Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLaser Gun
IN THE NEWS

Laser Gun

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 25, 2010
Zack Barry is training to become a police officer. But for the moment, there are more pressing matters to attend to. Like pressing the button on his laser gun, and making sure he tags more people than tag him. Almost every week, Barry and his friends can be found at XP Laser Sport in Reisterstown, pointing concentrated beams of light at one another, exulting in every hit and snarling in disgust whenever they're the ones being tagged. "It's a lot more complicated than people think," the 22-year-old Howard Community College grad says of laser tag, the '80s entertainment-center phenomenon that's gaining a whole new generation of fans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 25, 2010
Zack Barry is training to become a police officer. But for the moment, there are more pressing matters to attend to. Like pressing the button on his laser gun, and making sure he tags more people than tag him. Almost every week, Barry and his friends can be found at XP Laser Sport in Reisterstown, pointing concentrated beams of light at one another, exulting in every hit and snarling in disgust whenever they're the ones being tagged. "It's a lot more complicated than people think," the 22-year-old Howard Community College grad says of laser tag, the '80s entertainment-center phenomenon that's gaining a whole new generation of fans.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Sgt. Wesley J. Picha stood along Rock Spring Road in Bel Air holding the Harford Sheriff's Office's newest weapon to catch speeding motorists: a laser speed gun.As Picha peered through the gun's scope Wednesday, a narrow infrared beam tracked vehicles traveling into town on the 40-mph roadway. With the press of a button, the speeds of the vehicles were immediately displayed. Police didn't pull anyone over for a citation, but they plan to use the high-tech piece of equipment for just that.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Boosting the claims of laser technology advocates, a Howard County Circuit Court judge found a Gaithersburg man guilty of speeding yesterday, but suggested that state legislators should authorize use of laser guns for traffic enforcement.Judge Raymond Kane Jr. said he was convinced that the LTI 20 20 laser gun had been scientifically proved reliable even though state legislators haven't made its use by state and local police formal.Judge Kane said the evidence provided in court last week was enough to convict David Goldstein, a Gaithersburg transportation consultant, of driving 74 mph in a 55 mph zone near U.S. 1 in Jessup on July 17, 1992.
FEATURES
By Tom Incantalupo and Tom Incantalupo,Newsday | April 30, 1992
Chronic speeders will soon have a new weapon against The Law: a --board detector that purportedly can warn drivers if police are stalking them with their newest gadget, a laser gun.The leading manufacturer of laser guns, however, claims that a detector will be useless against its device.Cincinnati Microwave Inc. says that it will begin delivering its $99 laser detector in June.Laser guns are used against speeders by an estimated 50 police departments nationwide. (The laser guns are not being used by the Baltimore City Police Department or the Maryland State Police, according to spokesmen for those agencies.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Boosting the claims of laser technology advocates, a Howard County Circuit Court judge found a Gaithersburg man guilty of speeding yesterday, but suggested that state legislators should authorize use of laser guns for traffic enforcement.Judge Raymond Kane Jr. said he was convinced that the LTI 20 20 laser gun had been scientifically proved reliable even though state legislators haven't made its use by state and local police formal.Judge Kane said the evidence provided in court last week was enough to convict David Goldstein, a Gaithersburg transportation consultant, of driving 74 mph in a 55 mph zone near U.S. 1 in Jessup on July 17, 1992.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
A Howard County judge heard conflicting information yesterday about the accuracy and reliability of laser guns used by police officers to nab speeders on Maryland's highways.Circuit Judge Raymond Kane Jr. is expected to issue a ruling Monday in the case of David Goldstein, a Gaithersburg transportation consultant challenging the kind of laser gun used to snare him for speeding.Mr. Goldstein, 46, was clocked at 74 mph in his 1987 Audi by a Howard County police officer operating a laser gun along Route 32 near Jessup on July 17, 1992.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 29, 1997
