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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 17, 2007
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Kelly Brannigan was suffering from a case of tattoo remorse. Just a year ago, Brannigan, 24, who holds up Case No. 24 as one of the models on the NBC game show Deal or No Deal, had been full of hope when she and her fiance had each other's names tattooed across their inner wrists. But now, when she looks at the letters - P-A-T-R-I-C-K - she is reminded of a failed relationship. For help, she turned to Dr. Tattoff, a chain of tattoo-removal stores where nurses use lasers in a series of treatments to break down tattoo pigments.
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NEWS
May 12, 2007
THEODORE H. MAIMAN, 79 Built first laser Theodore H. Maiman, a physicist who built the first working laser in the United States and advocated its use in medical applications, died Sunday at a Vancouver, British Columbia, hospital of a rare genetic disorder called systemic mastocytosis, said his wife, Kathleen. Mr. Maiman made his laser discovery in 1960, while working for Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, Calif., using a high-power flash lamp and a synthetic ruby crystal. He described his approach as "ridiculously simple," despite worldwide competition to be the first to develop a working laser.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the Sun | December 27, 2006
Laura Khoury's birthday is Dec. 23. She likes to do something extra-special for her big day so it doesn't just become part of the overall holiday festivities. This year, for her 10th birthday, Laura opted for a party at ShadowLand, the laser adventure center in Columbia. She had gone to ShadowLand for a friend's birthday party, she said, and had really enjoyed it, even though her team didn't win the laser tag game. "It was really fun," she said. "I was in last place, but I really liked it."
NEWS
by Shari Roan and by Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | December 15, 2006
You once adored Janie, but Laura is your honey now. That dragon circling your arm wowed your college buddies, but the executives in the office aren't nearly as impressed. Just as the number of Americans sporting tattoos has soared in the past decade, so has membership in another group: people who want their bodywork removed. Only then do they come to know the truth -- that laser tattoo removal is painful, expensive and may not do the job completely. Soon there may be a solution to the phenomenon of tattoo regret -- removable tattoo ink. A company founded by doctors says it will begin selling such ink early next year.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2006
HOUSTON -- In this gun-loving state, nearly everyone can enjoy the pleasure of the hunt - even those who can't see what they're shooting at. But now, a Texas legislator is proposing to give legally blind hunters more of a fighting chance by allowing them to use laser sights to target their prey. And no, Vice President Dick Cheney is not a beneficiary of the legislation, although plenty of bloggers and amateur comedians are having a good time joking that he is. Rep. Edmund Kuempel, a Republican from Seguin, east of San Antonio, has introduced a bill to exempt legally blind people from a Texas law that prohibits hunters from using laser sights or lights in hunting.
NEWS
By KRISTEN GERENCHER and KRISTEN GERENCHER,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 20, 2006
Got ink? Sporting a tattoo or two is no longer the taboo counterculture act it once was. But it can still present employment, health and financial concerns, experts said. Once the exclusive domain of bikers, gangs and other rough riders, tattoos have gone mainstream with the help of TV programs such as Miami Ink. Today, brokers and secretaries are just as likely as bartenders and street punks to have one. Advances in tattoo-removing laser technology have driven more people to sample the trade, adding images to their legs, feet, arms, lower backs and other places, said Dr. Bruce Katz, director of the JUVA Skin and Laser Center in New York.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Your breath may tell the world what you ate for lunch or that you had too many margaritas to wash it down. But researchers in Baltimore and elsewhere are collaborating on a new, laser-based breath analyzer that can go far beyond that, picking up hidden clues about your health. "The concept is simple. You can measure in the breath what you measure in the blood," said Dr. Steven Solga, an expert on liver disease at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Breath tests have long been used to identify drunken drivers.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2006
While songs like Aretha Franklin's "Respect" blared through speakers set up in Manchester Elementary School's gymnasium, Alex Rufe and Ashley Merryman could hardly stay seated on the floor. Instead, the third-graders and their classmates clapped and sang along to the music, which was being featured in a laser light show. "It was awesome," said Alex, 8, after the show. The 45-minute program highlighted how the songs of African-American musicians and the work of civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. have influenced musicians today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
Buying a printer for your home - whether for work, school or recreation - begins with a basic choice: inkjet or laser. A decade ago, the choice for most home users was an inkjet, which hit the market in 1992. Laser printers existed back then - a desktop model was introduced in 1984 - but were so expensive that they were far outside the grasp of most home users. Then about five years back, black-and-white laser printers plunged in price, becoming affordable for those who wanted fast, professional-looking documents at home.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2005
DENVER -- As planes mosey 800 feet overhead, on their way to touch down at Denver International Airport, there is a ghostly roar - caused by turbulence left in the engines' wakes, mostly in the form of two horizontal tornadoes, one near each wingtip. On bad-weather days, it is the fear of those tornadoes, called wake vortexes, that determines how close the next airplane can follow. That, in turn, determines how many airplanes can land on a runway in an hour. But in a windblown wheat field two miles north of the runway end, something new is listening to that roar.
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