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By Alisa Valdes- Rodriguez and Alisa Valdes- Rodriguez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 1999
First, the well-known facts: Puerto Rican pop star Ricky Martin is enjoying phenomenal success with his first English-language album, and more Latino pop artists, such as Enrique Iglesias, are vying to do the same. This has led the U.S. media -- including a Time magazine cover story -- to trumpet a new "Latin crossover phenomenon."Now, the lesser-known facts.One: Many of the so-called crossover artists are Americans by birth, including Martin. But the pervasive impression in the media and in the culture at large is that these artists are exotic foreigners.
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NEWS
June 2, 2011
Sunday, June 5 First Sunday Arts Festival Event features crafts, artists, music, street performers and sidewalk dining from noon to 5 p.m. in the first block of West and Calvert streets in Annapolis. Information: 410-741-3267. Garden tour The 11th annual Secret Garden Tour, sponsored by the Hammond-Harwood House, will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., rain or shine. More than 10 private gardens will be on display in the neighborhood along Spa Creek. Proceeds benefit the education and restoration programs of Hammond-Harwood House.
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By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1997
In an unusual ethnic alliance, a black-run Baltimore radio station will begin broadcasting a bilingual, Latin music show tonight."Fiesta Musical," featuring the syncopated sounds of Latin jazz and salsa, will air from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays on WEAA-FM (88.9), from the campus of Morgan State University.The program is the brainchild of co-hosts Jose Ruiz and Jorge Austrich, two Latino baby boomers who have enjoyed Latin rhythms since childhood."We want you to put on your dancing shoes, but we're also going to talk about how this music came about," Ruiz said.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy | October 21, 2008
For 50 years, Greeks have made their way to Kentrikon, a shop on Eastern Avenue where they come to buy Greek music and trinkets, wreaths for weddings and christening ribbons after babies are born. Only now there is a new draw, and new customers. "Musica Latina de Venta Aqui," reads a sign visible from outside Kentrikon - "Latin music sales here." "The majority of people coming into the area are Hispanic," says owner Nitsa Morekas, 67, explaining her decision to branch out. "It's like Greektown international now."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 26, 1999
Marc Anthony. Mana. Shakira. Elvis Crespo. Luis Miguel. Jaguares. Jaci Velasquez. Los Fabulosos Cadillacs.Their names may not ring a bell right now, but if current trends continue, most of them will be familiar soon enough, as the stars of Latin pop cross over into the Anglo mainstream. Already this year, both Enrique Iglesias and former Menudo member Ricky Martin have topped the Billboard singles chart, while Mana and the Buena Vista Social Club are currently gaining ground on the albums chart.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2005
In many ways, Yolanda Perez is a typical Los Angeles girl. The 22-year-old daughter of tradition-minded Mexican parents, she grew up speaking Spanish and listening to Mexican regional music at home. But at school she spoke English, hung out with black, white, Asian and Middle Eastern kids, and listened to hip-hop and rock. Also like many from her generation, Perez has a boyfriend of a different race and a baby. And she struggles to reconcile her life with the expectations of her family and culture.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 2, 2000
Latin music in the United States has gone through many changes in the last six decades, as its sound evolved from Cubop to mambo, from cha-cha to salsa, and from Latin rock to the latest tropical beats. Numerous stars appeared along the way, but only one seemed to stay the course: Tito Puente. No more. Some 63 years after he began drumming professionally, the great "Mambo King" has laid down his sticks for good. Wednesday evening, Puente died in a New York hospital from complications experienced during heart surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sono Motoyama and Sono Motoyama,Special to The Sun | November 6, 1997
As we head deeper into fall, Baltimore is heating up with Latin music. Latin dance clubs, long a staple of such cities as Washington and New York, are catching on in this area as the Latino population increases.Haydee Rodriguez, the mayor's liaison to the Hispanic community, says of Baltimore's Latinos: "The population has grown tremendously, most definitely. If you look at the number of businesses in the southeast area of Baltimore alone, you see a tremendous growth from two to three business about seven years ago to 15 to 18 today."
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By Jordan Levin and Jordan Levin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 2, 2003
Ricky Martin is back. He still wants your love, but he's not going to dance for it. Forget the white-hot moment as the most famous pop star on the planet, the screaming hordes of females, the supernova glare of publicity. Forget too, those hypnotic she-bang hips, the eye-popping dance machine moves. Now, Martin wants to make it real. He wants to feel. He wants to tone down the speed of his life just like he's toned down the speed of the songs on his new album, Almas del Silencio (Souls of Silence)
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By Agustin Gurza and Agustin Gurza,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 27, 2006
Hips don't lie, Shakira famously sings, but they've sure helped her win accolades, as the Colombian sensation scooped up a field-leading five nominations for the seventh annual Latin Grammy Awards, announced yesterday in New York. The belly-dancing singer-songwriter was the only artist to be named in the song, record and album categories, for her Spanish-language CD Fijacion Oral Vol. 1 and its reggaeton-tinged hit "La Tortura." This marks a triumph for Shakira's bicultural and bilingual music-making strategy, crowning her the most completely adapted crossover performer in contemporary pop music.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,Special to the Sun | May 2, 2008
As days lengthen and leaves unfurl on the trees, songs of spring are in the air everywhere. Tomorrow, the invigorating music of the new season will be sung in Spanish, as Columbia Pro Cantare presents an unusual and ambitious program Latin American Spring at 8 p.m. in Jim Rouse Theatre. Tomorrow's concert will feature the choral ensemble assisted by soprano April-Joy Gutierrez, mezzo soprano Cyndie Eberhardt, pianist Alison Matuskey, and an ensemble of players of indigenous and classical instruments.
