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NEWS
July 22, 2011
In the recent article questioning the leadership of the Baltimore Police Department ("Some question top leadership amid city police scandals," July 21), The Sun again shows why its staff is incapable of presenting an untainted view of events in our city. Forgive me for not respecting the views of Larry Young. I would think there is a more qualified individual to speak about city police than a former state senator removed from office for ethics violations. Asking the opinions of someone who does not know the difference between right and wrong on matters of law and order is irresponsible and absurd.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 2, 2014
The three Democratic candidates for governor will all meet for their second televised debate Monday night on Maryland Public Television and WBAL-TV, giving voters their final opportunity to see them confront each other on television. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur will go on at 7 p.m. in a debate hosted by MPT's Jeff Salkin. The three met last month in a televised debate at the University of Maryland College Park in an exchange that included lively confrontations between Brown and Gansler while Mizeur largely stayed above the fray.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2006
Former state Sen. Larry Young, a Baltimore Democrat who was expelled from the General Assembly on charges that he used his public position to enrich his private businesses, said yesterday he has chosen to continue his radio career rather than attempt a return to the legislature. Young had hinted for months that he would be a candidate for office in Senate District 44, and had already collected $40,000 in campaign contributions. But he said yesterday he is abandoning the comeback bid so he can continue his morning talk show on WOLB-AM and join the ministries of the Rev. Al Sharpton.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 31, 2014
In answer to reporters' questions about why he skipped last Tuesday's gubernatorial debate on WBFF-TV — or if he was bothered that the television station had presented him as an empty podium — Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown grinned and said the following: "I'm looking forward to the Baltimore debate on WBAL next week on Monday, and then later next week we'll be at the Larry Young [radio] show. ... Look, I'm looking forward to next week's debate. ... I'm looking forward to next week's debate, guys, it's the Baltimore debate I'm looking forward to on WBAL.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | December 11, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- The big surprise in all the recent news about state Sen. Larry Young filling his pockets with no-bid state consulting contracts is that it should come as such a big surprise.The distinguished gentleman has had his head in the public trough for years and has oinked racism whenever anyone has challenged him or been slow to provide the goodies.Most of the time, he's been allowed to get away with this unpleasantly familiar tactic -- but not always.Slurp dollarsAs long ago as 1980, those with long memories will recall, then-Delegate Young was already at work trying to slurp loose dollars out of the state budget.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 24, 2007
It looks like Larry Young may have been right, and the rest of us were probably wrong. Today, Young is a successful talk-show host on WOLB radio. Nine years ago, he was state Sen. Larry Young of Baltimore, expelled from the General Assembly after his colleagues voted him out for alleged ethics violations. Young cried foul. Actually, he did more than that. Young contended that he was targeted because he was black. Some scoffed at the notion and accused him of playing the race card. Full disclosure requires me to say that I was one of them.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
Baltimore homicide detectives have renewed their investigation into the 1990 murder of the Rev. Marvin Moore -- a probe in which state Sen. Larry Young is described by investigators as a central figure, according to police sources.Those sources say detectives are now working several new leads in the slaying of Mr. Moore, a gospel promoter. Mr. Young, a close friend of the minister, was one of several people who found Mr. Moore shot to death in his West Franklin Street apartment in May 1990.
FEATURES
By K Kaufmann | March 12, 2004
Less than a month after he was rushed to Maryland General Hospital with a life-threatening heart ailment, local talk-show host Larry Young returned to the airwaves yesterday, fielding calls from a host of well-wishers including Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. The former state senator, 55, fell ill on Feb. 22 as he was preparing for his 6 a.m. show, a mix of politics, sports and commentary, on WOLB 1010 AM. Diagnosed with double pneumonia and heart problems, Young was "blue" when he reached the emergency room, he said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Former state Sen. Larry Young, a prominent radio talk-show host in Baltimore, was improving yesterday after being rushed last month to a hospital with a life-threatening condition related to his lungs and heart, close friends and state leaders said. Doctors at Union Memorial Hospital examined his heart yesterday to see how it was functioning and to determine what happened Feb. 20 when he became ill during his WOLB radio show. "He's progressing," said state Sen. Joan Carter Conway, who spoke with Young this week and visited him shortly after he became sick.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
Larry Young, who was expelled from the Maryland Senate for ethics violations, said last night he has formed an exploratory committee to consider a run for his old seat. Young said he is considering the race because of his dissatisfaction with the leadership of District 44 and urging from former constituents. He said he will make a decision within two weeks. "The community people been calling me, `I want you to run," Young said. "It was so clear to me that there was a groundswell." He made the announcement at a barbecue gathering in the courtyard of his Eutaw Street apartment building, with supporters, including U.S. Senate candidate Kweisi Mfume; former state Sen. John D. Jeffries, who had been appointed to complete Young's term after the 1998 expulsion; Stuart O. Simms, the Democratic gubernatorial running mate of Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan; and Baltimore City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. Young, 54, has been a morning talk-show host on WOLB-AM since leaving the Senate.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
