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Larry Mcmurtry

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NEWS
By James Asher | May 7, 1995
"The Late Child," by Larry McMurtry. 461 pages. New York: Simon and Schuster. $25Back in 1985, I sat down with Larry McMurtry's newest book "Lonesome Dove." I was a fan from Page One. Spellbound. His novel of men - and it was mostly about men - struggling against the wilderness was great at Page 100 and better at Page 200, 300 and on. But the last 60 pages turned me sour. Mr. McMurtry apparently ran out of steam and decided to resolve his tangled narrative by killing off all the characters I came to admire.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | December 18, 2012
I hope your holiday gift-giving included some books, and if you're still looking, here are the best coffee-table books I've seen in the past month of so. These are the sort of photo- and graphic-rich editions that look great in a living room -- and that overwhelm Kindles or other e-readers. Some favorites: -- "History's Greatest Images" by TIME, is billed as a compilation of "the World's 100 Most Influential Photographs. " The classics are all there: the flag-raising at Iwo Jima, Babe Ruth, JFK, school desegregation, the World Trade Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KEN FUSON and KEN FUSON,Special to the Sun | May 5, 2002
Sin Killer, by Larry McMurtry. Simon and Schuster. 304 pages. $25. Larry McMurtry, who seems to write good books as quickly as most people can read them, has returned to his favorite subject, the American West, in this, the first of a promised four novels to be known collectively as The Berrybender Narratives. If Sin Killer is the standard, the other three can't get here fast enough. This time, instead of following cowboys on a cattle drive (Lonesome Dove and its literary offspring) or trailing an American pioneer family as it heads west (Boone's Lick)
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
Yellowcake Ann Cummins When the Light Goes Larry McMurtry Simon & Schuster / 195 pages / $24 Larry McMurtry is one of our most prolific writers. But prolificity can bleed out talent, and his latest brief foray is not only not his best work, it's possibly his worst; and it is not, despite what the jacket copy claims, the end of the Last Picture Show and Texasville trilogy. At least we hope not! Nevertheless, McMurtry is, well, McMurtry and like potato chips or store-bought cookies, can be addictive, particularly for those who never kicked the Louis L'Amour habit and keep thinking McMurtry will write another book like The Last Picture Show, or at least reprise the characters with some kick.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
"Comanche Moon," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 752 pages. $28.50.Most of veteran writer Larry McMurtry's novels have been set in Texas and, in metaphorical terms, have been about Texas-sized subjects: betrayal, violence, redemption, friendship, courage, cruelty, power and sex.Whether in historical or contemporary settings, these novels are rich in Lone Star details and are strongly character-driven. McMurtry, whose career spans four decades, achieved breakthrough success in the early 1980s with "Lonesome Dove," a powerful and beautifully written book about 19th-century Texans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
"Duane's Depressed," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 432 pages. $26.Suppose you've never read a word by Larry McMurtry. Not even "Lonesome Dove." Nothing against the popular author. You just haven't.So now you're handed this strangely named book -- "Duane's Depressed" -- and are told that it represents the final chapter of McMurtry's trilogy about a desolate Texas oil patch called Thalia, where a man named Duane Moore has impulsively decided to stop driving his pickup truck and walk.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
Yellowcake Ann Cummins When the Light Goes Larry McMurtry Simon & Schuster / 195 pages / $24 Larry McMurtry is one of our most prolific writers. But prolificity can bleed out talent, and his latest brief foray is not only not his best work, it's possibly his worst; and it is not, despite what the jacket copy claims, the end of the Last Picture Show and Texasville trilogy. At least we hope not! Nevertheless, McMurtry is, well, McMurtry and like potato chips or store-bought cookies, can be addictive, particularly for those who never kicked the Louis L'Amour habit and keep thinking McMurtry will write another book like The Last Picture Show, or at least reprise the characters with some kick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
The Wandering Hill, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $26. When we last left the Berrybenders, an eccentric, selfish and clueless family of English aristocrats bumbling their way across the American West in the 1880s, they had left their steamer, Rocky Mount, stuck in the ice near the Knife River. They were fish out of water, and the water was frozen solid. In this, the second of Larry McMurtry's four-part saga, the Berrybenders and their entourage have landed at a trading post near the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, where they will try to survive the winter, the various Indian tribes and each other.
