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NEWS
March 9, 1997
OPPONENTS OF abortion have seized on the issue of "partial-birth" procedures as an effective tool for undermining support for legalized abortion. Although most states already have restrictions on late-term abortions -- a power specifically designated to states in Supreme Court rulings -- Congress appears poised to enact a federal law on the subject.Maryland bans post-viability (third trimester and late second-trimester) abortions except in cases of danger to the life or health of the mother, or severe fetal deformity.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 3, 2014
Wendy Davis, a Democratic state senator running to replace Rick Perry as governor of Texas, owes her political stardom to two things: a pair of pink sneakers and her unstinting support for a woman's right to terminate a late-term pregnancy in a substandard clinic. Yay Feminism! Last year, Davis led an 11-hour filibuster -- that's where the sneakers came in handy -- to block legislation that would ban abortion after 20 weeks and require abortion clinics to meet the same standards that hospital-style surgical centers do. This was all going on against the backdrop of the sensational Kermit Gosnell case in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 20, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising reversal, abortion foes in the House of Representatives voted yesterday to override President Clinton's veto of a bill that would outlaw a late-term abortion procedure denounced by its critics as infanticide.In a 285-137 vote, House lawmakers rejected arguments that the ban would deny women who are experiencing crises pregnancies access to a procedure that could protect their health and future fertility. Opponents said the procedure is grotesque and brings a painful end to a life.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 18, 2013
It was the pictures and riveting testimony that convinced a Philadelphia jury that abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell was guilty of murdering three infants born alive following botched late-term abortions and also guilty of the involuntary manslaughter of Karnamaya Mongar, who overdosed on Demerol during an abortion at Dr. Gosnell's clinic. How ironic that the Gosnell decision was delivered the day after Mother's Day. The two-month trial has reignited the abortion debate. But while many states have managed to impose some restrictions on abortion clinics, establish informed consent laws, and in some cases require a woman to view a sonogram before aborting an unborn child, abortion on demand for almost any reason and at most stages of pregnancy remains legal in every state.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
As early as today, the U.S. Senate will vote on whether to ban "partial-birth" abortions. To do so, it must join the House of Representatives in overriding a veto by President Clinton. But even if the Senate approves the ban, it is unlikely to end abortions performed in the late stages of pregnancy.A congressional ban would end one particular procedure that voices on both sides of the abortion debate agree is the most gruesome and distasteful of all methods used to end pregnancies.In this method, the fetus is usually delivered feet first until all but its head has emerged.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could reverberate through the Republican Party for years to come, anti-abortion activists are seeking to cut off party funds to any candidates who support late-term, or "partial-birth," abortions.The proposal, which will be voted on this month by the Republican National Committee, effectively would end the party's decades-long quest to be a "big tent" that welcomes members from both sides of the divisive issue.It easily could hurt Republicans in close races where party money often makes a difference, as it did for New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman in her 1997 re-election.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court turned aside yesterday the first test case on a new round of laws that are intended to stop abortions from being performed late in pregnancy.Without comment but over three justices' dissents, the court refused to consider a plea by the state of Ohio -- backed by 16 other states -- to reinstate a 1995 Ohio law that sought to impose a flat ban on abortions after about 22 weeks of pregnancy.A federal appeals court based in Cincinnati struck down that law in November.
NEWS
April 27, 2000
An article yesterday about the Supreme Court's abortion hearing described new laws under review as "bans on certain late-term abortions." Whether the laws apply only to "late-term abortions" or to others earlier in pregnancy is a central issue the court will decide. The Sun regrets the implication that the issue is already settled.
