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Latrell Sprewell

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NEWS
By Richard Reeves | December 5, 1997
NEW YORK -- If you think that race relations in the United States have steadily, almost miraculously, improved over the past 35 years -- which I do -- this might be a good week to stay away from newspapers and television news.Names make news, and we are about to be bombarded by some of the biggest of them, beginning with President Clinton and Steven Spielberg, moving on to ''Doonesbury,'' and dropping down to Tawana Brawley and Latrell Sprewell.Race extravaganzaThe president's well-meaning race extravaganza began Wednesday with a town hall meeting in Akron, Ohio, and continued yesterday with the first public hearings of his Advisory Board on Race, chaired by the Duke University historian John Hope Franklin.
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SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | November 13, 2005
On the day Terrell Owens officially talked his way off the Philadelphia Eagles last week, it was written (in our sister paper, Newsday, among other places) and said (by ESPN's Sean Salisbury, for what that's worth) that Owens was the most selfish player in the history of sports. Oh, please. As a fully vested member of the MTV, short-attention-span generation, this even embarrasses me. Let's all sit down, take a deep breath, sip some chai and try to cast our memories beyond Monday afternoon.
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SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It was Chris Webber's first trip back here since being traded, and when he walked onto the court in his Washington Bullets uniform, he did so with a strut. However, when he left, he had to do so with assistance.A game between the two teams involved in the blockbuster trade of the season was marred last night when Webber suffered a dislocated left shoulder in the Bullets' 107-87 loss before a sellout crowd at the Oakland Coliseum. He is expected to miss several games.Webber was injured with 9:25 left in the third quarter when he came down on his left shoulder while battling for a loose ball with Golden State guard Latrell Sprewell.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 12, 2004
IF PRO BASKETBALL could only be as made of Teflon as pro football is. If only the world was as forgiving of the NBA as it is of major league baseball. However, you know what they say about "ifs" and "buts." Suffice it to say the NBA won't be having a merry Christmas - not even with the must-see doubleheader of the millennium airing on that festive day. In fact, the reason fans all over America will be digging through the wrapping paper for the remote two Saturdays from now is the same reason the NBA is in for a season's worth of hurt.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | November 13, 2005
On the day Terrell Owens officially talked his way off the Philadelphia Eagles last week, it was written (in our sister paper, Newsday, among other places) and said (by ESPN's Sean Salisbury, for what that's worth) that Owens was the most selfish player in the history of sports. Oh, please. As a fully vested member of the MTV, short-attention-span generation, this even embarrasses me. Let's all sit down, take a deep breath, sip some chai and try to cast our memories beyond Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By John D. Meyers | March 25, 1998
IN 1995, I warned anyone who would listen that the soon-to-be-built MCI Center in Washington would forever change the way local fans related to professional basketball games. On my first visit there last month, I realize my prophecy is depressingly true.Upon arriving at the center, my wife and I are unsure of what to expect, yet we hope for a positive experience. After all, we are seasoned sports fans; we've made the transition from Memorial Stadium to Camden Yards for Orioles games, and in doing so learned that tradition need not be sacrificed at the altar of entertainment.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 12, 2004
IF PRO BASKETBALL could only be as made of Teflon as pro football is. If only the world was as forgiving of the NBA as it is of major league baseball. However, you know what they say about "ifs" and "buts." Suffice it to say the NBA won't be having a merry Christmas - not even with the must-see doubleheader of the millennium airing on that festive day. In fact, the reason fans all over America will be digging through the wrapping paper for the remote two Saturdays from now is the same reason the NBA is in for a season's worth of hurt.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 2001
NEW YORK - Latrell Sprewell cooled down yesterday afternoon after the New York Knicks ended a brief shootaround before their game against the Dallas Mavericks. This was the Knicks' final contest before the NBA's All-Star break. Sprewell, happily - some might say miraculously - was an All-Star again. In December 1997, Sprewell, then with the Golden State Warriors, became the symbol of everything that was wrong with rich, professional athletes when he choked his coach, P. J. Carlesimo. Today, Carlesimo is out of coaching, and Sprewell will be playing in one of the NBA's showcase events.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
On the pages of the tabloids, he was referred to as "Hoop Thug," "Sports Goon" and "Choker." But upon his arrival in New York, Latrell Sprewell was immediately embraced by fans, who saw him not as the symbol of what was wrong with professional sports -- but as a talented player who could make the Knicks a championship contender."