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By Agustin Gurza and Agustin Gurza,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 27, 2006
Hips don't lie, Shakira famously sings, but they've sure helped her win accolades, as the Colombian sensation scooped up a field-leading five nominations for the seventh annual Latin Grammy Awards, announced yesterday in New York. The belly-dancing singer-songwriter was the only artist to be named in the song, record and album categories, for her Spanish-language CD Fijacion Oral Vol. 1 and its reggaeton-tinged hit "La Tortura." This marks a triumph for Shakira's bicultural and bilingual music-making strategy, crowning her the most completely adapted crossover performer in contemporary pop music.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2005
In many ways, Yolanda Perez is a typical Los Angeles girl. The 22-year-old daughter of tradition-minded Mexican parents, she grew up speaking Spanish and listening to Mexican regional music at home. But at school she spoke English, hung out with black, white, Asian and Middle Eastern kids, and listened to hip-hop and rock. Also like many from her generation, Perez has a boyfriend of a different race and a baby. And she struggles to reconcile her life with the expectations of her family and culture.
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By DONNA M. OWENS and DONNA M. OWENS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2005
The symptoms: persistent daydreams of warm, sunny destinations. An irrepressible urge to crawl under the covers and hibernate until spring. The diagnosis: the Old Man Winter blues, blahs, and brrrs. Treatment: A bevy of regional escapes and attractions that offer a respite from winter's chill. Visit and repeat as necessary. Prognosis: Full and immediate recovery (and thawing) following treatment as prescribed. Sizzling dances Outdoors it's frigid, and the wind is blowing. But inside the Latin Palace in Fells Point, the temperature is rising as chicos and chicas hit the dance floor for a little salsa, merengue and bachata, all rhythmic dances of Latin origin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Ratliff and Ben Ratliff,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2004
American popular music in the 1950s had Frank Sinatra's duality -- a late-night morbid depression record followed by a bright swinging one. At around the same time, Benny More, El Barbaro del Ritmo, the most popular singer in Cuba, was in the practice of releasing two-sided 78-rpm singles with a dance number on one side (a son montuno or a guaracha) and a bolero on the other. After he left Perez Prado's orchestra in 1952 to return to Havana, his home, and until he died of cirrhosis in 1963, More made his own records for RCA Victor and established himself as the greatest male singer in Cuba.
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By Augustin Gurza and Augustin Gurza,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 5, 2003
MIAMI - On a night when the city celebrated its role as capital of the Latin music industry, Colombian singer-songwriter Juanes consolidated his stature as the genre's leading star, sweeping the top categories at the fourth-annual Latin Grammy Awards. Juanes, who now lives in Miami, a multiethnic tropical metropolis, won trophies Wednesday in all five categories in which he was nominated, including best album, song and record of the year for his second solo work, Un Dia Normal, and its sweet, romantic single "Es Por Ti."
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | November 22, 1991
Whether the musical direction of the guitar duo Duende was a smart career choice or a pleasant detour before a severe reality check is something only time will tell. But in any event, Duende has made a goodbeginning.Ensconced at Sam's Waterfront Cafe since August, the duo, also known as newlyweds Todd and Ann Kreuzeburg of Annapolis, hasbeen performing its blend of contemporary acoustic rock, jazz and the classical Spanish form known as flamenco between 7:30 and 11:30 p.m. for the Friday night dinner crowd.
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By Augustin Gurza and Augustin Gurza,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 5, 2003
MIAMI - On a night when the city celebrated its role as capital of the Latin music industry, Colombian singer-songwriter Juanes consolidated his stature as the genre's leading star, sweeping the top categories at the fourth-annual Latin Grammy Awards. Juanes, who now lives in Miami, a multiethnic tropical metropolis, won trophies Wednesday in all five categories in which he was nominated, including best album, song and record of the year for his second solo work, Un Dia Normal, and its sweet, romantic single "Es Por Ti."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 28, 2003
The so-called "neo-soul" field is already crowded with wannabe-smooth brothers who croon sweet nothings over hip-hop-laced grooves, injecting their sound with heavy Stevie Wonder-isms and Donny Hathaway inflections. A new artist, Javier (pronounced hav-e-air), wants to join the band, so to speak, with a sound that's warmly familiar. Like Glenn Lewis and Maxwell, he sets out to charm the ladies with ballads dripping passion. "I'm an easygoing kind of guy," says the singer, 25, calling from Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Jordan Levin and Jordan Levin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 2, 2003
Ricky Martin is back. He still wants your love, but he's not going to dance for it. Forget the white-hot moment as the most famous pop star on the planet, the screaming hordes of females, the supernova glare of publicity. Forget too, those hypnotic she-bang hips, the eye-popping dance machine moves. Now, Martin wants to make it real. He wants to feel. He wants to tone down the speed of his life just like he's toned down the speed of the songs on his new album, Almas del Silencio (Souls of Silence)
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