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BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1990
LAST TIME AROUND, I wrote about the advantages of laser printers, which combine computer electronics with copier technology to turn your PC into a miniature typesetting shop.With street prices now under $1,000 for low-end models, laser printers are attractive buys for small businesses and even home users who demand high quality and speed.But laser printers have their problems and limitations. Before you buy one, think carefully about what you need and how much time you're willing to put into getting a printer to work the way you want it to.While laser printers produce superb text and graphics for correspondence, reports and proposals, they're not much good for two common business applications -- mailing lists and multi-part forms.
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NEWS
By Zainab Al-Suwaij | September 24, 2012
Today I am an angry Arab Muslim woman - outraged, as a person of conscience, over the attacks on American embassies and the murder of a talented diplomat who represented me. After the 2005 cartoon riots, no one should be surprised by Muslim fanatics' irrational violence. Yet seeing history repeated - not as farce but as brutal tragedy - is a wake-up call. We must confront hard truths and take bold action against behavior that is completely unacceptable. Let's be clear: a silly film on YouTube is simply an excuse.
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BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS and PETER McWILLIAMS,1990 Universal Press Syndicate | September 12, 1990
What do laser printers by Apple, Brother, Hewlett-Packard and QMS all have in common? Their insides -- the "engines" -- are all made by Canon.One of the great features of the Canon engine, which I've extolled before, is that when you replace the toner cartridge you're also replacing, within the cartridge, the drum and many of the printer's moving parts. It's like the oil filter of your car containing the valves and cylinders of your engine.The reason this is great is that maintenance is kept to a minimum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 20, 2001
FOR THE LAST couple of years, most of the attention in the printer world has focused on ink jets, and with good reason. Ink jet printers have become incredibly cheap, and they're good at a wide variety of jobs, ranging from business letters to party invitations to high-resolution color photographs. Laser printers, by comparison - the wonder tools of the '80s and early '90s - seem too dowdy and too expensive for home use. But there's a good reason to consider a laser printer for your home office or a college dorm room.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 11, 1994
I've been beating up my Hewlett Packard LaserJet II for about four years now, and it shows no signs of quitting.This is good news and bad news. Good news, because the LaserJet is the best piece of computer equipment I've ever owned. Just last week I used it to turn out three revisions of a 235-page book, and it never complained once.The bad news is that there's no way I can justify buying a newer and niftier printer when the old one works just fine. For a gadget guy like me, that's frustrating.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | November 26, 1990
JUST A FEW YEARS AGO, laser printers were so expensivethat that companies installed computer networks just to allow their employees to share them.But they were worth the $5,000 price tag. Laser printers could churn out documents that looked like they'd popped out of an IBM Selectric typewriter at the unheard of speed of six pages a minute. That was about 20 times as fast as the quickest letter-quality printer. And they were mercifully silent -- no noisier than the average desktop copying machine.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1991
Ever since Apple Computer Inc. announced the first deskto laser printer in 1985, the precise pages it produced have inspired thousands of cases of printer envy.Only well-heeled computer owners could afford the luxury of a printer that then cost thousands of dollars, even though it was typically shared by three or four computers. Indeed, Apple's then-Chairman Steven P. Jobs boasted that the LaserWriter, with its own microprocessor and memory, was the most powerful computer Apple had ever made.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | June 15, 1992
You can tell a lot about a business by the quality of the junk mail it produces.If someone tries to sell you goods or services with a flimsy flier that looks like it was printed with one of those kiddie programs that does party invitations, chances are you'll toss it in the trash without a second glance.But when someone sends you a colorful brochure, with typeset-quality printing and graphics on heavy, coated stock -- with a Rolodex punch-out -- chances are you'll at least look at it before you throw it in the trash.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | March 13, 1991
Apple Computer Inc., which has achieved remarkable success in the last five months with its low-cost Macintosh Classic and Macintosh LC personal computers, now has a pair of low-cost, laser-quality personal printers to go along with them.In the same announcement Monday, Apple also introduced its long-awaited Truetype font technology and cut the prices of most of its other laser printers by $500 to $1,000, depending on the model. The new Truetype technology is included in an operating system upgrade called version 6.0.7 that users can get from their dealers.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 11, 1993
Three years ago I bought a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet II printer. I plugged it in and put it to work, and it has been turning out beautiful documents ever since. It's the best piece of computer equipment I've ever owned.A couple million other people have done the same thing, and w have a problem now. While there are newer printers with higher resolution and fancier features, it's hard to justify spending the money on one when the old LaserJet is still working perfectly. And given HP's industrial-strength design, the old LaserJet is likely to keep chugging away for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2000
A laser printer that produces business-quality documents usually carries a minimum $400 price tag. But attention, laser shoppers -- there's now a half-price sale. At $199, Samsung's ML- 4500 is the first laser printer to break the $200 barrier, and while it won't give you stellar performance with photos, it's fast and reliable with most other jobs. Printing at eight pages per minute and offering 600 dpi resolution, the 13-pound ML- 4500 offers specifications that are as good as its $400 counterparts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 28, 1998
A friend called the other day to tell me the good news: He was finally replacing a computer he had bought during the second Reagan administration.No, there was nothing wrong with the old box - it still started up every day, and he'd used it to write a couple of books. But no one had written any new software that would run on the machine for the last six or seven years, and he was eager to try out this Internet thing.Being a thorough fellow, he had done his research on processors, disk drives, video cards and monitors.
