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December 16, 2011
Howard County and Columbia claim to be representative of many heritages, but from my perspective it is white-bread, big-box brand name with catering to the upscale community. All the village centers have the standard bank, fast food, drug store, dry cleaners, etc, etc, etc. Why not have something really different to attract more than the Wilde Lake residents? A letter last week mentioned HMart on Rolling Road. In the last few years the Route 40/U.S. 29 Triangle has become a center for Korean food and other Asian shopping attractions.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
I believe that we should attempt to research our claims against people, especially when we generalize about large groups such as the 11 million or more immigrants from Latin America who have been in this country without legal papers ( "Illegal immigrants will destroy America as we know it," Aug. 16). I am closely acquainted with 90 to 100 of the families included in this figure, fine people who have been in Baltimore on average about 10 years. Far from being "dangerous criminals," "traffickers," or "a danger to our security," these moms and dads have stable families, work an average of two jobs between the couples (sometimes three or four)
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 2, 1994
Annapolis -- WHEN I BEGAN covering Latin America as a foreign correspondent 30 years ago, even many Latins direly characterized themselves as "the people who never win." The great Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea had written typically of the pessimism that seemed to infuse Latin America from its very birth: "We carry our defects in our blood."The Latins' abiding pessimism about their prospects was, of course, always exacerbated by the gnawing successes of their neighbor to the north. And, so, "anti-gringoism" and "anti-imperialism" were added to the Latins' geopolitical vocabulary, as the United States, simply by existing, eternally rubbed in their failures.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
Like so many others, I have been closely following the refugee crisis at the southern border. But instead of welcoming these poor children, who are desperate for help, many people refuse to recognize their humanity. For example, the Carroll County Board of Commissioners and Rep. Andy Harris protested the possibility that of some of the child refugees would be housed in Westminster ( "U.S. dismisses Carroll Co. as shelter site," July 13). I immediately thought of the Jewish refugees on the S.S. St. Louis who were turned away from the United States, as many of them died in concentration camps.
NEWS
By Carmen Barroso | May 12, 2005
AS JOSEPH Ratzinger begins his reign as Pope Benedict XVI, he presides over a church quite different from the institution inherited by his predecessor, Pope John Paul II, when he ascended the papal throne 27 years ago. Over the last three decades, the complexion of the Roman Catholic Church has changed significantly. Its center of gravity today lies outside the West. More than 42 percent of all Catholics live in Latin America, where they make up three-fourths of the population. Throughout Latin America, as in the rest of the world, Pope John Paul II was revered for his passion for peace and his indefatigable advocacy of social justice for the poor.
NEWS
By Meghan Finn and Carlee Klingeman | November 3, 2000
WASHINGTON -- To prove his skill at foreign policy, Al Gore must look somewhere other than Latin America. The administration's vaunted democratization project there has all but collapsed and, despite its brimming optimism, the region appears more stressed today than when the Clinton administration took office. The White House obsessively touts free trade and drugs as if these important initiatives exhaust the list of pressing hemispheric concerns, which range from too little social justice and too much courtroom venality to corrupt legislatures and bureaucracies.
NEWS
By Eric Farnsworth and Gary Hufbauer | August 2, 2007
The spirit of Teddy Roosevelt is back in Latin America, and it's not a pretty sight. Despite repeatedly warning against the pitfalls of turning away from our own hemisphere, Congress is nonetheless rapidly lining up behind an updated version of Roosevelt's credo, urging the United States to "speak loudly and carry a whip." Exhibit A: the trade agenda. President Bush's power to "fast-track" trade deals has expired, without much hope for renewal before 2009. The current round of World Trade Organization talks is moribund, thus killing any possibility for a revival of Free Trade Area of the Americas negotiations.
NEWS
By Michael LaRosa | March 19, 2007
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- President Bush's recent journey to Latin America has been played in the media as an epic struggle of the unpopular American president vs. Hugo Chavez, a charismatic Venezuelan caudillo. The media sometimes forget that Latin America is hardly a homogeneous entity. Mr. Chavez's goal - to become a 21st-century pan-Latin American leader - has faced severe scrutiny from fellow Latin Americans who hold a healthy and historic distrust of leaders claiming to speak for all of them.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1990 Washington Post Writers Group | October 10, 1990
NEW YORK -- It is not only grass that's always greener on the other side of the fence. So, apparently, is money.During the 1980s, while America's jet-set investors focused first on the profits in Japan and then in Europe, one of the decade's strongest stock markets was (have you guessed it?) Mexico's.And, while entrepreneurs go tumbling after opportunities in Eastern Europe, the leading countries of Latin America are years ahead in understanding private investment.Until fairly recently, Central and South America had been written off the investment map. Dictatorship, class grievances, corrupt state-owned enterprises, regulated markets, and hostility to outside capital, especially from the United States, have been holding most of those countries in thrall.
