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February 4, 2004
On January 31, 2004, GLADYS LORRAINE (nee Robinson), devoted mother of Cynthia and Janice Lattimore, Carol Lattimore Greene and Terrence Lattimore. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, one great-grandchild, her mother Essie M. Robinson, two sister, three brothers, nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and friendsFriends may call at Parker, Chavis and Cromartie Funeral Service, P.A., 3512 Frederick Avenue on Wednesday from 4 until 8...
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SPORTS
By Ben Breiner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Minutes after Saturday's game ended, Navy linebacker Kwesi Mitchell spoke in measured tones as he explained how the defense deserved a larger share of the blame for the outcome. His coach, Ken Niumatalolo, said the team did not come to Williams-Brice Stadium for a moral victory. It left with no victory at all. Gamecocks running back Marcus Lattimore tore through the Navy defense for a career-high 246 yards, and the Midshipmen fell, 24-21, to No. 10 South Carolina before an announced 78,807.
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SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | December 12, 2002
Mount St. Joseph's Keon Lattimore, a two-time All-Metro running back and wide receiver, said last night that he has orally committed to a full football scholarship to attend the University of Maryland. The brother of Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, Lattimore said proximity to his family was a factor in his decision, along with Terps coach Ralph Friedgen's vow to "give me a shot as a running back-wide receiver type." "I'm close to my family. That was really my main focus," said the 6-foot-1, 205-pound Lattimore, who has clocked a 4.39-second 40-yard dash.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Although more than a decade has passed since his self-titled debut went gold, Kenny Lattimore feels as if he's a new artist. And in a way, he is. The R&B-pop singer, perhaps best known for the breezy 1997 wedding-song smash "For You," is attempting to establish himself as a song interpreter. The days of trying to shoehorn his soft approach into hard-edged, trendy styles are behind him. On Timeless, his new CD and first solo release in seven years, he's making tentative steps in a new direction by singing covers.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
Mount St. Joseph's Keon Lattimore is awaiting SAT test results that will determine if he will enroll at the University of Maryland this fall and play for the Terps' nationally ranked football team, according to his brother, Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis. Lewis confirmed yesterday that Lattimore, a running back for the Gaels, is expected to receive test results within the next two weeks. If Lattimore doesn't get the required score, he might enroll at a military or prep school this fall or possibly play for another college in 2004.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 15, 2006
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Apparently, Maryland running back Keon Lattimore has been paying attention during film sessions. He said yesterday that he knew from studying tape of Virginia that once he got "across the line, there would be a gap in the defense." Turned out it was a 56-yard gap. Not only did Lattimore cross that line yesterday, he also went a career-long 56 yards for a touchdown that put Maryland ahead 21-20 with 9:11 left in the game. Lattimore finished with a career-high 114 yards and one touchdown and averaged 7.6 yards per carry.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - In his office two years ago, Ralph Friedgen looked Ray Lewis in the eye and asked him to be brutally honest. Give it to me straight, Friedgen said. Is Keon Lattimore, your little brother, going to the University of Miami? Because if he is, I'd prefer not to waste my time recruiting him. Yeah coach, Lewis said, he's going to Miami. Friedgen laughs when he thinks about it now, especially when he looks across the practice field and sees Lattimore zipping past a defender - in a Terps uniform.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
In addition to dealing with being the little brother in the shadow of Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, and playing football about 30 miles away from the pro stadium where Lewis plays, Maryland sophomore running back Keon Lattimore has had to deal with being third string. Until yesterday. Determined to find a playmaker who could spark the Terps' running game, which in its last two losses totaled 106 yards combined, coach Ralph Friedgen gave Lattimore an opportunity in yesterday's 22-12 win over Wake Forest.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 1999
Unbeaten Baltimore junior middleweight Emil Baku passed his biggest measuring stick as a professional last night by stopping veteran Darryl Lattimore, of Washington, D.C., at 2: 30 of the fourth round of their scheduled eight-round main event at Martin's West in Woodlawn.The majority in the sellout crowd of 1,500 thought referee Bill Holmes stopped the fight too quickly after Baku (15-0, 12 KOs) caught the left-handed Lattimore on the ropes and landed four hard, unanswered punches.But neither Lattimore (24-20)
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
MIAMI -- While Maryland awaited its 7 p.m. kickoff against Florida International yesterday, the Terps lounged in the Biscayne Bay Marriott, watching their next opponent - No. 3 West Virginia - on television. Despite an unproductive day on offense in their own game, the Terps never trailed and left the Orange Bowl with a 26-10 win, but Maryland running back Keon Lattimore didn't hesitate when asked how much better the Terps will have to play Thursday night against the Mountaineers. "Without a doubt," Lattimore said, "a whole lot better."
