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Larry Walton

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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
"Old Dirty Shirt," also known as DJ Larry Walton, whose deep baritone voice and well-defined sense of the absurd and off-air antics amused Baltimore-area radio listeners for nearly three decades, was found dead of pneumonia last week at his apartment in Portland, Ore.He was 61.During his broadcasting career, he worked for nearly every Baltimore station at one time or another. He spun records and chatted from the studios of WCBM, WJZ, WITH and WFBR, and in the process developed a cult of devoted listeners.
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FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | May 25, 1997
MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALEXIS De Tocqueville Society is extended to individuals who have contributed a minimum of $10,000 and maximum of $249,999 to the United Way of Central Maryland. These big givers were entertained recently at a lovely reception at the Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton.The hosts of the event were Ben and Wendy Griswold and Roger Lipitz. Ben Griswold, of Alex. Brown Inc., was last year's 'N chairman of the society. Lipitz, of the Lipitz Family Foundation, is chair of the society for 1997.
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NEWS
October 25, 1996
As a result of editing errors, an article yesterday on the United Way of Central Maryland Inc. misstated how decisions are made on which agencies will be funded and how much money they will get. The staff and Larry Walton, president of United Way, have no role in those decisions. In fact, about 130 community volunteers who visit agencies and prepare budgets make those decisions.In addition, a photo caption reversed identifications of two United Way campaign officials, Donald A. Manekin and Mike Moynihan.
NEWS
October 25, 1996
As a result of editing errors, an article yesterday on the United Way of Central Maryland Inc. misstated how decisions are made on which agencies will be funded and how much money they will get. The staff and Larry Walton, president of United Way, have no role in those decisions. In fact, about 130 community volunteers who visit agencies and prepare budgets make those decisions.In addition, a photo caption reversed identifications of two United Way campaign officials, Donald A. Manekin and Mike Moynihan.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | May 25, 1997
MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALEXIS De Tocqueville Society is extended to individuals who have contributed a minimum of $10,000 and maximum of $249,999 to the United Way of Central Maryland. These big givers were entertained recently at a lovely reception at the Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton.The hosts of the event were Ben and Wendy Griswold and Roger Lipitz. Ben Griswold, of Alex. Brown Inc., was last year's 'N chairman of the society. Lipitz, of the Lipitz Family Foundation, is chair of the society for 1997.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
The United Way of Central Maryland said it would announce today that Larry E. Walton, head of the United Way in Richmond, will become its new president and chief professional officer Jan. 1.Mr. Walton, 49, who emerged from 137 applicants, has led Richmond's United Way since 1981. During his time there, annual campaign revenues grew from $6.1 million to $21 million, said Joseph E. Blair Jr., chairman of United Way of Central Maryland.The local United Way is in the midst of its annual campaign, which aims to raise $37 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 30, 2000
The theme was "Caring and Sharing" at the Fullwood Foundation's 12th annual Benefit and Recognition Breakfast, as the organization honored myriad Marylanders for their efforts to help the community. About 1,850 people gathered at Martin's West for the morning mingle. Among them: Harlow Fullwood Jr., foundation president; Elnora Fullwood, foundation vice president; Marcelina Morris, Betty L. Johnson, Dr. Charles Salters, Helen Dale, Larry Walton, Bessie Bordenave, honorees; Dr. Robert Booker, CEO of Baltimore City Schools; Dr. Irving McPhail, chancellor, Community College of Baltimore County; Tony Pagnotti and Sandra Pinckney, WMAR-TV personalities; Ken Higgins, president of Heavenly Ham; the Rev. Isaac Jenkins Sr., founder and executive director of Save the Youth Crime Prevention Program; Charles Stokes, Chrystel L. Sledge, Kirsten Sims and Terrence E. Robinson, student award and scholarship winners.
NEWS
November 26, 2009
Federal and state leaders are launching an effort to win funding for a statewide hot line to help connect Marylanders with health and human service. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has requested $800,000 to make the state's 211 hot line pilot program permanent and is co-sponsoring a bill that would provide dedicated funding for such services nationwide. Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and United Way of Central Maryland President Larry Walton joined Mikulski to announce the effort to secure federal funding at the call center in Baltimore on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 23, 2000
The memory of Martin Luther King Jr. was honored with a sellout crowd at the 25th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast, sponsored by the YMCA of Central Maryland and the King's Landing Women's Service Club. The Martin's West ballroom was filled with 1,000 folks who came to pay tribute to the late civil rights leader, including: Marge Green, event chair; Myrtle Harrod, Doris Street and Charles G. Tildon Jr., event committee members; A. Paul Moss, event founder; Janet Covington and Iris W. Lloyd, founding committee members; Sheila Vidmar, YMCA of Central Maryland board chair; Harold Ashby and Geraldine Young, board members; Harry Kakel, WMAR-TV production manager; Larry Walton, president of United Way of Central Maryland; keynote speaker Dr. Levi Watkins Jr., associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; and three Baltimore students, Ja'nell Townes, Theresa A. Holland and Timothy Dorsey, who wrote award-winning essays about King's life and legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 19, 1999
Call it a kickoff to the "Kickoff for the United Way" luncheons. The Ravens football team helped host the first-ever luncheon, launching the 1999 United Way of Central Maryland Community Campaign.As they arrived at the Baltimore Convention Center, 580 fans were blitzed by the Ravens cheerleaders, mascots and marching band. After going into formation for lunch, the crowd got a chalk talk from team owner Art Modell. Then the new Ravens roster debuted, with head coach Brian Billick making the calls, introducing each coach and player.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
The United Way of Central Maryland said it would announce today that Larry E. Walton, head of the United Way in Richmond, will become its new president and chief professional officer Jan. 1.Mr. Walton, 49, who emerged from 137 applicants, has led Richmond's United Way since 1981. During his time there, annual campaign revenues grew from $6.1 million to $21 million, said Joseph E. Blair Jr., chairman of United Way of Central Maryland.The local United Way is in the midst of its annual campaign, which aims to raise $37 million.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
"Old Dirty Shirt," also known as DJ Larry Walton, whose deep baritone voice and well-defined sense of the absurd and off-air antics amused Baltimore-area radio listeners for nearly three decades, was found dead of pneumonia last week at his apartment in Portland, Ore.He was 61.During his broadcasting career, he worked for nearly every Baltimore station at one time or another. He spun records and chatted from the studios of WCBM, WJZ, WITH and WFBR, and in the process developed a cult of devoted listeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 25, 2000
Ever yearn for an African adventure? That's what 500 guests got to experience at this year's "Solstice," the Maryland Science Center gala. With a party theme of "Caravans Across Africa," the Science Center was decked out in an African motif, while a tent pitched outside blazed with orange tablecloths and centerpieces of bamboo, raffia and orchids. Exuberant African musicians and dancers greeted guests as they arrived. Later, griot Mary Carter Smith enthralled listeners with traditional African storytelling.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 8, 2002
More than 75 percent of Baltimore-area residents interviewed in a United Way survey said they knew someone who has battled drug or alcohol addiction, and about two-thirds said they believe treatment works. Nearly 80 percent supported increased spending for treatment programs. "This survey supports the need for substance abuse treatment and clearly demonstrates the elevated level of concern throughout Central Maryland," said Larry E. Walton, president of United Way of Central Maryland. In the poll, several hundred residents in Baltimore and the five surrounding counties were contacted during the past year.
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