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NEWS
May 4, 2010
Obama and the Democrats have demonized Arizona and played the race card for enacting a law that mirrors the U.S. law to protect their citizens against illegals. President Obama said on TV to a large audience that if you're in Arizona, look Latino, and bring your family to an ice cream parlor, you could risk being arrested. This is false, and this scenario could not be used against anyone. The Democratic aim is to frighten citizens and increase the Democratic base with Latinos.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore's Latino Economic Development Center will open a satellite office along Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The office, to be located in space donated by the Southeast Community Development Corporation, is being set up to provide support "to existing and potential immigrant business owners," according to a release from the mayor's office. The office will help those business owners and potential owners with loans, technical assistance and training, the release said.
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NEWS
August 26, 2010
In news coverage of recent assaults on Latinos the complaint has been made that many are afraid to report crime or cooperate with police because they are here illegally. News flash! Anyone of any age, race, religion or ethnicity is reluctant to report crime or talk to police if they are breaking the law themselves! Consider too that many illegals are also guilty of identity fraud (using someone else's name, Social Security number, or fabricating an identity and using forged documents)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It was just a moment of poor teenage judgment: One student threw a marker across a classroom at Digital Harbor High, sparking an argument between a Latino student and a black student. Since they couldn't fight in class, they agreed to meet after school on Federal Hill. The fight was a nasty one, and the Latino boy was sent to the hospital with a concussion. Then word spread, and though school leaders believe the incident wasn't about race, it was impressions that mattered last week.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
One in a series of profiles of Maryland delegates to the Democratic National Convention. Jennifer Hosey was 7 years old the first time she volunteered for a presidential campaign — stuffing and stamping envelopes for Bill Clinton's 1992 run. She has volunteered in every election since. The Potomac resident, now 27, grew up around politics. Her mom was a longtime Democratic Party volunteer. As a student, Hosey was always looking for ways to do more for the party. This year, she is attending her first national convention and, as a delegate, formally casting a vote for President Barack Obama's nomination.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Concern over crime against Latinos, already simmering in Baltimore as a result of several attacks in recent weeks, has reached new heights after the fatal beating over the weekend of a 51-year-old man from Honduras. Martin Reyes — whose killing early Saturday was attributed by police to a mentally troubled man who said he hated "Mexicans" — was the fifth Latino shooting or homicide victim in the area in less than two months, officials said. All the victims were Honduran, according to residents, and one was Reyes' nephew, Juan de Dios Hernandez, 27, who was shot in the forehead July 24. "We're afraid that they're trying to finish off the Hispanics," said Anibal Rodriguez, 30, a Honduran laborer who moved to Baltimore five years ago and who was sitting Monday morning on steps of a house across Kenwood Avenue from where Reyes died.
HEALTH
September 6, 2012
A local donor advocacy group is hoping a handsome soccer star will convince Latinos to donate their organs. Donate Life Maryland is bringing DC United soccer player Andy Najar to Baltimore this weekend to speak about the need for Latinos to donate organs, tissue and corneas. More than 20,000 Latinos living in the U.S. are waiting for a life-saving organ transplant, according to Donate Life Maryland.  About 18 Americans of all ethnicities die each day due to lack of organ donors.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
In a speech bookended by standing ovations, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake told members of Baltimore's Latino community Thursday night that they are critical to meeting her goal of reversing the city's population decline and assured them that city government would not discriminate against them. "In Baltimore, we value and will protect all of our people," she told more than 100 people gathered in a community room at the Southeast Anchor branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library . "Our ambition is to grow Baltimore by 10,000 families in the next 10 years.