In the recent article questioning the leadership of the Baltimore Police Department ("Some question top leadership amid city police scandals," July 21), The Sun again shows why its staff is incapable of presenting an untainted view of events in our city. Forgive me for not respecting the views of Larry Young. I would think there is a more qualified individual to speak about city police than a former state senator removed from office for ethics violations. Asking the opinions of someone who does not know the difference between right and wrong on matters of law and order is irresponsible and absurd.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
Mable Payne Young, a mother of nine who helped organize job benefits for domestic workers such as herself, died of a stroke Tuesday at Maryland General Hospital. The lifelong Baltimore resident was 93. Orphaned at birth in Baltimore, the former Mable Diggs was raised by a neighbor. She attended city schools through the eighth grade, when she left to help support her adoptive family. She became a domestic worker, tending to the homes and families of others while caring for her husband, Russell Payne, and raising her children.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 24, 2007
It looks like Larry Young may have been right, and the rest of us were probably wrong. Today, Young is a successful talk-show host on WOLB radio. Nine years ago, he was state Sen. Larry Young of Baltimore, expelled from the General Assembly after his colleagues voted him out for alleged ethics violations. Young cried foul. Actually, he did more than that. Young contended that he was targeted because he was black. Some scoffed at the notion and accused him of playing the race card. Full disclosure requires me to say that I was one of them.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2006
Former state Sen. Larry Young, a Baltimore Democrat who was expelled from the General Assembly on charges that he used his public position to enrich his private businesses, said yesterday he has chosen to continue his radio career rather than attempt a return to the legislature. Young had hinted for months that he would be a candidate for office in Senate District 44, and had already collected $40,000 in campaign contributions. But he said yesterday he is abandoning the comeback bid so he can continue his morning talk show on WOLB-AM and join the ministries of the Rev. Al Sharpton.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
Larry Young, who was expelled from the Maryland Senate for ethics violations, said last night he has formed an exploratory committee to consider a run for his old seat. Young said he is considering the race because of his dissatisfaction with the leadership of District 44 and urging from former constituents. He said he will make a decision within two weeks. "The community people been calling me, `I want you to run," Young said. "It was so clear to me that there was a groundswell." He made the announcement at a barbecue gathering in the courtyard of his Eutaw Street apartment building, with supporters, including U.S. Senate candidate Kweisi Mfume; former state Sen. John D. Jeffries, who had been appointed to complete Young's term after the 1998 expulsion; Stuart O. Simms, the Democratic gubernatorial running mate of Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan; and Baltimore City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. Young, 54, has been a morning talk-show host on WOLB-AM since leaving the Senate.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 14, 2006
Getting warmed up for a second act? If Larry Young isn't plotting a political comeback, he's going to have some explaining to do. To the Rev. Al Sharpton, Lt. Gov. Michael Steele, gubernatorial hopeful Doug Duncan, Congressman Elijah Cummings and a couple of hundred others who gathered for a $100-a head "appreciation" dinner in the former state senator's honor this week at New Shiloh Baptist Church. And if he is running, he'll have some explaining to do to Sen. Verna Jones. Was the event really a campaign fundraiser?
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | May 15, 2001
I WASTED two hours of my life yesterday listening to Larry Young on the radio. The disgraced former state senator now poisons the public airwaves, decrying what he called "the bleaching of Baltimore," a phrase he used maybe three dozen times yesterday. Somewhere, a member of the Ku Klux Klan is inquiring, "How come he gets to use language like that without being called a racist - and we can't?" The bleaching of Baltimore, indeed. Young said this in the wake of last week's removal of four top-level Baltimore police officers.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | February 1, 1998
NO VOTE IN the motion to expel Larry Young from the Maryland Senate was more surprising than Sen. Christopher J. McCabe's.More attention has gone to Sen. Delores G. Kelley, a black Democrat from Baltimore who abstained from voting on the fate of her colleague from the city. Critics have all but labeled her a traitor to her race for failing to support Mr. Young, although her conscience led her to indecision.But Mr. McCabe's decision to vote against expelling Mr. Young from his senatorial seat in Baltimore's 44th Legislative District was even more intriguing.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
Larry Young, who was expelled from the state Senate in 1998 for ethics violations, seems to be gearing up for a run for his former job representing District 44. Young, 55, was recently feted at a $30 a ticket fundraiser at a friend's home in Baltimore. Young said in an interview yesterday that his friends and colleagues have at least four or five similar events planned for him. They have also been circulating a petition to collect signatures to persuade him to run. "I'm really interested," said Young, a Democrat.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
No matter the criticism hurled his way or the public humiliation, Larry Young has always maintained his innocence - and interest in resurrecting his political career. It seems the time for the latter may be coming. The 55-year-old former legislator and radio talk show host is strongly considering another run for the state Senate from District 44, which includes many of the city neighborhoods he represented for years, friends and supporters say. In January 1998, Young was expelled from the Senate for a string of ethics violations, including using his office to enrich his private businesses.
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