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By Ken Rosenthal | September 11, 1991
No one ever thinks of Frank Robinson as a quitter, but he actually resigned as manager of a Mexican League team in 1978 -- after losing 12 pounds the first month, drinking soft drink after soft drink and finding the language barrier too much to bear.The California Angels fired him as hitting coach during that period, yet that's not what Robinson remembers most. "The walls literally started to close in on me," he recalls, referring to the hours he spent alone in his hotel room, flies buzzing around his head.
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By Craig Clary, cclary@patuxent.com | June 12, 2012
Jimmy Magee, a Cockeysville resident and tennis player for Boys' Latin Middle School, hopes to someday play for the Lakers' varsity tennis team. But what he's doing on the courts thisFather's Day, June 17, could make any contribution he eventually makes for the Lakers pale in comparison. Magee, an ambassador for the charitable organization, Kids Play For Good, is spearheading a doubles tennis tournament to fightParkinson's Disease, and support his uncle, Bryant Waters, who has the disease.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 18, 1994
Carlos Bernhardt wasn't sure he recognized the name."Regan?" the Orioles' Dominican scout asked yesterday, fighting through a faulty phone connection.Phil Regan.Once managed in the Dominican, now manages the Orioles.Suddenly, it hit Bernhardt."We had a big fight," he said.A what?"A big, big, big -- I mean, a big fight."This was in the Dominican League, seven or eight years ago.Bernhardt was a coach with Estrellas. Regan was manager of Azucareros.There was a beanball war.A bench-emptying brawl.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
Boys' Latin senior lacrosse standout R.G. Keenan, who led the No. 2 Lakers to Saturday's Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference title game, was suspended from the school after officials learned on Monday that he had been charged with a number of vehicle violations, including DUI charges, on April 25. According to Baltimore County public records, Keenan, 18, was issued five citations — two DUI citations, driving while impaired,...
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 2, 1992
In four straight trades, the Orioles have parted with Latin players, and outfielder Luis Mercedes could be the next to go. The pattern is disturbing, but the rationale for each deal was legitimate. We'll hold off any indictments -- for now.Under strong urging from club president Larry Lucchino, the front office has done a commendable job reforming an organization once barren of Latin players. But if those players continue to be purged as they reach the major leagues, what's the point?Consider Mercedes.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 26, 1991
Doug Melvin warned it would happen. "You'll never look at Latin players the same way again," said the Orioles' assistant general manager before I left to spend a week studying the baseball life of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.He was right. You see their homes, streets and culture, listen to them tell their life stories, and you might as well go buy a new pair of glasses: Never again will they be just names on my score card.They are sons of a different society, many from desperate homes, their high place in the game achieved even though the vast majority of people in the game -- from fans to administrators -- have made almost no effort to understand them.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | September 10, 1998
Tony Perez, the all-time RBI leader among Latin American players, watched the incredible scene unfold on television.Not Mark McGwire hitting No. 62.The crowd at Busch Stadium cheering an opponent, cheering a Dominican, cheering Sammy Sosa."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
TAMPA, Fla. - New York Yankees pitcher Hideki Irabu made headlines recently when he angrily stomped on the toes of a Japanese cameraman and crushed a videocassette during a post-game interview session.Talk about getting off on the wrong foot again.Irabu has been a staple of the New York tabloids since he made the decision to play in America more than a year ago. His first season was a public relations disaster. He pitched poorly and behaved badly, engendering resentment from his teammates and derision from the stands.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Latin American players are given lessons in English as part of their indoctrination into baseball in the United States. Considering the growing number of Latin Americans wearing Orioles uniforms, the organization may start thinking about teaching Spanish to its English-speaking players.Players from Latin American countries account for nearly a third of those on the Orioles' 40-man roster, along with six of the 22 nonroster invitees. Reliever Armando Benitez is from the Dominican Republic, outfielder Eugene Kingsale is the first major-league player ever from Aruba, second baseman Roberto Alomar hails from Puerto Rico.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 9, 2006
Don't know about you, but I was feeling a little bit left out while Barry Bonds bore down on Babe Ruth the past couple of months. How could you help but pine for those halcyon days when Baltimore was -- for a couple of months -- the center of the steroid universe. Now, you don't have to. Former Orioles pitcher Jason Grimsley, with his tawdry admissions and redacted deposition, has re-established Charm City as the East Coast capital of baseball's still-mushrooming performance-enhancing drug scandal, and I have only one thing to say: Baltimore: Get In On It!