NEWS
By Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte | August 14, 1998
NEW FIGURES arrived last week on the playing fields of census, once again casting Latinos as featured contenders.By the year 2005, much sooner than originally projected, Latinos (two-thirds of whom are Mexican American) will become the largest minority group -- 36 million strong -- in the United States. It's a sobering thought.Along with the increased numbers come huge, grinding problems: 1.7 million of the children live in poverty -- that's almost half of all the nation's poor children. And even though it is increasingly more difficult for the unskilled to find work, almost 50 percent of Latinos never complete high school.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2006
When Jessenia Sosa founded the Latin Pride club at Patterson High School last fall, she imagined hosting a few dances and social events. Little did the 18-year-old senior know that by April, club members would be planning not just a dance contest but their second trip to a major immigration rally in Washington. Two busloads of students from Patterson will join tens of thousands of people at the Washington Monument tomorrow afternoon to protest legislation in Congress that would make it a felony to be in the country illegally or to give nonemergency aid to such people.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
The adults who trek to Goucher College every Saturday are worlds away from the social media-savvy students who teach them things as simple as how to turn on a computer or use a mouse. Some who visit the Futuro Latino Learning Center, which draws around 70 participants each week, are improving their English skills with help from dozens of Goucher students. Others have been there long enough that they have become de facto community leaders, sharing the news on immigration reform, language workshops and job fairs.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
When I wrote recently about the multi-lingual Coca-Cola commercial , expressing satisfaction that the influence of white racists appears to be on the wane,* reactions were predictable. A representative specimen from the comment by Blackberry82: " John, you may revel in your smug liberalism now, but your grandchildren and great-grandchildren won't share your amusement when they become the victims of race hatred when they are part of the minority white population in the future USA. They won't understand how you could take such joy in seeing the decline of your own kind and encouraging the onset of their future plight.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
When Annapolis High School senior Aidee Serrano was struggling to learn both English and Spanish while in elementary and middle school, her mother Elsa always lent a hand with homework — even though she spoke little English herself. Now, Aidee is a National Honor Society student at Annapolis High and helping her mother — and others — learn English in a free adult education program called Community Plaza, which serves as an outreach drop-in center used primarily by Annapolis' Latino community.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 30, 2013
I put a question to one of Southeast Baltimore's busiest restaurateurs: What is the secret behind the steady growth of so many Latino restaurants flourishing along the old commercial corridor in Highlandtown? "People are looking for portions, price and quality," said Carlos Cruz, the owner of Carlos O'Charlies, a place that now qualifies as an Eastern Avenue Latin-American institution. Diners are likely also looking for a comfortable place, in a traditional neighborhood that looks ... well, very Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
As the Hispanic community in Baltimore boomed in the last decade, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center responded by adding health programs to meet the population's unique needs. Now the East Baltimore center is bringing all its past efforts - and some new ones - together under one umbrella with the creation of the Center of Excellence for Latino Health. The center, which is in the strategic planning stage, seeks to provide more comprehensive care to Latino patients. Medical staff will provide traditional services such as pediatric, psychiatric and obstetrics and gynecological care.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
When Angelica Barrera moved to Baltimore in 1958 at age 11, she was the only Spanish-speaking student at the William Fell School in Fells Point, where she joined her many German and Polish classmates each morning for a one-hour English language class. "There was no Spanish anything," she said of Baltimore back then. "It's changed. " As Barrera spoke Saturday in the shade of a large tree in Patterson Park, her 85-year-old mother, Angelica Vidal, danced nearby to Latino rhythms familiar from their native Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
Members of the Latino community increasingly are becoming targets of consumer fraud from sales of overpriced computers and credit-card schemes to predatory lending for cars and homes, community leaders say. Regional officials representing counties, cities, AARP and the Federal Trade Commission met yesterday in Chevy Chase to discuss ways they can help Latinos avoid such schemes and to identify new avenues that fraudulent businesses are using. As the purchasing power of Latinos grows in the United States, criminals have become more sophisticated in their efforts to target immigrants.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
The announcements go in rapid-fire succession. Someone is looking for Spanish-speaking volunteers to work in a local woman's shelter. Another person shares the dates and times for HIV tests targeting Latino day laborers. English classes, summer camps, health screenings. Everyone quickly scribbles down the details. Once a month, a cavernous old room at Assisi House of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Fells Point is transformed into a nerve center of sorts for the area's burgeoning Latino immigrant community.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
If the current immigration bill proposed by both major parties passes and is signed into law in its present and projected forms, the predictable result will be a split as yet unseen in our history between all blacks and all Latinos of both genders, driving them out of both parties ("Immigration bill clears hurdle," June 12)! Feeling utterly betrayed by the Democrats - with whom they've been since 1936 to now - black voters may well choose to return to their former party of 1865-to-1936, the GOP. The Latinos will find themselves driven into a virtual war with all blacks.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
The Republican National Committee's approach to repairing the Republican Party will never succeed ("Diversify or die, Republican National Committee is told," April 13). Their attempt to be genuine with women and Latino voters cannot be achieved because anti-abortion and anti-immigration views are core values of their party. As far as addressing misconceptions, I know exactly what they stand for, so I don't see any misconceptions. They need to split the party if they want to get the American voters to show any interest.
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