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By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1995
Forget ovens. If you've got a fireplace, you can cook everything from roasted chicken and casseroles to cakes in the manner of Colonial America.Mary Sue Pagan Latini of Ferndale can show you how. "At the Hearth: Early American Recipes" is her 159-page book of recipes. For the timid, there are tips on transferring the meals to a conventional oven.It took Mrs. Latini about three years to complete the book, which has been published by American Literary Press Inc. in Baltimore. The $14.95 volume should be in local bookstores and museum gift shops within four to six weeks.
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By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
Lord, help my poor soul!" are rumored to be Edgar Allan Poe's last words. It's not clear if he was commenting on the quality of his last meal. The mysterious, macabre Boston-born writer, who died in Baltimore 154 years ago this month, left much of his life to speculation, including the contents of his final meal. With Halloween just around the corner, Baltimore's Flag House & Star-Spangled Banner Museum is taking another stab at that question, sponsoring "Poe's Last Meal," an annual interactive sampling of what the author might have consumed mere nights before his death.
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FEATURES
By Tarsha Burton | July 23, 1995
Sue Latini makes history, and it tastes greatGrowing up in Arkansas, she helped her mother peel potatoes and prepare meals. Now, Sue Latini is food historian for the Baltimore City Life Museums' 1840 House.She's not quite sure how she got the label of food historian. "Somewhere along the way I acquired the title," Mrs. Latini says. "It probably came about during one of my workshops" at the 1840 House.Mrs. Latini, 70, has given monthly workshops and demonstrations in open-hearth cooking at the 1840 House since 1984.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2002
A tanker truck carrying home-heating oil overturned yesterday morning, shutting down a stretch of Route 543 near St. Anne Drive in Harford County until well after the evening rush hour. A tanker driven by Frank Latini Jr. of the 3000 block of Deepwater Way in Edgewood was heading north on Route 543 near Street at 5:48 a.m. when it failed to slow at a curve, skidded into the right guardrail and overturned, said 1st Sgt. Scott Saunders of the Maryland State Police. Latini was treated at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center and released, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2002
A tanker truck carrying home-heating oil overturned yesterday morning, shutting down a stretch of Route 543 near St. Anne Drive in Harford County until well after the evening rush hour. A tanker driven by Frank Latini Jr. of the 3000 block of Deepwater Way in Edgewood was heading north on Route 543 near Street at 5:48 a.m. when it failed to slow at a curve, skidded into the right guardrail and overturned, said 1st Sgt. Scott Saunders of the Maryland State Police. Latini was treated at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center and released, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 2001
FERNDALE RESIDENT Sue Latini has brought her hearthside cooking workshops to the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House in Baltimore. Dressed in period clothing, with a fire properly prepared and blazing behind her, she teaches small groups what it was like to cook in early America. Besides learning what iron pot to use for the chicken with dumplings or how to pile coals on the Dutch oven lid for the fruit cobbler, participants are told about the background of the foods and what was available at the time.
NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1990
While most of us are busy trying to keep up with holiday shopping and cooking, one Ferndale woman has been going a step farther. Sue Latini spent Sunday teaching others how to make delectables like plum pudding, apple sauce fruitcake, fried peach pies, nut candy and cookies.So what's so tough? She cooks over a fireplace, in the manner of a person living in 1840.Latini, founder and president of the Ferndale Garden Club, volunteers at the 1840 House, part of the Baltimore City Life Museums.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
LAST SUNDAY, I was fortunate to be one of a group of 10 people who stepped back to the 19th century for a cooking workshop on an open hearth in the kitchen of the 1840 House, a Baltimore City Life Museum.Sue Latini, food historian and Ferndale resident, coached us as we learned the techniques to prepare a full-course meal. We fed the fire, peeled, cut and chopped ingredients and employed various cooking methods to turn out delicious dishes from the menu, "A Meal For A Fall Day."We used a reflector oven to roast a pork loin, and a dutch oven to bake corn bread and a molasses custard pie for dessert.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
COMPARED TO colonial times, today's cooks have it relatively easy. Maryland may have lost a plentiful supply of many once-indigenous herbs and animals -- certainly the famed terrapin is nearly impossible to find -- but at least contemporary cooks do not have to worry about cooking at an open hearth. If you insist, however, you can.Mary Sue Pagan Latini, of Ferndale, has authored an intriguing 159-page book, "At the Hearth: Early American Recipes," which should be available at many book stores and museum shops from the American Literary Press Inc. for $14.95.