The CIA understands how to extend benign U.S. influence into the benighted Third World: Torture them into democracy.First, catch your atom. Freeze until hard. Then load, aim and -- pow! -- you have an atom laser gun. Cool.Enough people partied on the streets of Green Bay, Wisconsin, to overthrow a small Balkan country.Smart growth = dumb politics.Pub Date: 1/29/97
NEWS
November 19, 1990
If you're a turkey of a driver, you'd better be careful on Thanksgiving: The Maryland State Police may pluck you from the road.Throughout the weekend, State Police will be experimenting with a laser speed gun as they enforce the 55-mph speed limit on Maryland's interstate highways.The gun emits an infrared laser beam that targets vehicles surpassing the speed limit."The laser speed gun offers the law-enforcement community state-of-the-art technology designed to enhance safety on our highways," said Col. Elmer H. Tippett, State Police superintendent.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
If you've got a $200 radar detector in your car and you think you'resafe from traffic cops, then you haven't been hit by a laser beam yet.The latest road weapon against speeding motorists is a laser gun, and county police are one of three Maryland police departments whoare giving the device a trial run pending approval from the courts."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
A Howard County judge heard conflicting information yesterday about the accuracy and reliability of laser guns used by police officers to nab speeders on Maryland's highways.Circuit Judge Raymond Kane Jr. is expected to issue a ruling Monday in the case of David Goldstein, a Gaithersburg transportation consultant challenging the kind of laser gun used to snare him for speeding.Mr. Goldstein, 46, was clocked at 74 mph in his 1987 Audi by a Howard County police officer operating a laser gun along Route 32 near Jessup on July 17, 1992.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Sgt. Wesley J. Picha stood along Rock Spring Road in Bel Air holding the Harford Sheriff's Office's newest weapon to catch speeding motorists: a laser speed gun.As Picha peered through the gun's scope Wednesday, a narrow infrared beam tracked vehicles traveling into town on the 40-mph roadway. With the press of a button, the speeds of the vehicles were immediately displayed. Police didn't pull anyone over for a citation, but they plan to use the high-tech piece of equipment for just that.
FEATURES
By Tom Incantalupo and Tom Incantalupo,Newsday | April 30, 1992
Chronic speeders will soon have a new weapon against The Law: a --board detector that purportedly can warn drivers if police are stalking them with their newest gadget, a laser gun.The leading manufacturer of laser guns, however, claims that a detector will be useless against its device.Cincinnati Microwave Inc. says that it will begin delivering its $99 laser detector in June.Laser guns are used against speeders by an estimated 50 police departments nationwide. (The laser guns are not being used by the Baltimore City Police Department or the Maryland State Police, according to spokesmen for those agencies.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ed Heard contributed to this article | May 13, 1994
Maryland's highest paid lobbyist was in Howard County Circuit Court yesterday, defending a motorist who contends that state lawmakers have never authorized police to operate the kind of laser gun used to snare him for speeding.The case of David Goldstein has become a magnet attracting special interests on both sides of the speed enforcement issue, including Annapolis attorney Bruce Bereano, who was paid $10,000 in 1993 for lobbying for RADAR, an Ohio-based association of radar detector manufacturers.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Annapolis Police Cpl. Jim Olienyk set out Thursday to test the latest high-tech device to catch speeders and wound up in a wild chase that didn't end until the car he was pursuing got stuck in a pool of cement.To top it off, he captured a man who had gone AWOL from the Calvert County Detention Center's work release program.The patrol officer was tracking traffic with a new laser gun on Tyler Avenue in Eastport about 2:45 p.m. when a car drove by at 39 mph, 14 mph over the limit.Corporal Olienyk flagged down the driver, later identified by police as Eddy R. Requilman, 20, of Calvert County, and began writing tickets because the three passengers were drinking beer in the car.The driver took off, squealing down Summerfield Drive and Woods Road, with the officer close behind.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.