Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLatrobe
IN THE NEWS

Latrobe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 2003
On September 22, 2003 KATHARINE EARECKSON beloved wife of the late Ferdinand Claiborne Latrobe III; devoted mother of Ferdinand C. Latrobe IV, John H. B. Latrobe and his wife Connie M. Latrobe, Katharine E. Latrobe, Charles C. Latrobe and his wife Linda P. Latrobe; dear sister of Frederick Leif Eareckson and his wife Jean Lee Eareckson; sister-in-law of John Latrobe of Ft. Lauderdale, FL and Mrs. Clayton F. Ruebensaal of Greens Farms, CT. Also survived by...
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Brian Paxton and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
The Baltimore Bohemian isn't your usual sports club. The team splits a case of beer at practice, it wins national championships and it plays sports you've probably never heard of. The Baltimore Gaelic Athletic Association, or BGAA, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. The Bohemian, as the organization is commonly called, is separated into four teams that play traditional Irish sports such as men's and women's Gaelic football, camogie and hurling. But while that sounds like a league for displaced Irishmen - and it is to an extent - the Baltimore team is predominantly made up of people trying the games for the first time.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Katharine Eareckson Latrobe, a homemaker and resident of Lutherville for nearly half a century, died Monday of congestive heart failure at the Wesley Home in Baltimore. She was 83. Katharine Dudley Eareckson was born and raised in Baltimore and was a 1938 graduate of Western High School. Her Eareckson ancestors emigrated from Sweden in 1645. In 1938, she married Ferdinand Claiborne Latrobe III, who headed a construction company and was a descendant of seven-term Baltimore Mayor Ferdinand C. Latrobe.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Charles H. Latrobe III, a retired Koppers Co. executive who was a highly decorated World War II Navy night fighter pilot, died Feb. 16 of complications from pneumonia at Roland Park Place. He was 90. "He was a very private person who had the highest level of integrity possible and was intolerant of those who did not," said Joseph M. Coale III, a political adviser, Baltimore County preservationist and former head of Historic Annapolis. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Charles Hazlehurst Latrobe III was 3 when he moved to a home on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park with his family in 1926.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 13, 2009
Barbara C. Latrobe, who had worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital for two decades and was a longtime volunteer, died Wednesday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 82. Barbara Caffee, the daughter of a businessman and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Edgevale Road in Roland Park. She was a 1944 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree from Goucher College in 1949. Mrs. Latrobe was employed briefly at the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, before going to work in the late 1950s at the Johns Hopkins Moore Clinic.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 31, 1994
Votta's Band. The Stadium Bowling Lanes. Rock-and-Rye whiskey.These are all part of the memories that a lot of Baltimoreans possess and cherish. Here are some that deserve recognition.* John Pente, of High Street in Little Italy, fills in some missing musical notes of an outing on the F.C. Latrobe, the municipal ice-breaking boat that took children on the Thursday trips sponsored by the Free Summer Excursion Society:"As a youngster I would carry my father's trumpet case and board the Latrobe at a small pier about where the World Trade Building stands today.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2001
For more than a century, a mystical, diffused light known as the lumiere mysterieuse emanated from 24 skylights, filling the sanctuary of the Basilica of the Assumption. But the skylights in the basilica's Great Dome were sealed during a renovation in the 1940s, leaving it a darker, more subdued place of worship. Now, as part of a multimillion-dollar restoration of the nation's first Roman Catholic cathedral, workers are peeling back the copper sheeting of the Great Dome of the basilica on Cathedral Street and are installing the first four reproductions of the original skylights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | December 17, 2000
For travelers heading to Baltimore in the early 1800s, Benjamin Henry Latrobe's Roman Catholic Cathedral was a powerful symbol of religious freedom in America. Built from 1806 to 1821 on the highest point in town, it immediately became one of the most prominent buildings on the skyline. Its light-filled interior, capped by a large dome, was an engineering wonder. Its size and shape told all the world that Baltimore, the first city in the country to build a Catholic cathedral, was a place where people were free to worship as they pleased.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
The Latrobe Building at Charles and Read streets is one of many historic office structures in Baltimore that has lost most of its tenants in recent years, even though it has been renovated extensively inside and out.The latest blow came this spring, when Cochran Stephenson & Donkervoet, the architectural firm that oversaw $3.5 million worth of renovations there in the 1980s, moved its headquarters to the former B&O Warehouse at Camden Yards. The architects' move left the nine-story building, named after seven-term Baltimore Mayor Ferdinand Latrobe, practically empty.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