FEATURES
By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
Lord, help my poor soul!" are rumored to be Edgar Allan Poe's last words. It's not clear if he was commenting on the quality of his last meal. The mysterious, macabre Boston-born writer, who died in Baltimore 154 years ago this month, left much of his life to speculation, including the contents of his final meal. With Halloween just around the corner, Baltimore's Flag House & Star-Spangled Banner Museum is taking another stab at that question, sponsoring "Poe's Last Meal," an annual interactive sampling of what the author might have consumed mere nights before his death.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
WOULD YOU rather stroll through a magnificent herb garden or view an art exhibit? At Saturday's "Herbs and Artists" program in Ferndale, there will be no need to choose. You can do both. The program will be at the home of Sue Latini, who has cultivated a garden with more than 130 varieties of herbs. Here, you'll find the familiar - such as oregano and rosemary - and the uncommon. Ever heard of elecampane? It's a plant favored by goldfinches, which love to eat its seeds. "I try to put in something new each year," Latini said.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 2001
FERNDALE RESIDENT Sue Latini has brought her hearthside cooking workshops to the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House in Baltimore. Dressed in period clothing, with a fire properly prepared and blazing behind her, she teaches small groups what it was like to cook in early America. Besides learning what iron pot to use for the chicken with dumplings or how to pile coals on the Dutch oven lid for the fruit cobbler, participants are told about the background of the foods and what was available at the time.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2000
THINGS ARE the same in Bangkok, Thailand, as they are back home, yet very different, I thought as I looked down from the porch of an apartment there every morning for the past month during vacation. Below I could see children going off to school dressed in uniforms of navy skirt and slacks, sun-bleached white shirts and blouses. Off to the side, an electric "sky train" quietly shuttled men and women to their jobs. Barking dogs, the buzzing sound of motorcycles and the honking of cars punctuated the air. Some houses had television antennas on the roofs, and there were partially constructed buildings waiting to be completed.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2000
THE COUSCOUS WAS a disaster, the gravlax fair, the escarole soup delicious, and the Pavlova dessert impressive. The Gourmet Lunch Club has had its successes and failures with recipes, but its friendships and camaraderie have been enduring ingredients. For more than 25 years, each September through May, the club women have been meeting at each other's homes to share recipes and a planned menu. The hostess chooses the menu, and each member volunteers to make a dish. International, regional American and popular family dishes have been some of the choices.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
LAST SUNDAY, I was fortunate to be one of a group of 10 people who stepped back to the 19th century for a cooking workshop on an open hearth in the kitchen of the 1840 House, a Baltimore City Life Museum.Sue Latini, food historian and Ferndale resident, coached us as we learned the techniques to prepare a full-course meal. We fed the fire, peeled, cut and chopped ingredients and employed various cooking methods to turn out delicious dishes from the menu, "A Meal For A Fall Day."We used a reflector oven to roast a pork loin, and a dutch oven to bake corn bread and a molasses custard pie for dessert.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1996
IN TIMES of need, Carroll County residents tend to reach out, to be there, to care. At Carroll Hospice the concern is obvious. When a loved one is dying, the burden can be overwhelming. That is when hospice volunteers reach out with caring hands, warm words and a wealth of resources to share.L Now, Carroll Hospice is making a request for new volunteers.Based in Westminster, Carroll Hospice is a 10-year-old organization that provides support and care, in hospitals and homes, for the terminally ill and their families, and bereavement counseling after the loss of a loved one."
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
WOULD YOU rather stroll through a magnificent herb garden or view an art exhibit? At Saturday's "Herbs and Artists" program in Ferndale, there will be no need to choose. You can do both. The program will be at the home of Sue Latini, who has cultivated a garden with more than 130 varieties of herbs. Here, you'll find the familiar - such as oregano and rosemary - and the uncommon. Ever heard of elecampane? It's a plant favored by goldfinches, which love to eat its seeds. "I try to put in something new each year," Latini said.
FEATURES
By Lisa Wiseman | August 7, 1994
Elvis Sighting?Elvis himself may be seen in Fells Point on Aug. 16 for the "Salute to Elvis Presley Day," which honors the king of rock and roll on the 17th anniversary of his death. So, get out those blue-suede shoes, put on a rhinestone-studded cape, and grow a really cool set of mutton-chop sideburns. Along with Elvis memorabilia displays and live music, there will be an Elvis look-alike contest. Notice we did not say Elvis impersonator contest. No cheesy croonings of "Love Me Tender" will be allowed.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 1996
MAKING A commitment is one thing. Following through is another.Last year, the congregation of Linthicum Heights United Methodist Church promised to raise $6,000 in one year for Habitat for HumanityIn six months, it has raised almost $9,000."
NEWS
September 29, 1995
COMPARED TO colonial times, today's cooks have it relatively easy. Maryland may have lost a plentiful supply of many once-indigenous herbs and animals -- certainly the famed terrapin is nearly impossible to find -- but at least contemporary cooks do not have to worry about cooking at an open hearth. If you insist, however, you can.Mary Sue Pagan Latini, of Ferndale, has authored an intriguing 159-page book, "At the Hearth: Early American Recipes," which should be available at many book stores and museum shops from the American Literary Press Inc. for $14.95.
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