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NEWS
June 11, 2003
Lawrence Vernon Leitch, a retired supervisor in the Naval Academy's Division of Engineering and Weapons who also managed a family-owned general store, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77. Born in Annapolis and raised in Davidsonville, Mr. Leitch was a 1943 graduate of Annapolis High School. During World War II, he served in the Navy as a machinist's mate in Europe. He was a test mechanic supervisor in the Naval Academy division for 38 years until retiring in 1981.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee and Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com and edward.lee@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
Not taking Rex Ryan's criticism lightly, Paul Kruger lashed back at the former defensive coordinator, calling his comments "childish." Ryan, who is in his first season as the New York Jets coach, said Monday that he was "disappointed that they gave [Michael McCrary's No. 99] jersey to some rookie who hasn't proven" anything. Kruger didn't read what Ryan said or hear a sound bite. But people have relayed the remarks to him. "In my opinion, it's kind of childish," said Kruger, the team's second-round pick this year.
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NEWS
July 13, 2004
Peggy Lou Compton, a retired Social Security Administration employee and avid traveler, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis --Lou Gehrig's disease -- at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 67. Born in Parkersburg, W.Va., the former Peggy Lou Barringer was raised in Akron, Ohio, where she graduated from high school in 1954. She married Gary Compton in 1959, and they moved to the Baltimore area in 1967. They lived in Ellicott City for 15 years. The marriage ended in divorce.
NEWS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | March 10, 2008
O.J. Brigance remembers the 2001 Super Bowl like it was yesterday, when he charged down the field for the Ravens and collided with a kick returner for the first tackle of the game. Now, everyday activities like eating are as challenging as his old workouts. Picking up a fork these days feels like lifting more than a hundred pounds of weights. Brigance, 38, was diagnosed in May 2007 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive and fatal disease that shuts down nerve cells responsible for movement.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
Elaine G. Weinstein, a homemaker and artist, died of Lou Gehrig's disease -- amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- June 21 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Stevenson resident was 79. Born Elaine G. Cohen in Baltimore and raised on Forest Park Avenue, she was a 1943 graduate of Forest Park High School. After earning a degree in early childhood education from Goucher College in 1946, she taught at Arlington Elementary School on West Rogers Avenue from 1948 to 1950. In 1945, she married Dr. Frederick Weinstein, a now-retired Baltimore dentist.
NEWS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | March 10, 2008
O.J. Brigance remembers the 2001 Super Bowl like it was yesterday, when he charged down the field for the Ravens and collided with a kick returner for the first tackle of the game. Now, everyday activities like eating are as challenging as his old workouts. Picking up a fork these days feels like lifting more than a hundred pounds of weights. Brigance, 38, was diagnosed in May 2007 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive and fatal disease that shuts down nerve cells responsible for movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | June 11, 1993
A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME(Paramount, 1991)"I wanted to try to reinvent the documentary genre," Errol Morris recently said. "The documentary for years has been seen as a kind of journalism but rarely as an art form."Mixing dramatic re-enactments and talking-head interviews, Mr. Morris created such a visually convincing argument about the innocence of a man convicted of murder in his widely acclaimed 1988 film, "The Thin Blue Line," and many credited him with the subsequent release of the prisoner.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee and Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com and edward.lee@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
Not taking Rex Ryan's criticism lightly, Paul Kruger lashed back at the former defensive coordinator, calling his comments "childish." Ryan, who is in his first season as the New York Jets coach, said Monday that he was "disappointed that they gave [Michael McCrary's No. 99] jersey to some rookie who hasn't proven" anything. Kruger didn't read what Ryan said or hear a sound bite. But people have relayed the remarks to him. "In my opinion, it's kind of childish," said Kruger, the team's second-round pick this year.
NEWS
By BLYTHE BERNHARD and BLYTHE BERNHARD,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 4, 2005
Augie Nieto first noticed his life had changed when he struggled to lift the same weights he had lifted every day for 30 years. Must be getting older, Nieto, 47, thought. The story, now legend, of Augustine L. Nieto II starts with an overweight child growing up in Anaheim, Calif. Nieto's passion for weight loss and exercise led to a class project as an undergraduate at Claremont McKenna College - starting a strength-training gym. "I was just that kid who found exercise as his fantasy, his religion, his way of being," Nieto said.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
FROSTBURG -- Fate sucker-punched Mike McGlinchey, not once, but twice.First his livelihood was threatened, and then his life. When McGlinchey addresses the football team at Frostburg State University, it's easy to accept the new head coach's bromides about overcoming obstacles and getting the most out of your ability."
