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NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2002
Every morning Linda Shope makes herself an optical sandwich. She puts in her soft contact lenses, inserts hard contacts on top of them, then dons a pair of tinted eyeglasses. And she still can't see well enough to drive a car or write a check. "I'm hoping I can have a cornea transplant," says Shope, 53, of Waldorf. "What hurts is my whole life has turned upside down." In June 1998, Shope heard a radio commercial extolling the virtues of Lasik eye surgery: Throw away your glasses and contacts -- forever!
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
Salary: $32,000 Age: 23 Years on the job: One How she got started: : After graduating from West Virginia University with a bachelor's degree in communications and broadcasting, Green decided to move back to her hometown of Hanover, Pa. She said she wanted a job that used her communication skills but where she could also help people. "What I'm doing right now is very rewarding." Typical day: : Green works five days a week, starting at 8 a.m. Much of her job is focused on patient consultations.
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TOPIC
By Paul Wenske | February 11, 2001
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A year ago Martha Gershun thought it would be great to ditch her glasses and, like a million other people, have her eyeballs sculpted to improve her vision. Now she's seeing red. "It was a whim. I thought it would be cool," she said. A friend encouraged her. And TV ads implied near-perfect sight. But a year later, Gershun is angry. Her eyes are so dry and painful all the time that she can't read to her daughter at night. "Having refractive eye surgery was probably the worst decision of my life," said the president and chief executive of BizSpace, a local Internet publishing company.
FEATURES
February 28, 2008
Study to focus on LASIK, depression Ophthalmology Patients who undergo vision-correcting laser eye surgery sign a release form with an extensive list of risks, but some researchers and former patients say a potential complication is not mentioned: depression that can lead to suicide. In response to patient complaints, the Food and Drug Administration plans to convene a large, national study to examine the relationship of LASIK complications and quality of life, including psychological problems such as depression.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and By Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
Molly Gardner sits up in her surgery bed at Mercy Medical Center and opens her eyes. "Can you see the clock?" asks Dr. Sheri Rowen, her ophthalmologist. "Ten after nine," the Ellicott City resident says with exuberance not usually associated with telling time. Fifteen minutes ago, she needed glasses or contacts to see the clock. Now, after a surgical procedure called phakic IOL, in which Rowen implanted a contact lens behind Gardner's iris, her vision has improved to 20-20. The corrective surgery procedure, currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States, is not yet available commercially.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
Salary: $32,000 Age: 23 Years on the job: One How she got started: : After graduating from West Virginia University with a bachelor's degree in communications and broadcasting, Green decided to move back to her hometown of Hanover, Pa. She said she wanted a job that used her communication skills but where she could also help people. "What I'm doing right now is very rewarding." Typical day: : Green works five days a week, starting at 8 a.m. Much of her job is focused on patient consultations.
FEATURES
February 28, 2008
Study to focus on LASIK, depression Ophthalmology Patients who undergo vision-correcting laser eye surgery sign a release form with an extensive list of risks, but some researchers and former patients say a potential complication is not mentioned: depression that can lead to suicide. In response to patient complaints, the Food and Drug Administration plans to convene a large, national study to examine the relationship of LASIK complications and quality of life, including psychological problems such as depression.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 8, 2000
FROM ALL indications, there are only about a dozen people in the entire United States who haven't had laser vision correction surgery, me being one of them. A friend of mine just had it done and she keeps chirping: "It's great! I can see! And they don't even give you anesthesia!" Which to me is not exactly a good thing. Look, if they're shooting lasers into my eyes, I want anesthesia, OK? I want to be out like someone whacked me over the head with a shovel. Either that or I want an open bar in the waiting room.
FEATURES
By Jo Bremer and Jo Bremer,Sun Staff | September 20, 1998
With the surgical blade poised above my right eye, the last thing on my mind is moving. I'm not even breathing."Are you with me?" Dr. Anthony J. Kameen asks."