NEWS
November 5, 1995
AFTER A DISTASTEFUL debate full of extremist rhetoric, the House of Representatives has voted to criminalize certain late-term abortions. The Republican right led the assault on a medical procedure (intact dilation and evacuation) that is rarely used. Only two American physicians are known to routinely perform it. All late-term abortions account for fewer than 1 percent of the total.Those who insisted that it is important to outlaw them were exaggerating. In that sense those who opposed the House bill were also overly concerned -- except for this: It is just one more step toward encumbering abortion providers by federal fiat.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court sharply narrowed yesterday the authority of states and Congress to ban abortions late in pregnancy, ruling that such bans must allow women to end pregnancies to avoid serious mental or physical health risks.In the first decision by an appeals court on the issue, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals based in Cincinnati struck down a 1995 Ohio law that bars doctors from using an abortion method that has sparked vehement opposition -- the "dilation and extraction" (D&X)
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | May 7, 2013
To those who support "choice" at all costs: Read the grand jury report on Kermit Gosnell. He is the Philadelphia abortion doctor awaiting a verdict in his trial, where he is accused of murdering four babies allegedly born alive and killing 41-year-old refugee Karnamaya Mongar. The charges represent only a fraction of the horrors that went on at the Women's Medical Society clinic, according to the report, where hundreds of children died by "snipping" - his term for sticking scissors into the back of a baby's neck and cutting its spinal cord - and where women were routinely butchered in late-term abortions by untrained medical staff and doped up according to how much they could pay. Here are some lowlights from the report: •"A nineteen-year-old girl was held for several hours after Gosnell punctured her uterus.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The Germantown clinic featured in today's story, “ Maryland abortion protest target takes fight to protesters ,” has been a focal point of the abortion debate over the past few years. Dr. LeRoy Carhartarrived there in late 2010. That year, Nebraska had banned abortions after 20 weeks. Carhart, who performs both early- and late-term abortions, still lives in Nebraska and travels to Maryland to work at the Germantown clinic. Michael Martelli, director of the Maryland Coalition for Life, said Carhart's arrival in Maryland was a “catalyst for the … rising up and unity” of many groups that oppose abortion.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The fliers first showed up in March, dropped on doorsteps of the big homes in Todd Stave's quiet cul-de-sac. They compared him to a Nazi. Two months later and 50 miles away, new anti-abortion leaflets appeared in another peaceful suburban subdivision, this time in Baltimore County. They had the same bloody images. But now, they targeted Stave's in-laws, asking neighbors to pray for the family and to call or visit their home. Protesters had also showed up at his daughter's middle school.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Lawyers for an abortion doctor charged with murder under Maryland's fetal homicide law filed court papers Friday calling the statute illegal and saying that prosecutors are using the law to effectively ban the constitutionally protected medical procedure in Cecil County. The motion - the first detailed defense in the groundbreaking case - also calls the grand jury indictment filed against Dr. Nicola I. Riley, 46, "an attempt to intimidate" physicians into not performing abortions. Riley was ordered held on $300,000 bail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
One of the country's most prominent late-term abortion doctors will begin offering the procedure in Maryland beginning next week, a professional association announced Tuesday. Dr. Leroy Carhart will begin performing both early and late-term abortions at Germantown Reproductive Health Services next week, said Vicki Saporta, president of the National Abortion Federation, a professional association of abortion providers, of which the Germantown facility is a member. Carhart, who is based in Nebraska but is licensed to practice medicine in Maryland, announced earlier in November that he intended to set up shop in the Washington area and in Iowa because of a Nebraska law banning most abortions after 20 weeks into pregnancy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
A New Jersey doctor accused of crossing into Maryland to perform late-term abortions denied many of the allegations against him Tuesday and asked that a complaint against him be dismissed. The complaint by the New Jersey Attorney General's office this month called Dr. Steven C. Brigham negligent in his care of several patients, some of whose abortions were begun in New Jersey and finished in Maryland. One woman required emergency surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, according to the complaint.
NEWS
May 15, 1997
MANEUVERING in Congress over "partial-birth" abortions represents the most successful strategy against legalized abortion in some time. Only a Clinton veto kept a law banning the procedure from going into effect last year. This year, the House has passed the measure with a veto-proof majority, while the Senate appears ready to do likewise, though without a wide enough margin to withstand a veto.So supporters of the measure are not pleased with Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle's proposal for an alternate approach that is attractive to many senators who generally favor abortion rights.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The Germantown clinic featured in today's story, “ Maryland abortion protest target takes fight to protesters ,” has been a focal point of the abortion debate over the past few years. Dr. LeRoy Carhartarrived there in late 2010. That year, Nebraska had banned abortions after 20 weeks. Carhart, who performs both early- and late-term abortions, still lives in Nebraska and travels to Maryland to work at the Germantown clinic. Michael Martelli, director of the Maryland Coalition for Life, said Carhart's arrival in Maryland was a “catalyst for the … rising up and unity” of many groups that oppose abortion.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - The House approved a bill yesterday that would outlaw a disputed form of abortion, moving the measure a crucial step closer to becoming law and imposing the most significant limits on abortion in three decades. The bill, which would ban a procedure critics call "partial birth" abortion, passed 282-139. The Senate approved a nearly identical bill in March, 64-33. The two chambers are expected to quickly resolve the sole difference between their versions and send the bill to the White House.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Opening a new phase yesterday in the volatile judicial debate over abortion rights, the Senate passed legislation banning a procedure its opponents call "partial-birth" abortion, paving the way for its enactment this spring. The action was a triumph for the Republican Congress and for President Bush, who cheered the vote, calling the abortion method "an abhorrent procedure that offends human dignity." The Senate's vote "is an important step toward building a culture of life in America," Bush said.
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