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By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1995
San Francisco Giants hitting coach Bobby Bonds and manager Dusty Baker criticized Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda for saying he was surprised that the New York Yankees would sign anybody who was suspended for taking drugs -- Darryl Strawberry, for instance."
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By Sports Digest | December 14, 2010
College basketball Loyola's Walker, Coppin's Gallo earn conference awards Loyola junior forward Shane Walker was named the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference men's Co-Player of the Week on Monday. Walker recorded his fourth and fifth career doubledoubles while helping the Greyhounds to a 1-1 week. He averaged 18 points and 10 rebounds while shooting 57.1 percent from the field (12-for-21), 62.5 percent from 3-point range (5-8) and 87.5 percent from the foul line (7-for-8)
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June 4, 1991
The 33-year-old son of Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda died yesterday of pneumonia.Thomas C. Lasorda Jr. died at his Santa Monica, Calif., home, said Lee Solters, spokesman for the family. His father, mother and sister were at his side when he died, said Solters.The younger Lasorda was born in Greenville, S.C., and became an artist. He had been ill for about five weeks and was hospitalized briefly at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.Dr. Allen Metzger, who had been treating Lasorda, said he died of pneumonia and severe dehydration.
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By COMPILED FROM INTERVIEWS AND OTHER NEWSPAPERS' REPORTS | July 16, 2006
He knew he was an unexpected invite last week. The Hollywood kid with spiky hair and a megawatt smile, Freddy Sanchez looks like he should be playing a baseball player on TV, not hanging with Albert Pujols and Nomar Garciaparra at the All-Star Game. Improbably, Sanchez has gone from utility infielder to All-Star in three months. "It's one of those things that's like, `Who would have thought?' Who would have thought I would have been an All-Star coming into the year?" Sanchez said. Last season, Sanchez showed he could stick in the majors for the first time, batting .291 in 132 games.
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March 25, 1992
Forget all that talk about Tom Lasorda's leaving the Los Angeles Dodgers. He's planning to stick around for a while.Lasorda, 64, got a one-year contract extension yesterday that will take him through 1993. He'll begin his 16th season as the Dodgers manager on April 6.Lasorda was the subject of much speculation earlier this spring. His contract was set to expire at the end of the season and questions had been raised about his future.But Dodgers president Peter O'Malley said there was no question that Lasorda would be back.
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By John Strege and John Strege,Orange County Register | July 14, 1991
Fourteen seasons have passed in his unlikely but not unremarkable career, and it might be said Tom Lasorda virtually has done it all. He has run the gamut, from A to Y.It was little more than a hour before his 15th season was to begin and Lasorda was working on some Z's. The Dodgers' manager was asleep in the visitors clubhouse at Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta. Lasorda asleep? A man of boundless energy, he had spent the previous 14 years in perpetual motion. He deserved a snooze.Besides, Lasorda by now can rest assured his place in baseball history is secure.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Buster Olney contributed to this article | February 20, 1995
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- Orioles owner Peter Angelos has been trying to steer clear of controversy the past few weeks, but it always seems to find him.Last week, there was the report that he had refused the San Diego Padres permission to interview assistant general manager Frank Robinson, then his much-publicized change of heart. Two days later, there was his decision to inform competing teams that the Orioles would only play spring games against legitimate minor-league players.The weekend brought another headline -- atop a report in yesterday's Los Angeles Times that Angelos had offered the Orioles managerial position to Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda last September.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Baltimore hasn't cornered the market on managerial intrigue. Both of the managers in the best-of-five series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds )) have heard their job security questioned, even as they guided their teams to division championships.Reds manager Davey Johnson has been considered a lame duck since the season began. The word around Cincinnati was that owner Marge Schott had promised the job in 1996 to coach Ray Knight, though it would be hard to replace one of the winningest managers in the history of the game if the Reds fight their way into the World Series.
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By John Steadman | November 1, 1991
Measure Thomas Charles Lasorda on the goodness of the man. He has been one of the most successful of contemporary baseball managers but, again, that's not important. He has gone through life in the style of a modern Johnny Appleseed, spreading good will and contributing to the cause of humanity in ways this world will not always know about.He's an entertainer, a raconteur and his wife of 41 years facetiously says he loves the Los Angeles Dodgers and baseball more than he does her. "Yes," he answers with a wink, "but I love you more than football or basketball."
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December 28, 1993
American League home run champion Juan Gonzalez of the Texas Rangers and former Cincinnati Reds star Tony Perez headline the 41st annual Tops in Sports Banquet scheduled for Jan. 14 at Towson State University.They will be joined by Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda, Orioles manager Johnny Oates and pitchers Rick Sutcliffe and Fernando Valenzuela.The banquet begins with a reception at 6:15 p.m., followed by dinner and the program. Tickets are $45 and can be obtained by calling (410) 242-3552.
BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | July 4, 2006
DaimlerChrysler AG's Chrysler Group plans to thin its top management ranks by 15 percent within three years, with the bulk of the job cuts taking place this year, Chrysler Chief Executive Officer Thomas W. LaSorda said Sunday. Trimming the number of executives is part of an overall reorganization at DaimlerChrysler announced in January. DaimlerChrysler CEO Dieter Zetsche announced plans then to eliminate 6,000 positions to cut costs and streamline jobs across the German-based company's operations.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2005
DETROIT - Thomas W. LaSorda has a background unlike any other top auto executive in Detroit: The union runs in his blood. LaSorda, a 51-year-old Canadian, was named yesterday as chief executive of DaimlerChrysler's Chrysler division, succeeding Dieter Zetsche, who will head the parent company. While the Ford Motor Co.'s top executive, William Clay Ford Jr., for example, is the nephew, grandson and great-grandson of former leaders of his company, LaSorda's lineage is on the union side of the fence.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICES | July 29, 2005
DETROIT -- DaimlerChrysler AG's embattled Chairman Juergen E. Schrempp, who oversaw the 1998 merger that created the German-American automaker, said yesterday that he would step down at the end of the year. He will be replaced by Dieter Zetsche, who has revived the sales and profits of the company's Chrysler division in nearly five years as its chief. The surprise announcement, coinciding with DaimlerChrysler's second-quarter earnings report, follows continuing criticism of Schrempp's leadership and a contentious shareholder meeting in April as the combined company struggles to be consistently profitable.
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By John Eisenberg | September 28, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - You can't make it into a baseball version of hockey's "Miracle on Ice," when a team of American collegians beat professional Soviet stars in the 1980 Winter Olympics. This wasn't nearly that unlikely. Not when Cuba also lost to that noted baseball power, the Netherlands, earlier in the tournament. Not when the Cubans were using, as U.S. manager Tom Lasorda said, "a bunch of guys who were 33, 35, 36 years old." No, it wasn't an imposing, dominating Cuban machine that the United States beat last night to win the Olympic gold medal in baseball for the first time.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - Hey, it's not political. It's baseball. At least, that's the world according to Tom Lasorda, who vowed to win one for the Cuban exiles in Miami and then watched last night as his U.S. Olympic baseball team was thumped by Cuba, 6-1. So what if the benches emptied, spikes flew and tempers flared? "We're thinking about winning the game," said Lasorda, the American coach. "Who the hell is thinking about diplomatic relations?" It was testy, cranky baseball played out by two teams that have already clinched places in the medal round.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 23, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - After the game, Tom Lasorda grabbed Italy manager Silvano Ambrosioni. Speaking with his best Italian accent, Lasorda said, "Hey, Paesano, why don't you play like that all the time?" Both men laughed. Lasorda's, though, was mixed with a touch of relief. Italy, known for its pasta, not its baseball, took the mighty United States to the limit before losing, 4-2, yesterday. Italian pitcher Jason Simontacchi gave Lasorda the ultimate gift on the U.S. manager's 73rd birthday.
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By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
Tom Lasorda is like Jason from Friday the 13th: He survives. Somehow, he always comes back. If the Los Angeles Dodgers hadn't qualified for the postseason, that probably wouldn't be the case. Los Angeles owner Peter O'Malley thought Lasorda deserved a 20th year as manager for his long and relatively good service for the club. Another factor, however, is that the club doesn't have an heir apparent.A few years ago, ex-Dodgers shortstop Bill Russell was being groomed as Lasorda's replacement, but his luster has faded.
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By BUSTER OLINEY | June 25, 1995
Ben McDonald's shoulder is sore and he goes on the disabled list. Kevin Brown's finger is dislocated and he's sidelined for perhaps a month. The Orioles are some eight games behind the Boston Red Sox.Much more of this and it could be time to just start planning and playing for the future. Play Manny Alexander every day at second base. Play Jeffrey Hammonds every day in right field (and leave him there). Leave Scott Klingenbeck in the rotation and find out whether he'll ever be more than a guy who just gives you a chance to win. Call up Brian Sackinsky, Jimmy Haynes, Mark Smith, Alex Ochoa, find out what they can do. Find out whether they can help.
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By John Eisenberg | September 19, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - The baseball competition in the 2000 Summer Olympics is a hoot. And the biggest hoot is Tom Lasorda, back in the dugout at age 72 and blowing enough smoke to blot out the sun. Aussie baseball crowds cheer the loudest for foul balls and get play-by-play over the public address system from an announcer who says, "It's the top of the fourth innings, mates." About a third of the fans know to rise after the top of the seventh and sing "Tike My Ewt to the Bull-Gime." (Local pronunciation.
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By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
On a summer day in 1951, a young Keith Harmeyer hung over the railing at Municipal Stadium while the Orioles warmed up for their International League game against Montreal. The 7-year old was watching his Northwood neighbor, Howie Moss, toss the ball around, when Moss noticed him and asked the Royal he was playing catch with to toss Harmeyer a ball. That man was Tommy Lasorda, and 49years later Harmeyer has finally gotten his prized catch signed. Harmeyer was just one of the at least 100 spectators at Oak Crest Village yesterday, listening to the man who bleeds Los Angeles Dodger blue.
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