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Laser Surgery

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BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
BETHESDA -- After a year of hearing doctors say they would perform surgery in their offices if only they could justify purchasing the equipment, Paul R. Herchman figured out a way to let them have their cake and eat it, too.The former medical equipment salesman purchased smaller versions of the high-tech equipment he sold to hospitals, and began taking them around to doctors' offices as needed, billing insurance companies directly for their use. Today his...
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Moira Mattingly had only been pregnant for about 24 weeks - still plenty of time, she thought, to pick a name for her daughter. So when she went to the hospital with some discomfort - small pains coming every seven minutes - the news that she was going into labor was alarming. The baby's lungs weren't fully formed, her skin barely so. Mattingly was also confronting sobering statistics: Babies born before 26 weeks, called micropreemies, can easily die and have a high chance of lifelong medical problems like cerebral palsy and blindness.
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FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | January 19, 1993
To cover the incision from Dale Borgman's recent bac surgery, his doctor needed only a Band-Aid. That's because the incision consisted of a single needle puncture.Yet that needle -- as skinny as a plastic coffee-stirrer -- contained a miniature laser and fiber optic lens that made it possible for Sacramento orthopedic surgeon Paul Lim to operate on the ruptured disk that had plagued Mr. Borgman for several months. The procedure was done in a half hour.Dr. Lim and other doctors believe the laser surgery, which has been used on a small scale around the country, may revolutionize back surgery, allowing those who suffer from debilitating back and leg pain to be cured relatively easily.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | March 8, 2011
— The Orioles cruised through the first three weeks of spring training without major incident, a fact that — whenever presented to manager Buck Showalter — invariably caused him to rap his knuckles on anything in the vicinity that was made of wood. There was the usual assortment of rehabbing players, even a little intrigue when Brian Roberts missed a few days with a sore neck and Justin Duchscherer was shut down briefly with a sore hip, but there was plenty of time for everything to come together and — seemingly — good reason for all the happy faces around the newly renovated Ed Smith Stadium complex.
FEATURES
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Not long after Laureen and Lewis Newberg got married last December, the bride began to consider sleeping in a different bedroom."It was very, very rough," recalls Mrs. Newberg. "We were newlyweds and I thought to myself, 'What have I gotten into?' "Her husband snored. Loudly. So loudly, she had trouble sleeping. So loudly, the couple's children from previous marriages complained about The Noise."They would say they couldn't hear the TV, and they were downstairs," she says.But the Newberg house slumbers peacefully these days thanks to a new and increasingly popular laser procedure to treat snoring -- a problem that afflicts an estimated 30 million Americans.
FEATURES
By Jo Bremer and Jo Bremer,Sun Staff | September 20, 1998
With the surgical blade poised above my right eye, the last thing on my mind is moving. I'm not even breathing."Are you with me?" Dr. Anthony J. Kameen asks."
NEWS
December 23, 1991
The Artist's Flat, a 20-year-old Cape St. Claire business, was recently purchased by the Clegg Corporation, and will be operated by the firm's principals, John and Valerie Clegg, former Cape St. Claire residents.The store will continue to serve the Broadneck community, and still house the Cape St. Claire postal station.The Artist's Flat offers novelties, art and office supplies.The change in ownership was finalized in November, and The Clegg Corporation was represented by Dodie & Co., an Annapolis-based small-business counseling firm.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
Max Yokono, the fifth and tallest of 11 children, came to America by way of Cameroon in hope of playing basketball.The basketball future of the 6-foot-7, 240-pound Yokono, a foreign exchange student at Archbishop Spalding, will be determined today at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.A unique and expensive laser surgery made possible by the generosity of many will be performed to repair cartilage damage in Yokono's right knee. The injury was caused by playing on outdoor, concrete courts in his African native land.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 4, 1991
TEMPERING my joy over the kids returning to school is the fact that I'll soon be asked to endure that hellish experience known as Back-to-School Night.This is the evening when moms and dads are expected to squeeze into tiny classroom desks and tiny classroom chairs and engage in probing question-and-answer sessions with their child's teacher about the coming school year.After sitting in these cramped prototypes from the Keebler Elves line of furnishings, my first question to the teacher is usually: "Who's going to pay for the laser surgery on my back when they have to fuse a couple of disks together?"