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 9, 2006
Don't know about you, but I was feeling a little bit left out while Barry Bonds bore down on Babe Ruth the past couple of months. How could you help but pine for those halcyon days when Baltimore was -- for a couple of months -- the center of the steroid universe. Now, you don't have to. Former Orioles pitcher Jason Grimsley, with his tawdry admissions and redacted deposition, has re-established Charm City as the East Coast capital of baseball's still-mushrooming performance-enhancing drug scandal, and I have only one thing to say: Baltimore: Get In On It!
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | September 10, 1998
Tony Perez, the all-time RBI leader among Latin American players, watched the incredible scene unfold on television.Not Mark McGwire hitting No. 62.The crowd at Busch Stadium cheering an opponent, cheering a Dominican, cheering Sammy Sosa."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
TAMPA, Fla. - New York Yankees pitcher Hideki Irabu made headlines recently when he angrily stomped on the toes of a Japanese cameraman and crushed a videocassette during a post-game interview session.Talk about getting off on the wrong foot again.Irabu has been a staple of the New York tabloids since he made the decision to play in America more than a year ago. His first season was a public relations disaster. He pitched poorly and behaved badly, engendering resentment from his teammates and derision from the stands.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Latin American players are given lessons in English as part of their indoctrination into baseball in the United States. Considering the growing number of Latin Americans wearing Orioles uniforms, the organization may start thinking about teaching Spanish to its English-speaking players.Players from Latin American countries account for nearly a third of those on the Orioles' 40-man roster, along with six of the 22 nonroster invitees. Reliever Armando Benitez is from the Dominican Republic, outfielder Eugene Kingsale is the first major-league player ever from Aruba, second baseman Roberto Alomar hails from Puerto Rico.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 4, 1994
They're stuck.Cross the picket line, and the striking major-leaguers would never forgive them. Honor it, and the clubs might seek their own retribution.They're confused.Some have changed their minds on whether they'd play. Others loathe the idea of becoming a scab, but might not be financially secure enough to stand on principle.They're divided.Some recognize this might be their only chance to reach the major leagues."If this is the way it's going to come, this is the way it's going to come," said Matt Riemer, a third baseman who played at Single-A Albany and Frederick last season.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 18, 1994
Carlos Bernhardt wasn't sure he recognized the name."Regan?" the Orioles' Dominican scout asked yesterday, fighting through a faulty phone connection.Phil Regan.Once managed in the Dominican, now manages the Orioles.Suddenly, it hit Bernhardt."We had a big fight," he said.A what?"A big, big, big -- I mean, a big fight."This was in the Dominican League, seven or eight years ago.Bernhardt was a coach with Estrellas. Regan was manager of Azucareros.There was a beanball war.A bench-emptying brawl.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 2, 1993
SARASOTA, Fla. -- When the Orioles' Fred Uhlman Sr. told a USA Today reporter that "a genetic-type thing" caused Mexicans to lack foot speed and dance well, he made a terrible mistake. Stereotyping along ethnic lines is thickheaded, offensive and demands a response.But is there a right response this time?The Orioles apologized, but La Raza, an organization that lobbies for Hispanic causes, still demanded last week that Uhlman, a longtime scout, resign. You can't blame it. Stereotyping of Latins in baseball is institutionalized.
SPORTS
By TOM KEEGAN | October 16, 1994
Meet the Texas Rangers.A pitching staff so poor as to be almost painful to watch. Consistently shoddy fundamentals. Botched grounders. Missed cutoff men. Base-running blunders. Runners welded to second base with nobody out, then one out, then two outs. Situational hitting? What's that?Game after game. Year after year.Doug Melvin, charged to right these wrongs as the Rangers' new general manager, will start by hiring a manager.The Rangers are rich with Latin American talent, so look for the manager Melvin hires to relate well to the frustrations Latin players encounter working in a foreign culture.
SPORTS
By TOM KEEGAN | October 16, 1994
Meet the Texas Rangers.A pitching staff so poor as to be almost painful to watch. Consistently shoddy fundamentals. Botched grounders. Missed cutoff men. Base-running blunders. Runners welded to second base with nobody out, then one out, then two outs. Situational hitting? What's that?Game after game. Year after year.Doug Melvin, charged to right these wrongs as the Rangers' new general manager, will start by hiring a manager.The Rangers are rich with Latin American talent, so look for the manager Melvin hires to relate well to the frustrations Latin players encounter working in a foreign culture.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | September 29, 1994
If you're a Rick Dempsey fan, you want to remember him roaring through the 1983 World Series, clowning through rain delays, romping through "Old Time Rock 'n' Roll."You don't want to remember him as another fired Orioles manager.Let's stop this Dempsey madness before it starts. He'd make a great cheerleader, but why would anyone think he'd make a great manager?If this were a popularity contest, we'd all pick the Demper.Alas, it's a search for the man who will lead the Orioles into the 21st century, and Dempsey isn't qualified.
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