NEWS
By BLYTHE BERNHARD and BLYTHE BERNHARD,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 4, 2005
Augie Nieto first noticed his life had changed when he struggled to lift the same weights he had lifted every day for 30 years. Must be getting older, Nieto, 47, thought. The story, now legend, of Augustine L. Nieto II starts with an overweight child growing up in Anaheim, Calif. Nieto's passion for weight loss and exercise led to a class project as an undergraduate at Claremont McKenna College - starting a strength-training gym. "I was just that kid who found exercise as his fantasy, his religion, his way of being," Nieto said.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
Ron Klingner, a beloved Mount Hebron High School biology teacher who is battling an unknown disease, is leaving the classroom for good after some soul searching and repeated advice from his neurologist. His reluctant retirement became effective July 1. "My neurologist has been urging me for a long, long time, and I refused to accept that," said Klingner, who had been on medical leave since March. "I finally had to accept that because I thought about my students this past year and that I wanted to get back to them - and I couldn't and how it was unfair to them.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
Peggy Lou Compton, a retired Social Security Administration employee and avid traveler, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis --Lou Gehrig's disease -- at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 67. Born in Parkersburg, W.Va., the former Peggy Lou Barringer was raised in Akron, Ohio, where she graduated from high school in 1954. She married Gary Compton in 1959, and they moved to the Baltimore area in 1967. They lived in Ellicott City for 15 years. The marriage ended in divorce.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
Elaine G. Weinstein, a homemaker and artist, died of Lou Gehrig's disease -- amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- June 21 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Stevenson resident was 79. Born Elaine G. Cohen in Baltimore and raised on Forest Park Avenue, she was a 1943 graduate of Forest Park High School. After earning a degree in early childhood education from Goucher College in 1946, she taught at Arlington Elementary School on West Rogers Avenue from 1948 to 1950. In 1945, she married Dr. Frederick Weinstein, a now-retired Baltimore dentist.
NEWS
June 11, 2003
Lawrence Vernon Leitch, a retired supervisor in the Naval Academy's Division of Engineering and Weapons who also managed a family-owned general store, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77. Born in Annapolis and raised in Davidsonville, Mr. Leitch was a 1943 graduate of Annapolis High School. During World War II, he served in the Navy as a machinist's mate in Europe. He was a test mechanic supervisor in the Naval Academy division for 38 years until retiring in 1981.
NEWS
By NANCY GALLANT and NANCY GALLANT,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2000
EVERY WEEKDAY morning, just as my husband steps out of the shower, a Metrobus rumbles past our house. "There goes Glenn," says my husband each time, "What an inspiration." Glenn Harwood is indeed an inspiration to hundreds of area commuters who make the daily trek from Crofton to Washington. He faces the same traffic, the same weather problems, the same Metro trains and the same crowds of jostling, impatient commuters that thousands of other area workers do. Harwood is a procurement analyst with the federal government's Small Business Administration, where for 10 years he has been a program manager.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
Mike McGlinchey calls it "the toughest decision I've ever made in my life," but it was one that he couldn't put off any longer.With his health failing and his football team at Frostburg State struggling, McGlinchey met with his players last Thursday and told them he would relinquish his duties as coach after this season.McGlinchey, 50, said he decided to resign at the beginning of the season, his fourth at Frostburg, but had planned on waiting until after the final game to make the announcement.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
Ron Klingner, a beloved Mount Hebron High School biology teacher who is battling an unknown disease, is leaving the classroom for good after some soul searching and repeated advice from his neurologist. His reluctant retirement became effective July 1. "My neurologist has been urging me for a long, long time, and I refused to accept that," said Klingner, who had been on medical leave since March. "I finally had to accept that because I thought about my students this past year and that I wanted to get back to them - and I couldn't and how it was unfair to them.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 30, 1998
NOTEworthy Day:Committee members organizing the reunion of the 1958 world champion Baltimore Colts will salute Peter Angelos for being one of their most ardent fans. Angelos continues to hold an annual ballpark gathering for the players' enjoyment and has been a leader in raising funds for research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) at Johns Hopkins, which is what the Nov. 19 gathering is all about -- plus having a chance to cheer once again for one of football's finest-ever teams.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | June 28, 1998
It was an event that set itself apart, carrying an indelible signature all its own. For the Baltimore Colts, it became a defining moment, playing and winning the first overtime game in pro football. A place in history has been duly documented and perpetuated.The upcoming 40th anniversary of the Colts' first championship is going to be celebrated in Baltimore with style and substance, taking on overtones of a gala civic gathering that will bring coaches and players together for a reunion in a city that reacted as if they, the men and women looking on as spectators, had actually been doing the blocking and tackling -- along with the cheering and, yes, even the praying for a team that was revered as few others have ever been.
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