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | September 2, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- When Maryland starting quarterback Jordan Steffy jogged off the field at Byrd Stadium last night to visit the trainers' room, former third-string quarterback Chris Turner took over Maryland's offense. He is now next in line. Before the season-opening kickoff against Villanova, the athletic department announced that Josh Portis, the Terps' highly hyped backup quarterback, will not play this season because of an "academic issue." Steffy added to the drama in the third quarter when a cramp in his right leg left him lying on the ground, surrounded by four trainers.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | September 2, 2007
What went right -- Keon Lattimore rushed for a game-high 106 yards and three touchdowns on 21 carries, and in the process he surpassed the 1,000-yard career mark. What went wrong -- Maryland had five penalties for 65 yards. Defining moment -- With Jordan Steffy hobbled by cramps and Josh Portis declared ineligible, former third-string quarterback Chris Turner took over and helped put Lattimore in a position to score an 18-yard touchdown that put the Terps ahead 24-7. What it means -- With Portis out of the picture, there's no question it's Steffy's show now. Last night he took the first step in proving he's capable of handling it. Up next -- The Terps (1-0)
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | April 4, 2007
Maryland running back Keon Lattimore is out with a back injury and reserve tailback Da'Rel Scott was carted off the field at practice yesterday with a left knee injury, causing coach Ralph Friedgen concern about depth at the position. "Running back, that's going to be a real problem," Friedgen said. "I don't know if I'm going to have to move somebody, which I really don't want to do, but I don't know if I'm going to have a choice not to do it." Lattimore, who was part of a one-two punch at tailback last season with Lance Ball, was injured by a hit Saturday.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Special to The Sun | December 20, 2006
The five boys at Marley Elementary School in Glen Burnie are most fond of Mondays and Fridays. Not just because those are pizza and chicken nuggets days in the school cafeteria, though they'll acknowledge that's an added bonus. No, the two days are special because that's when the fifth-graders get to eat lunch, talk and play for 45 minutes with Moses Lattimore, a recently retired U.S. Postal Service employee who serves as a mentor at the school. Over the past two years, Lattimore, a 64-year-old deacon at Community Baptist Church in Pumphrey who has no grandchildren of his own, has mentored 11 fourth- and fifth-grade boys at Marley Elementary.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 15, 2006
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Apparently, Maryland running back Keon Lattimore has been paying attention during film sessions. He said yesterday that he knew from studying tape of Virginia that once he got "across the line, there would be a gap in the defense." Turned out it was a 56-yard gap. Not only did Lattimore cross that line yesterday, he also went a career-long 56 yards for a touchdown that put Maryland ahead 21-20 with 9:11 left in the game. Lattimore finished with a career-high 114 yards and one touchdown and averaged 7.6 yards per carry.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
In addition to dealing with being the little brother in the shadow of Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, and playing football about 30 miles away from the pro stadium where Lewis plays, Maryland sophomore running back Keon Lattimore has had to deal with being third string. Until yesterday. Determined to find a playmaker who could spark the Terps' running game, which in its last two losses totaled 106 yards combined, coach Ralph Friedgen gave Lattimore an opportunity in yesterday's 22-12 win over Wake Forest.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - There has been so much focus this spring on Maryland's quest to pick a starting quarterback that it has been easy to overlook another position battle that might be just as important, if not more so, for the Terps. Coach Ralph Friedgen still needs to pick a starting running back, too. It won't be an easy decision, and it didn't get any easier yesterday during Maryland's annual spring game, the last time the team will practice until fall camp opens Aug. 9. But Friedgen has already made this much clear: The Terps will run the ball this year, and run it often.
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