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Laser Printers

BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1991
Users pay a price for the crisp output of a laser printer, and not just the cost of the printer itself.Instead of an inexpensive inked ribbon to produce images, laser printers use a black powder called toner to create the printed page, in a process nearly identical to that used in a photocopier.Sooner or later, you'll have to add more toner to the printer, usually in the form of a replaceable cartridge.You can expect to pay $60 to $100 per cartridge, depending on what other replacement parts come with cartridges for a given printer model.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 4, 2000
IF YOU WATCH YOUR MONEY carefully, you've noticed that it's been changing over the past few years. The presidents' faces on new bills larger than a dollar are bigger than they used to be and off-center. Some of the ink changes color when viewed from different angles, and there are microscopic inscriptions in unlikely places. These changes were expensive for the Bureau of Printing and Engraving, but there was a good reason for making them - computer printers were becoming so good and so cheap that a clever criminal with a scanner and a little larceny in his heart could print his own money and pass it as the real thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
Buying a printer for your home - whether for work, school or recreation - begins with a basic choice: inkjet or laser. A decade ago, the choice for most home users was an inkjet, which hit the market in 1992. Laser printers existed back then - a desktop model was introduced in 1984 - but were so expensive that they were far outside the grasp of most home users. Then about five years back, black-and-white laser printers plunged in price, becoming affordable for those who wanted fast, professional-looking documents at home.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1991
Midsize successes"They do all sorts of things 'wrong,' and yet measured by any yardstick you care to name, they nevertheless run laps around the competition," say management researchers Donald Clifford Jr. and Richard Cavanagh, in their book, "The Winning Performance."In their research on more than 6,000 midsize companies, Mr. Clifford and Mr. Cavanagh unearth key success strategies.Size or niche? During the 1980s, niche clearly won over size. More than 90 percent of the successful companies studied were niche players.
BUSINESS
By Opinion on stocks offered by investment expert. Compiled by Steve Halperm for Knight Ridder | July 22, 1992
Adobe SystemsAdobe Systems (OTC, ADBE, $40.25) is one of Shearson Lehman Brothers' midyear list of "Ten Uncommon Values.""Adobe Systems produces graphics software for printers and computers. Its growth has been fueled by the rapid growth of laser printers and the fact that graphics is the fastest-growing area in personal computer software. Adobe is creating an impregnable franchise that deserves a premium valuation. The company generates strong cash flow, and has a debt-free balance sheet.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | August 14, 1991
Call it ExamScam.Mercantile Safe Deposit & Trust Co. customers are finding notices in their checking account statement this month warning them that telephone con men have found one of the most creative ways yet of reaching out and touching your wallet -- by claiming to be federal bank examiners.The irony of con men pretending to be the very people who are supposed to keep banks honest is lost on few. These fine "public servants" just need a little help from you or your business -- in the form of your checking account number -- to conduct a very, very important investigation.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1994
U.S. Trust to sell businessU.S. Trust Corp. agreed yesterday to sell its securities processing business to Chase Manhattan Corp. in a $363.5 million stock swap.New York-based U.S. Trust said the sale would allow it to focus on its core businesses of asset management for individuals, institutions and mutual funds, private banking, special fiduciary services and corporate trust -- areas in which the company has expanded nationally in recent years.Coffee prices expected to dropCoffee prices, which have risen sharply since April, will soon become more affordable.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
Police say stores sold tobacco to minors Two Harford County businesses were recently found in violation of the state law against selling tobacco to minors. Harford County Health Department's tobacco enforcement manager, a Harford county officer, and a 16-year-old volunteer conducted unannounced tobacco compliance checks at 13 county businesses to determine whether merchants are complying with the Maryland Youth Access Law. At Meller Food Marts, 2403 Rocks Road, the 16-year-old was asked for identification and still was sold cigarettes.
NEWS
July 28, 1997
Computers are donated to Vantage HouseJeanne Miles, owner and founder of ElderComp, and Frank Funderburk, a health research consultant, have donated computers to Vantage House for residents' use and will provide basic instruction to computer novices and answers to technical questions for those more familiar with the technology.Three computers with color and laser printers will be available, as well as instruction videos and books.Future expansion includes a possible hookup to the Internet.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | June 11, 1995
If you think resume-writing is a chore or feel intimidated by the process, you might be interested in computer software designed specifically for the purpose.At first I wasn't keen on the idea, because of the risk that all resumes would come out looking mass-produced. But after trying out three resume packages, I'm convinced of their potential.Design is the chief virtue of the packages I examined, all of which operate on IBM-based Windows systems. They are PFS:Resume by Softkey International, WinWay Resume from WinWay Corp.
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