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
OAKLAND, Calif. -- As P. J. Carlesimo approached the microphone at the end of the Golden State Warriors' holiday party for the homeless, it seemed that the club finally -- after two weeks of intense media scrutiny -- was going to get through a public event without hearing about Latrell Sprewell.But seconds after Carlesimo thanked the more than 500 people in attendance, a chant was starting in the back of the room: "Sprewell, Sprewell." Carlesimo later said he didn't hear it. However, it was a sign that the Warriors' scars are far from healed.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 2001
NEW YORK - Latrell Sprewell cooled down yesterday afternoon after the New York Knicks ended a brief shootaround before their game against the Dallas Mavericks. This was the Knicks' final contest before the NBA's All-Star break. Sprewell, happily - some might say miraculously - was an All-Star again. In December 1997, Sprewell, then with the Golden State Warriors, became the symbol of everything that was wrong with rich, professional athletes when he choked his coach, P. J. Carlesimo. Today, Carlesimo is out of coaching, and Sprewell will be playing in one of the NBA's showcase events.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
On the pages of the tabloids, he was referred to as "Hoop Thug," "Sports Goon" and "Choker." But upon his arrival in New York, Latrell Sprewell was immediately embraced by fans, who saw him not as the symbol of what was wrong with professional sports -- but as a talented player who could make the Knicks a championship contender."
NEWS
By John D. Meyers | March 25, 1998
IN 1995, I warned anyone who would listen that the soon-to-be-built MCI Center in Washington would forever change the way local fans related to professional basketball games. On my first visit there last month, I realize my prophecy is depressingly true.Upon arriving at the center, my wife and I are unsure of what to expect, yet we hope for a positive experience. After all, we are seasoned sports fans; we've made the transition from Memorial Stadium to Camden Yards for Orioles games, and in doing so learned that tradition need not be sacrificed at the altar of entertainment.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
OAKLAND, Calif. -- As P. J. Carlesimo approached the microphone at the end of the Golden State Warriors' holiday party for the homeless, it seemed that the club finally -- after two weeks of intense media scrutiny -- was going to get through a public event without hearing about Latrell Sprewell.But seconds after Carlesimo thanked the more than 500 people in attendance, a chant was starting in the back of the room: "Sprewell, Sprewell." Carlesimo later said he didn't hear it. However, it was a sign that the Warriors' scars are far from healed.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | December 5, 1997
NEW YORK -- If you think that race relations in the United States have steadily, almost miraculously, improved over the past 35 years -- which I do -- this might be a good week to stay away from newspapers and television news.Names make news, and we are about to be bombarded by some of the biggest of them, beginning with President Clinton and Steven Spielberg, moving on to ''Doonesbury,'' and dropping down to Tawana Brawley and Latrell Sprewell.Race extravaganzaThe president's well-meaning race extravaganza began Wednesday with a town hall meeting in Akron, Ohio, and continued yesterday with the first public hearings of his Advisory Board on Race, chaired by the Duke University historian John Hope Franklin.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It was Chris Webber's first trip back here since being traded, and when he walked onto the court in his Washington Bullets uniform, he did so with a strut. However, when he left, he had to do so with assistance.A game between the two teams involved in the blockbuster trade of the season was marred last night when Webber suffered a dislocated left shoulder in the Bullets' 107-87 loss before a sellout crowd at the Oakland Coliseum. He is expected to miss several games.Webber was injured with 9:25 left in the third quarter when he came down on his left shoulder while battling for a loose ball with Golden State guard Latrell Sprewell.
SPORTS
April 8, 1996
Pacers: Reggie Miller scored a season-high 40 points Saturday night, as Indiana beat Miami, 99-95, to clinch its seventh consecutive trip to the playoffs.Warriors: Latrell Sprewell had nine turnovers in Golden State's 111-106 victory over Minnesota on Saturday night.Pub Date: 4/08/96
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 8, 1997
t Golden State Warrior Latrell Sprewell won the fight but lost $25 mill. That's the boxing game for you.In the name of adding stops, the MTA made light rail service worse. That's the real news.City shelters are swamped and turning away folks even before the cold weather hits. Your welfare reform at work.Cheer up. Cuauhtemoc Cardenas has been installed as mayor of Mexico City.Pub Date: 12/08/97
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