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Lasagna

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NEWS
By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 2005
A great party is something people remember, which is why you should serve the perfect buffet dish: lasagna. It's virtually a one-dish meal, and it's an inexpensive way to feed a crowd. Lasagna does require a fair amount of prep work, but when it's done, you're done. Like other pastas, it's open to interpretation. You can make it with meat, poultry, seafood or vegetables, a marinara or bechamel sauce. Whatever combinations you choose, these tips will help you make memorable lasagna: To keep the noodles from clumping together, drop just a few at a time into a pot of boiling water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Fazzini's Taverna had been open only about six weeks when we visited on a Saturday night. The restaurant, which occupies the old Piv's location on York Road in Cockeysville, was very crowded, with a 45-minute wait for a table if you were silly enough not to make a reservation on a Saturday night. There is a good explanation for the out-the-door crowds. Fazzini's Taverna is just about the most all-around satisfying restaurant I've reviewed in months and months. We had a great meal here, excellent service and a wonderful time.
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NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 2, 2006
Good lasagna is easy to make, and bad is easier still. Great lasagna, that's something else altogether and best left to someone who has studied the craft for decades under an expert from the Old Country. We're talking about a mama who knows lasagna, because her nonna taught it to her mama, who taught it to her. "I always watched my mother," confirms Joann Simonetti, one such pasta pro who lives in Chicago Heights. "I used to watch her and help her." Simonetti's lasagna is unbelievable, a beef-and-ricotta version that is simultaneously light and indulgent, with support from the tomato puree that her son Ron preserves from his garden.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
I want to do a lasagna garden. Will that work over a zoysiagrass lawn? Garden author Pat Lanza popularized this method of soil preparation and gardening and has coined it "Lasagna Gardening. " This is a great time to start a new garden for next year, using this method of alternating layers of newspapers, glass clippings, shredded leaves and compost. Yes, when you cover your present lawn with the layers of the "lasagna," it will kill anything growing below that needs sunlight to survive.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 28, 2001
SOMETIMES THE answer is making lasagna. Your 401(k) is shriveling. Your kids are sick and unhappy. Not only is the world giving you and your mate the short end of the stick, it also seems to be whopping you with it. To make yourself feel better, you cook lasagna, all day. You start with the meat sauce. As two tablespoons of chopped onions sizzle in three tablespoons each of olive oil and butter, they send out an aroma of anticipation, a whiff of good times to come. The smells get sweeter as you add chopped celery and carrots, two tablespoons each.
FEATURES
By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | May 19, 1993
At a time when cooks clamor for quick, easy recipes that ar low in fat and calories, lasagna -- time-consuming and rich, with layers of noodles, cheese, meat and sauce -- remains popular.It's second only to spaghetti and meat sauce in the affection of pasta lovers, according to a National Pasta Association survey. Nearly a fourth of the respondents picked lasagna as their family's favorite pasta dish.Once, lasagna was mainly white noodles, tomato sauce with meat, ricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | November 16, 2003
Can I make lasagna one day, and then cook it the next day? Not only is lasagna an ideal meal to prepare today and cook tomorrow, it's great to prepare today, freeze, and cook next month. The only thing you need to be careful about is proper storage. If you are planning to cook it with a day or two, place the prepared lasagna in an airtight container. If you are freezing it, first wrap the pan in plastic wrap and then wrap tightly again in foil. You need that plastic wrapp first so the acids in the tomato sauce don't start to break down the foil.