BUSINESS
By Steven Kreytak and Steven Kreytak,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 18, 1998
John and Marianne Wells have engineering degrees from Virginia Tech University but, between them, they've lost five jobs. Ten years ago they decided that was enough, made themselves the bosses and haven't looked back since.Their business is not glamorous -- it literally leaves participants in a cloud of black dust -- but remanufacturing toner cartridges for laser printers is prospering in Maryland and the nation.Most remanufacturers are people with an entrepreneurial spirit who want to make extra income, counter a pink slip or simply break the chains of having a boss.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | November 17, 1996
IF YOU'RE shopping for a computer this holiday season, don't make the printer an afterthought. It's one of the most important parts of your system.For the kids, the right printer can be not only an aid to schoolwork, but also an invitation to creativity. If you use a printer in your business or profession, your printer determines how the world sees you -- and you want to look good.Luckily, there has never been a better time to jump into the printer market. New technology and old-fashioned competition have produced a crop of powerful and affordable machines.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN MANES | May 6, 1996
COLOR INK-JET printers keep getting better and better. Just when you think they have run out of tricks, a new model comes along and pulls a banner out of its paper tray. Not to mention a mouse.The latest from the Hewlett-Packard Co. is the Deskjet 682C, which costs about $330. It is the first ink-jet printer I have seen that is specifically designed to print banners without making you paste pages together. Once you slide a prominent lever, you can use continuous-feed paper and extend a colorful "Welcome Home!"
NEWS
August 5, 1994
Someone stole a laser jet printer Wednesday morning from the loading dock of the Maryland Messenger Service in the 800 block of Airport Park Road, county police said yesterday.A manager at the company called police at noon Wednesday to report the theft, which police said occurred between 8 a.m. and 8:30 a.m.James Fagan, 51, told police that the printer, a Hewlett Packard Laser Jet Plus 4, arrived in an 8 a.m. shipment. A half-hour later he noticed someone had switched the Hewlett Packard with another printer.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1991
Macintosh owners used to have to choose between expensive, PostScript-equipped laser printers and far cheaper -- and lower-resolution -- ImageWriter dot-matrix printers.That's no longer the case.Apple Computer's Personal LaserWriter LS, introduced in March, is the first laser printer from Apple that doesn't use the PostScript printer language. Instead, it relies on QuickDraw, the built-in drawing language of every Macintosh. It still provides high-resolution printing of type but uses an Apple type font technology called TrueType instead of the PostScript fonts.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | October 14, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc., returning its attention to the desktop publishing market that made the Macintosh computer so popular, has introduced two new laser printers and a remarkable new scanner system.The scanner software, in particular, is a breakthrough product that promises to make it much simpler for average users to incorporate pictures into their laser-printed documents.Three new technologies are employed in Apple's products. One is called Fineprint, which is built into both of the new printers and which appears to be very similar to the Resolution Enhancement Technology pioneered by the Hewlett-Packard Co.Fineprint alters the placement of the little dots that make up text and drawings, reducing or eliminating jagged lines.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 11, 1994
I've been beating up my Hewlett Packard LaserJet II for about four years now, and it shows no signs of quitting.This is good news and bad news. Good news, because the LaserJet is the best piece of computer equipment I've ever owned. Just last week I used it to turn out three revisions of a 235-page book, and it never complained once.The bad news is that there's no way I can justify buying a newer and niftier printer when the old one works just fine. For a gadget guy like me, that's frustrating.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | October 4, 1993
Years ago, one of my television heroes was Jim Rockford, the private eye played to world-weary perfection by James Garner.Rockford had a couple of things I admired. One was the best answering-machine message I've ever heard: "This is Jim Rockford. Leave your name and number, and I'll get back to you."In an answering-machine world of music, poetry, singing kids and phony marshmallow folksiness, Rockford's message was beautifully direct and to the point.That has nothing to do with computers, but I had to mention it. The other thing Rockford had was an amazing ability to switch identities, a feat he accomplished with a little printing press he kept in his car.If he wanted to be president of the Acme Widget Corp.
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