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | July 10, 1992
The morning after Lois H. Edwards ended a 30-year teaching career, she started going blind.She was driving with her husband and suddenly couldn't read the license plates or the street signs ahead. "This came like a shot out of hell," said the 63-year-old woman, who was beginning to lose sight at the center of her vision."The feeling of knowing suddenly you were losing your eyesight was a horror -- not being able to see to read, not being able to see color, not being able to see your husband's face was just a horror."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2001
An eye-drop solution that aims to assist the healing process after laser vision correction surgery is the latest innovation to spring from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, and apparently the best project the lab had to offer for 2000. The drops - and their APL creator Dr. David M. Silver - were named invention and inventor of the year at an APL awards ceremony last month at the southern Howard County campus. The plasminogen activator drops, which stimulate an enzyme that helps the eye to heal itself, are not in clinical trials, but a Salt Lake City medical company has grabbed the option to license the technology.
FEATURES
By Jo Bremer and Jo Bremer,Sun Staff | September 20, 1998
With the surgical blade poised above my right eye, the last thing on my mind is moving. I'm not even breathing."Are you with me?" Dr. Anthony J. Kameen asks."
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
Max Yokono, the fifth and tallest of 11 children, came to America by way of Cameroon in hope of playing basketball.The basketball future of the 6-foot-7, 240-pound Yokono, a foreign exchange student at Archbishop Spalding, will be determined today at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.A unique and expensive laser surgery made possible by the generosity of many will be performed to repair cartilage damage in Yokono's right knee. The injury was caused by playing on outdoor, concrete courts in his African native land.
FEATURES
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Not long after Laureen and Lewis Newberg got married last December, the bride began to consider sleeping in a different bedroom."It was very, very rough," recalls Mrs. Newberg. "We were newlyweds and I thought to myself, 'What have I gotten into?' "Her husband snored. Loudly. So loudly, she had trouble sleeping. So loudly, the couple's children from previous marriages complained about The Noise."They would say they couldn't hear the TV, and they were downstairs," she says.But the Newberg house slumbers peacefully these days thanks to a new and increasingly popular laser procedure to treat snoring -- a problem that afflicts an estimated 30 million Americans.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
BETHESDA -- After a year of hearing doctors say they would perform surgery in their offices if only they could justify purchasing the equipment, Paul R. Herchman figured out a way to let them have their cake and eat it, too.The former medical equipment salesman purchased smaller versions of the high-tech equipment he sold to hospitals, and began taking them around to doctors' offices as needed, billing insurance companies directly for their use. Today his...
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Proponents of radial keratotomy call the brief surgical procedure a "5-minute miracle" that corrects myopia and sometimes even eliminates the need for glasses or contact lenses.Skeptics say the irreversible procedure is unperfected and not worth the risk it poses to the vision of those with healthy, albeit nearsighted, eyes.The operation, which is designed to reduce mild to moderate myopia, involves making four to 16 "pie-cut" incisions in the cornea, flattening it out and changing the way light rays focus on the retina.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Proponents of radial keratotomy call the brief surgical procedure a "5-minute miracle" that corrects myopia and sometimes even eliminates the need for glasses or contact lenses.Skeptics say the irreversible procedure is unperfected and not worth the risk it poses to the vision of those with healthy, albeit nearsighted, eyes.The operation, which is designed to reduce mild to moderate myopia, involves making four to 16 "pie-cut" incisions in the cornea, flattening it out and changing the way light rays focus on the retina.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Moira Mattingly had only been pregnant for about 24 weeks - still plenty of time, she thought, to pick a name for her daughter. So when she went to the hospital with some discomfort - small pains coming every seven minutes - the news that she was going into labor was alarming. The baby's lungs weren't fully formed, her skin barely so. Mattingly was also confronting sobering statistics: Babies born before 26 weeks, called micropreemies, can easily die and have a high chance of lifelong medical problems like cerebral palsy and blindness.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | January 19, 1993
To cover the incision from Dale Borgman's recent bac surgery, his doctor needed only a Band-Aid. That's because the incision consisted of a single needle puncture.Yet that needle -- as skinny as a plastic coffee-stirrer -- contained a miniature laser and fiber optic lens that made it possible for Sacramento orthopedic surgeon Paul Lim to operate on the ruptured disk that had plagued Mr. Borgman for several months. The procedure was done in a half hour.Dr. Lim and other doctors believe the laser surgery, which has been used on a small scale around the country, may revolutionize back surgery, allowing those who suffer from debilitating back and leg pain to be cured relatively easily.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | July 10, 1992
The morning after Lois H. Edwards ended a 30-year teaching career, she started going blind.She was driving with her husband and suddenly couldn't read the license plates or the street signs ahead. "This came like a shot out of hell," said the 63-year-old woman, who was beginning to lose sight at the center of her vision."The feeling of knowing suddenly you were losing your eyesight was a horror -- not being able to see to read, not being able to see color, not being able to see your husband's face was just a horror."
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