NEWS
By Riordan Roett | July 30, 2004
NO MATTER WHO is residing in the White House in January, the next administration will find that it will need to deal with a rapidly changing Latin America. While the trade agenda - the attempt to negotiate a Free Trade Area of the Americas - is the major item under discussion, its future is uncertain. While trade talks have dominated hemispheric affairs for the last decade or so, a number of development issues have arisen that will require a more sophisticated approach in the future. First is the growing discontent with democratic institutions.
NEWS
By Michael D. Barnes | July 8, 2014
A crisis of enormous economic and humanitarian impact is unfolding in Central America, and it's hard to find much mention of it in our national media, other than constant references to a result of the crisis: tens of thousands of human beings, many of them unaccompanied children, trying desperately to enter our country illegally. They are attempting to escape the poverty, gang violence and drug wars raging in their home countries, and they are flooding our border and overwhelming our immigration authorities.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | October 17, 2013
I've spent the last two weeks in Latin America - where they know something about defaulting on public debts. As part of a bipartisan group of former U.S. ambassadors, I met with business leaders, central bankers, government officials and ordinary citizens. They all asked: what is going on in the U.S. Congress? Is the U.S. really going to default on its debt because of the political game playing? Along with my traveling companions, Republicans as well as Democrats, I repeatedly reassured them that we were confident that cooler heads would prevail and default would be avoided.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 1, 2013
Columbia Pro Cantare thematically goes abroad for its concert of "Music of Spain and Latin America" on Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theater at Wilde Lake. Not only will some of this music be unfamiliar to many listeners, but it's also new for the chorus. "It's a complex program," says Columbia Pro Cantare music director Frances Motyca Dawson of a concert that includes pieces from Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela and Cuba. Although Dawson's Howard County-based chorus did a Latin American program in 2008, she says the upcoming concert promises to be even "more inclusive.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Four years ago, Osama bin Laden was at large, the U.S. and world economies were in free-fall, America was bogged down in two wars, and the Bush Administration had lost friends - governments as well as ordinary people - for America around the world. Under President Barack Obama's and Vice President Joe Biden's leadership, all these dangers have been eliminated or reduced. We still have more than enough foreign policy challenges, but in terms of our country's security and economic prospects, we are much better off than we were four years ago. First, with hard power, President Obama has taken out bin Laden and other terrorist enemies of America.
EXPLORE
December 16, 2011
Howard County and Columbia claim to be representative of many heritages, but from my perspective it is white-bread, big-box brand name with catering to the upscale community. All the village centers have the standard bank, fast food, drug store, dry cleaners, etc, etc, etc. Why not have something really different to attract more than the Wilde Lake residents? A letter last week mentioned HMart on Rolling Road. In the last few years the Route 40/U.S. 29 Triangle has become a center for Korean food and other Asian shopping attractions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
Anthony John R. Russell-Wood, a distinguished Johns Hopkins University professor of history whose field of expertise was pre-Columbian and colonial Latin America, died Aug. 13 of melanoma at his Lutherville home. He was 70. Dr. Russell-Wood, who had been a member of the Hopkins faculty since 1971, was a prolific author and one of the world's foremost historians of Brazil and the Portuguese seaborne empire. He had not retired. Dr. Russell-Wood, the son of educators, was born in Corbridge-On-Tyne, Wales, and was raised in Lancashire.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | October 2, 1991
Latin American investing is hot. The stocks and funds that invest in these countries have been sizzling in 1991, based on hopes that the instability of the past won't continue. Privatization of state-owned companies and attempts to rein in economic problems are the reasons behind the euphoria surrounding the issues of these countries."Rich in energy and other natural resources and with a population growth rate three times that of the United States, Latin America is a prime area for long-term investment," advised Jack Lavery, senior vice president of Merrill Lynch global research and economics group.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 26, 1994
Beavis and Butt-head, MTV's famous monosyllabic cartoon duo, are about to make their Latin American debut.Next month, MTV Latino will begin showing the hit half-hour show.Unlike many other programs, the show will run in English, with Spanish subtitles. According to MTV Latino research, Latin kids prefer it that way."We asked them specifically if they prefered to get "Beavis and Butt-head" dubbed or with subtitles, and overwhelmingly they said subtitles," says MTV Latino spokesman Nelson Benedico.
NEWS
January 15, 2010
The horrific images of collapsed buildings and rows of decomposing bodies lying in the streets of Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, have left no doubt as to the magnitude of the human catastrophe that occurred there. One of the worst natural disasters this hemisphere has seen in recent memory, the most powerful earthquake to strike Haiti in 200 years, has hit squarely in the nation least able to cope with it. Haiti has long been the poorest nation in the Americas, and years of dictatorship and corruption have made it especially vulnerable to such a calamity and unable to recover on its own. Within hours of Tuesday's quake, President Barack Obama pledged to assist in the massive international relief effort now under way. Owing to Haiti's proximity and the country's long historical ties to America, it's clear the U.S. must take the lead in search-and-rescue operations and in the reconstruction of Haiti's devastated infrastructure.
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