyewitnesses described a wild scene in the center of the city, with tracer bullets lighting the sky, automatic weapons fire and an explosion echoing through the streets and smoke rising from burning vehicles.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2007
Nation: Investigations Time Warner settles with Ohio Ohio has reached a $144 million settlement with Time Warner Inc. over claims that public employees lost millions after the media conglomerate agreed to be acquired by America Online, the state's attorney general said yesterday. The state sued in 2003 on behalf of five state pension funds and the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation that said they lost $400 million when Time Warner's stock fell sharply after the 2001 deal. The settlement is the latest against Time Warner, which has reached other agreements to resolve claims from investors and regulators that AOL fraudulently inflated its online advertising revenue and subscriber counts.
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NEWS
By Will Englund | March 19, 2005
RIGA, the capital of Latvia, is a charming old city on the Baltic. It is one of the few places where surviving veterans of both the Soviet and Nazi armies live side by side, and last week it was, again, the scene of a commemorative march by men who served in the Latvian SS Division. Here are a few figures to think about: Number of years the SS men have marched: 15. Number of years Soviet veterans have protested: the same. Number of times Latvia was invaded by the Soviet Union: 2. By Nazi Germany: 1. Number of Latvians deported to Siberia during the first Soviet occupation (from 1940 to 1941)
SPORTS
By LORI RILEY and LORI RILEY,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 7, 2005
NEW YORK -- Susan Chepkemei threw up, looked over her shoulder and kept running. Hendrick Ramaala threw himself across the finish line, fell down and lay spread-eagled on the timing mat. Both had been winning the New York City Marathon. Both lost. "In my wildest dreams, I don't know that I thought we'd see races like that," first-year race director Mary Wittenberg said. After 26.2 miles, the men's race came down to a sprint. World record-holder Paul Tergat of Kenya outkicked Ramaala, the defending New York champion from South Africa, in the last few steps in the closest finish in the race's 36-year history.
NEWS
By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | January 1, 1995
SEATTLE -- Flushed with success from its earlier recycling ventures, Seattle is moving into a new field: toilets.The Emerald City is sending 200 used potties to Auce, Latvia, where they are to be used in a hospital. The unusual shipment was engineered by Mike Jansevics, a Latvian emigre who now lives in Shelton, Wash.At his urging, the International Rotary Club is planning to renovate a three-story office building in Auce (pronounced ow-seh) for a hospital.The not-really-portable potties were collected by the Seattle Water Department, which has begun paying commercial building owners $135 for each water-guzzling toilet replaced with a water-stingy one.The department figured it would save money by avoiding or deferring the cost of building a new reservoir.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1991
As communism crumbles and the Soviet Union shatters, the people of Latvia are savoring political independence for the first time in five decades.Latvians also are rekindling the religious faith extinguished by Moscow in 1940, when the Soviets annexed the Baltic country.To help in that rebirth of faith, Southern Baptists from Maryland and Delaware are undertaking a three-year mission program that would spiritually and materially assist the estimated 4,700 Latvian Baptists.More than 100 local Baptist ministers and lay people are expected to travel to the Latvian capital of Riga to help renovate churches recently released from Soviet control, install computer equipment at the office of the Union of Latvian Baptists, and conduct seminars on Sunday school instruction and pastoral counseling, among other activities.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 19, 1990
MOSCOW -- On Monday, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the Fourth Congress of People's Deputies that "the country and the people are becoming increasingly convinced that it is vitally important to preserve" the Soviet Union on the basis of his proposed union treaty.Yesterday, evidence to support his thesis was hard to come by:* Latvian officials charged that three explosions in Riga early in the day were staged by communist and military hard-liners as a prelude to a military takeover to block Latvian independence.
NEWS
By MICHAEL S. WHEATLEY | November 29, 1992
Riga, Latvia.--This is a city of placard-wavers and sidewalk debates and monuments in a country of unmarked graves.It is a haven for hustlers and opportunists, well-intentioned experts and missionaries, and hucksters selling everything from irrigation systems and American fried chicken to hot cars.It is a city at whose heart is still garrisoned the remnant of an army that brought it to heel.And it is the seat of a government that at times seems overwhelmed by the legacy of 50 years of Soviet occupation and the intense Russification that came with it.It is a city in a country that remains, in many ways, up for grabs.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | June 24, 1991
*Last January, under the cloak of the blanket of coverage given to the war in the Persian Gulf, the Soviet Union's army launched a brutal attack against the Latvian Parliament in Riga.The parliament, which had passed an independence resolution in defiance of Soviet authority, had been in continuous session for more than a week. The parliament building was surrounded by Latvian citizens who had come to protect their new-found freedom from the Russians who had ruled their land since the end of World War II.These hundreds of citizens were there to witness, certain that their presence would stop any brutality.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 3, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze submitted his resignation last month because he feared that demands for order could end with a military crackdown that would undermine domestic reform and East-West relations, he said in an interview published yesterday."