FEATURES
By Marie Piraino and Marie Piraino,EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | September 25, 1996
Lasagna is like a sandwich: you can put anything between the layers and it's still lasagna. In the United States, lasagna is actually the ultimate Dagwood, always assembled following the "more is better" model.In its home of origin, however, lasagna is a very different animal. While it certainly ranks as one of the richest dishes in the Italian repertoire, it's almost austere compared to its American catch-all counterpart. In Italy, lasagna has more vegetables and lighter sauces -- and less cheese -- making it a much lighter dish.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 15, 1997
It's mom food.It's love.It's abbondanza, or abundance.It's lasagna.This striated extravaganza, Italian in name and American in spirit, is a marvel, architecturally and culinarily. Its eye-popping layers of oozing cheese, ruffled noodles and rich sauce continue to enchant, even with so many trendy Italian menu newcomers that would seem to threaten its eminence."People never tire of lasagna," says Joe Decker, a partner in Chicago-based Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises. "It's a homey way of satisfying yourself with basil, tomato, cheese, pasta -- basic Italian flavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The only thing more shocking than Italian pasta from a microwave is how great it can be. At Daniela's Pasta and Pastries, a tiny, two-table Hampden restaurant, entrees are kept in a glass deli case, and re-heated to order in one of the microwave ovens. What good, you may ask, can come from a nuke job? If the Lasagna alla Bolognese ($6.99) is any indication, this method works quite well. Daniela's lasagna is handmade-on-site, with a rich red meat sauce rendered pink by a bechamel that totes a wisp of nutmeg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Liz Williams from Newton, N.C., wanted help finding a recipe for making baked lasagna that she had lost. She said the recipe came from a box of pasta she was using probably around 20 years ago, and it was the best lasagna ever. Back-of-the-box recipes are always popular and reliably good. I received quite a few of them from readers for baked lasagna from several different pasta brands. I decided to test the one Kay Sauvageot from Joppa shared that she said she came from a box of Mueller's lasagna noodles, circa 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Anna Di Pierno's little charmer of a restaurant has been around for about seven years, operating under the name Pasta Blitz. If you go looking for it, though, look for Il Basilico. Di Pierno has taken a deliberate approach to the name change, but the transition is almost complete. The neon sign above the restaurant, located in a Timonium strip mall, still carries the old name, but virtually everything inside is now emblazoned with the Il Basilico logo. The menu has been changing gradually, too. The main part still consists of Italian-American favorites - lots of them - things like veal Parmigiana, homemade lasagna Bolognese and chicken cacciatore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The only thing more shocking than Italian pasta from a microwave is how great it can be. At Daniela's Pasta and Pastries, a tiny, two-table Hampden restaurant, entrees are kept in a glass deli case, and re-heated to order in one of the microwave ovens. What good, you may ask, can come from a nuke job? If the Lasagna alla Bolognese ($6.99) is any indication, this method works quite well. Daniela's lasagna is handmade-on-site, with a rich red meat sauce rendered pink by a bechamel that totes a wisp of nutmeg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Kathleen Wilson from Laurel was looking for a recipe she lost during a move for what she called "lazy-day lasagna". She said the original recipe came from the back of a Mueller's pasta box some 25 years ago and was very good and easy. Donna Smith from Baltimore saw Wilson's request and said she "had to smile". She said that her mother gave her this recipe back in 1973 at her bridal shower as one of several "must-have" dishes for any new bride. Smith says that this lasagna comes together quickly and is very satisfying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
I'm always surprised that Baltimore County has so many chains and doesn't have more nice local restaurants - the kind that seem to pop up every other week in Baltimore City. If this bothers you, too, you'll be happy that Restaurant Sabor is now open in the Lutherville/Timonium area. You may not know the owner and chef by name; but if you eat out a lot, you've probably tasted Rodolfo ("Roddy") Domacasse's good cooking at Brasserie Tatin, Due or Rudys' 2900 (all three now closed); Linwood's; Gertrude's at the BMA; or Donna's.
TRAVEL
September 7, 2008
John McCain's choice for a running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, may have been a cold shock to some pundits, but her state has long been a hot tourist destination. Alaska's rustic beauty, from Mount McKinley to the Inside Passage, attracts adventurers, nature lovers, sports enthusiasts and more. The state offers glaciers, fjords, lakes, mountains, parks, Native American culture and wildlife, to name just a few of the tourist draws. Here are five things to do in and around Anchorage: 1 Visit Wasilla : Governor Palin's hometown - and the place where she served as mayor - is about a 45-minute drive from Anchorage.
FEATURES
By Wendy Lin and Wendy Lin,newsday | April 26, 2000
When no-boil "instant" lasagna noodles first hit supermarket shelves five years ago, some home cooks were skeptical. How can you layer sheets of raw pasta into a lasagna pan without boiling them first? Rather than risk a trayful of precious ingredients, they passed up the convenience and continued to parboil their noodles the usual way. Others threw caution to the wind and boldly substituted the stiff-as-a-board pasta into their lasagna recipes. It worked. And those home cooks have never looked back.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson and Patsy Jamieson,EATING WELL | September 30, 1998
Several years ago, I was challenged to revamp the favorite family recipes of each of the hosts on ABC's "Good Morning America." Working out a delicious low-fat version of a recipe in the test kitchen is one thing, but demonstrating it to the host on live national television is quite another!I have to admit that Spencer Christian's recipe for a classic, homey lasagna really had me puzzled at first. It wasn't because it was so laden with fatty ingredients that I couldn't imagine how to make it healthy, but because it was already pretty lean - at least as lasagnas go. Spencer's recipe used ground turkey rather than beef and part-skim instead of whole-milk ricotta.
NEWS
By Ishita Singh and Ishita Singh,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
A simple dish of spinach lasagna sent Daniela Useli on a journey many home cooks dream of - from preparing meals just for family and friends to planning a weekly menu that bears her name at a popular restaurant. Thanks to a friend who raved about her delicately balanced lasagna to the owner of Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon, Useli now headlines a weekly four-course menu there of foods from her roots on the island of Sardinia, called Dinner With Daniela. "Italians expect a certain flavor from their lasagna," said Alberto Conti, manager of the Community Missions office at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, who introduced Useli to Riccardo Bosio, the owner of Sotto Sopra, after sampling her vegetable dish.
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