NEWS
By SHARI ROA and SHARI ROA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
The big promise of Lasik vision-correction surgery - that you could throw away your glasses and contacts - was only a half-truth, as maturing Lasik patients are beginning to realize. Lasik has become hugely popular over the past decade, especially among young adults. But by middle age, virtually everyone develops presbyopia, the inability to read or focus close-up. So even former Lasik patients are rummaging through drugstore racks for a pair of reading glasses that won't make them look like grandparents.
NEWS
By SHARI ROA and SHARI ROA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
The big promise of Lasik vision-correction surgery - that you could throw away your glasses and contacts - was only a half-truth, as maturing Lasik patients are beginning to realize. Lasik has become hugely popular over the past decade, especially among young adults. But by middle age, virtually everyone develops presbyopia, the inability to read or focus close-up. So even former Lasik patients are rummaging through drugstore racks for a pair of reading glasses that won't make them look like grandparents.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2002
Every morning Linda Shope makes herself an optical sandwich. She puts in her soft contact lenses, inserts hard contacts on top of them, then dons a pair of tinted eyeglasses. And she still can't see well enough to drive a car or write a check. "I'm hoping I can have a cornea transplant," says Shope, 53, of Waldorf. "What hurts is my whole life has turned upside down." In June 1998, Shope heard a radio commercial extolling the virtues of Lasik eye surgery: Throw away your glasses and contacts -- forever!
TOPIC
By Paul Wenske | February 11, 2001
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A year ago Martha Gershun thought it would be great to ditch her glasses and, like a million other people, have her eyeballs sculpted to improve her vision. Now she's seeing red. "It was a whim. I thought it would be cool," she said. A friend encouraged her. And TV ads implied near-perfect sight. But a year later, Gershun is angry. Her eyes are so dry and painful all the time that she can't read to her daughter at night. "Having refractive eye surgery was probably the worst decision of my life," said the president and chief executive of BizSpace, a local Internet publishing company.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 8, 2000
FROM ALL indications, there are only about a dozen people in the entire United States who haven't had laser vision correction surgery, me being one of them. A friend of mine just had it done and she keeps chirping: "It's great! I can see! And they don't even give you anesthesia!" Which to me is not exactly a good thing. Look, if they're shooting lasers into my eyes, I want anesthesia, OK? I want to be out like someone whacked me over the head with a shovel. Either that or I want an open bar in the waiting room.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and By Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
Molly Gardner sits up in her surgery bed at Mercy Medical Center and opens her eyes. "Can you see the clock?" asks Dr. Sheri Rowen, her ophthalmologist. "Ten after nine," the Ellicott City resident says with exuberance not usually associated with telling time. Fifteen minutes ago, she needed glasses or contacts to see the clock. Now, after a surgical procedure called phakic IOL, in which Rowen implanted a contact lens behind Gardner's iris, her vision has improved to 20-20. The corrective surgery procedure, currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States, is not yet available commercially.
FEATURES
By Jo Bremer and Jo Bremer,Sun Staff | September 20, 1998
With the surgical blade poised above my right eye, the last thing on my mind is moving. I'm not even breathing."Are you with me?" Dr. Anthony J. Kameen asks."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
University of Maryland eye doctors said yesterday that they will use mobile lasers to offer vision correction at sites around Baltimore in partnership with a Colorado firm. The Maryland Center for Eye Care, the ophthalmology faculty practice group of the University of Maryland Medical Center, will provide the surgeons, while Colorado-based ClearVision Laser Centers will own the lasers and provide the technicians. "Instead of owning five or six lasers, we buy one or two and move them," said Michael E. Bjoro, senior administrator for the department of ophthalmology.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | January 30, 2005
Leave it to the Internet to take panhandling to a new level. Laurentiu Mata (his friends call him Larry) tried to raise $2,700 for his wedding. (It was a bad idea, said Mata, 28. Nobody donated, but plenty gave him their two cents.) Joyce wants LASIK surgery. There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of examples of cyberbegging, a trend made famous in 2002 when Karyn Bosnak created www.savekaryn.com to find donors to help her pay down $20,000 in credit-card debt. (She ended up with $13,323 in donations.
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