NEWS
By Will Englund | March 19, 2005
RIGA, the capital of Latvia, is a charming old city on the Baltic. It is one of the few places where surviving veterans of both the Soviet and Nazi armies live side by side, and last week it was, again, the scene of a commemorative march by men who served in the Latvian SS Division. Here are a few figures to think about: Number of years the SS men have marched: 15. Number of years Soviet veterans have protested: the same. Number of times Latvia was invaded by the Soviet Union: 2. By Nazi Germany: 1. Number of Latvians deported to Siberia during the first Soviet occupation (from 1940 to 1941)
NEWS
By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | January 1, 1995
SEATTLE -- Flushed with success from its earlier recycling ventures, Seattle is moving into a new field: toilets.The Emerald City is sending 200 used potties to Auce, Latvia, where they are to be used in a hospital. The unusual shipment was engineered by Mike Jansevics, a Latvian emigre who now lives in Shelton, Wash.At his urging, the International Rotary Club is planning to renovate a three-story office building in Auce (pronounced ow-seh) for a hospital.The not-really-portable potties were collected by the Seattle Water Department, which has begun paying commercial building owners $135 for each water-guzzling toilet replaced with a water-stingy one.The department figured it would save money by avoiding or deferring the cost of building a new reservoir.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "Diplomacy is not that different from public relations," Latvia's ambassador to the United States observes with a smile, "except you get more respect."He should know. Ten years ago, Ojars Kalnins was a budding Chicago adman, pushing auto parts and industrial sump pumps. Tomorrow, he'll be among the dignitaries welcoming President Clinton to Riga, Latvia's capital, as Mr. Clinton becomes the first American president to visit the Baltic states.Ambassador Kalnins' overnight transformation from American PR man to foreign diplomat is a reflection of the enormous changes taking place in the republics of Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia, which broke away from the disintegrating Soviet Union and declared their independence in 1991.
NEWS
By MICHAEL S. WHEATLEY | November 29, 1992
Riga, Latvia.--This is a city of placard-wavers and sidewalk debates and monuments in a country of unmarked graves.It is a haven for hustlers and opportunists, well-intentioned experts and missionaries, and hucksters selling everything from irrigation systems and American fried chicken to hot cars.It is a city at whose heart is still garrisoned the remnant of an army that brought it to heel.And it is the seat of a government that at times seems overwhelmed by the legacy of 50 years of Soviet occupation and the intense Russification that came with it.It is a city in a country that remains, in many ways, up for grabs.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1991
As communism crumbles and the Soviet Union shatters, the people of Latvia are savoring political independence for the first time in five decades.Latvians also are rekindling the religious faith extinguished by Moscow in 1940, when the Soviets annexed the Baltic country.To help in that rebirth of faith, Southern Baptists from Maryland and Delaware are undertaking a three-year mission program that would spiritually and materially assist the estimated 4,700 Latvian Baptists.More than 100 local Baptist ministers and lay people are expected to travel to the Latvian capital of Riga to help renovate churches recently released from Soviet control, install computer equipment at the office of the Union of Latvian Baptists, and conduct seminars on Sunday school instruction and pastoral counseling, among other activities.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | June 24, 1991
*Last January, under the cloak of the blanket of coverage given to the war in the Persian Gulf, the Soviet Union's army launched a brutal attack against the Latvian Parliament in Riga.The parliament, which had passed an independence resolution in defiance of Soviet authority, had been in continuous session for more than a week. The parliament building was surrounded by Latvian citizens who had come to protect their new-found freedom from the Russians who had ruled their land since the end of World War II.These hundreds of citizens were there to witness, certain that their presence would stop any brutality.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
MOSCOW -- Thousands of Soviet paratroopers were dispatched yesterday to seven rebellious republics to enforce last autumn's military draft, which was ignored by most of those called up in the seven republics, often with the support of laws passed by local parliaments.Moscow's challenge to Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Georgia, Armenia and the western Ukraine is likely to meet with bitter resistance if troops launch a house-to-house search for draft dodgers. However, it appeared that troops would not use force until at least next week.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2007
Nation: Investigations Time Warner settles with Ohio Ohio has reached a $144 million settlement with Time Warner Inc. over claims that public employees lost millions after the media conglomerate agreed to be acquired by America Online, the state's attorney general said yesterday. The state sued in 2003 on behalf of five state pension funds and the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation that said they lost $400 million when Time Warner's stock fell sharply after the 2001 deal. The settlement is the latest against Time Warner, which has reached other agreements to resolve claims from investors and regulators that AOL fraudulently inflated its online advertising revenue and subscriber counts.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 4, 1991
MOSCOW -- Voters in Latvia and Estonia defied the Kremlin yesterday and backed independence by a ratio of more than 2-to-1 in referendums designed to give a moral boost to the Baltic republics' drive to restore their statehood.In Latvia, officials reported an 85 percent turnout, with about 70 percent of voters backing "a democratic, independent state," according to preliminary returns reported by Soviet television.In Estonia, the Baltfax news agency reported, about 85 percent of voters went to the polls, and 80 percent of them voted to support "restoration of independent statehood," as the single question on the ballot was phrased.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet riot troops attacked the Latvian police headquarters in Riga last night, starting an hourlong gunbattle that left at least four dead and nine injured, according to Latvian television and eyewitnesses.The troops also reportedly broke down the doors of the Hotel Ridzene, where Latvian President Anatolijs V. Gorbunovs was holding a meeting. He was reported unharmed.Eyewitnesses described a wild scene in the center of the city, with tracer bullets lighting the sky, automatic weapons fire and an explosion echoing through the streets and smoke rising from burning vehicles.
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