He's a musical director and orchestra conductor who has lived in New York and on the West Coast.She's a singer and actress who hails from South Dakota.As theater professionals, they often travel. So when they got married 2 1/2 years ago, Kevin and Karin Farrell decided to buy a house where they could come home for the holidays and put down roots.That's how they came to own one of Baltimore's most historic residences, the Latrobe House on Cathedral Hill."Our business is the theater," Kevin Farrell explained.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Two men were sentenced to 10 years in prison this week as federal prosecutors seek to close the books on a large illegal drug ring they say operated out of Latrobe Homes in East Baltimore. Judges sentenced Raymond Williams, 36, on Thursday, and Melvin Thompson, 31, on Tuesday. The two were charged in a case officials called Operation Usual Suspects that nabbed a total of 66 defendants in March 2011, including "The Wire" actress Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. Numerous other defendants have been sentenced to up to 12 years in prison.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Death came for Arunah Shepherdson Abell on April 19, 1888, just 27 days before he would have celebrated the 51st anniversary of the newspaper he founded in Baltimore in 1837. Abell, who was in his city townhouse at Charles and Madison streets near Mount Vernon Place, had retired about 9:30 the night before, "fully himself in all save physical activity," reported The Sun in a news article the next morning announcing his death. "DEATH OF MR. A.S. ABELL. THE END OF A USEFUL LIFE.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 13, 2009
Barbara C. Latrobe, who had worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital for two decades and was a longtime volunteer, died Wednesday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 82. Barbara Caffee, the daughter of a businessman and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Edgevale Road in Roland Park. She was a 1944 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree from Goucher College in 1949. Mrs. Latrobe was employed briefly at the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, before going to work in the late 1950s at the Johns Hopkins Moore Clinic.
NEWS
June 24, 2008
A 28-year-old Baltimore man pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to three counts of using a gun to commit a murder in aid of racketeering and one count of distributing cocaine and heroin, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. As a result of the plea agreement, prosecutors said that the attorney general's office has decided not seek the death penalty for Harry Burton, known as "Big Harry." He was indicted in the case in April 2007. The trial for a co-defendant, Allen Gill of Baltimore, began with jury selection yesterday, a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney's office said.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 29, 2008
The smell of filth filled the small apartment. The couches were overturned, along with a washing machine, and the floors were streaked with grime. A bra lay on the floor in front of Shirley Gilbert's refrigerator. The underwear wasn't hers. Neither, she says, was the mess that drug dealers and junkies left for her to clean up in her one-bedroom apartment in the Latrobe public housing community in East Baltimore. "It's not safe here," Gilbert said. "They come in and do what they want to do. They bust the window.
NEWS
October 14, 2007
THE COUNT Homicides since Jan. 1: 238 THE VICTIM Police said investigators still do not know the name of the man whose body was found about 12:15 a.m. yesterday in the 1700 block of Latrobe St. LAST YEAR: Baltimore had recorded 217 homicides as of Oct. 13, 2006. ONLINE: Details and locations of this year's city homicides are at baltimoresun.com/homicidemap
NEWS
February 15, 2000
Marble columns designed by one of early America's premier architects will be installed outside an Annapolis court building after being rescued from a state-owned field near the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup. Eight columns designed by Benjamin Latrobe will be put in place Saturday outside the Robert F. Sweeney District Court Building. Latrobe designed the columns for the Baltimore Exchange and Custom House, which was built between 1816 and 1820. The columns were transferred to the Court of Appeals building in Annapolis when the exchange building was torn down in 1901-1902.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
A group of public housing residents picketed city housing authority offices yesterday, demanding that the agency rescind the transfer of a popular administrator.The 13 residents, from Latrobe Homes in East Baltimore, want former manager Robin Mack reinstated at the 701-unit low-rise complex at 900 E. Madison St. Ms. Mack was transferred March 1 to the Broadway senior citizen high-rise in a management swap that sent Broadway manager Henry Johnson to Latrobe.Carrying picket signs and chanting, "What do we want?
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Older Catholics from the area might remember the winged figures that once flanked the marble altar at the Baltimore Basilica. The pair stood sentinel through the celebration of the Eucharist for more than a century of Sundays before they were removed in the 1940s. Now, after decades in storage, the angels are returning to America's oldest cathedral. At a pair of workshops in Hampden, local craftsmen are peeling off 17 layers of paint from the figures, repairing cracks in the original basswood and resculpting missing parts to restore them to their 19th-century appearance.
NEWS
March 16, 2006
From the beginning, light illuminates the biblical narrative. As an image and a symbol, it signals the presence of God, throughout the world and within man. And so it would be that yesterday, the interior of the nearly restored Basilica of the Assumption was aglow with sunlight, the old cathedral's new linen-white palette reflecting the simplicity of Benjamin Henry Latrobe's neoclassic design. The intent of the $32 million renovation was to restore the nation's first Roman Catholic cathedral to its 19th-century origins, and it mostly reflects that vision.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.