NEWS
By John F. Kelly | August 10, 1992
THE EVENING STAR. By Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 637 pages. $23.FIFTY pages into "The Evening Star," Larry McMurtry's long sequel to "Terms of Endearment," I hated it. Fifty more pages and I began to think, well, maybe it isn't so bad after all. Another 50 pages and I was so enthralled with Aurora and Rosie and the General and Patsy and Melanie and Tommy and Teddy and Jane and Bump that I could hardly put the book down.The funny thing is, I was back to hating it again. Reading this book, I felt the way I do when someone convinces me I should watch the hottest new sitcom on TV. I am appalled that I'm wasting my time on such drivel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | November 5, 2000
"Boone's Lick," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Shuster. 287 pages. $24. Ma Cecil looks down at the big roan horse she's just shot out from under Sheriff Baldy Stone. "An elk," she says. "I thought it was a big fat elk, walking right up to my door." Then she pauses and adds, "I thought, no more mush, we're going to be eating elk." Ma's no fool. She knows antlers from stirrups. But Missouri farm life in 1866 is so tough even the sheriff's horse is fair game. And Mary Margaret Cecil is hungrier than anybody realizes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2005
The Colonel and Little Missie: Buffalo Bill, Annie Oakley, and the Beginnings of Superstardom in America By Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 256 pages. $26. Few famous Americans have been more misunderstood than William Frederick Cody, the plainsman-turned-showman who was indisputably the nation's first superstar. "The Last of the Great Scouts" died nearly 90 years ago, but he is always with us, as the novelist Larry McMurtry persuasively argues in The Colonel and Little Missie: Buffalo Bill, Annie Oakley, and the Beginnings of Superstardom in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | December 5, 2004
Loop Group, by Larry McMurtry. Simon and Schuster. 242 pages. $25. Not far into Larry McMurtry's latest novel, Loop Group, one of the characters observes that a trip planned across the American West from Hollywood to the Texas panhandle by two aging single women eager for some adventure sounds like Thelma and Louise II. Leave aside for a moment that the reader may have already made this observation independently. The similarity to the film is both an asset and a liability to McMurtry's comic tale of aging, friendship, dysfunctional family life, being an older woman in America, Hollywood and the beginning of a new century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
Folly and Glory, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 256 pages. $25. Like all births, the creation of the American West was bloody, chaotic, painful and occasionally terrifying. It was not, as Larry McMurtry has reminded us repeatedly throughout his literary career, easy. And it most assuredly was not romantic. Which brings us to Folly and Glory, the fourth and final installment in what McMurtry calls The Berrybender Narratives, his ambitious epic of the taming of the American West, as seen through the eyes of a dysfunctional family of spoiled British aristocrats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
By Sorrow's River, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 368 pages. $26. Through the first two novels in a planned four-book set, members of the Lord Berrybender family have survived - some of them, anyway - random Indian attacks, brutal blizzards and a rampaging buffalo stampede. What other perils await these wacky European aristocrats and their servants, whose oafish patriarch decided for some strange reason to embark on a hunting trip throughout the untamed American West in the 1800s?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
The Wandering Hill, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $26. When we last left the Berrybenders, an eccentric, selfish and clueless family of English aristocrats bumbling their way across the American West in the 1880s, they had left their steamer, Rocky Mount, stuck in the ice near the Knife River. They were fish out of water, and the water was frozen solid. In this, the second of Larry McMurtry's four-part saga, the Berrybenders and their entourage have landed at a trading post near the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, where they will try to survive the winter, the various Indian tribes and each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEN FUSON and KEN FUSON,Special to the Sun | May 5, 2002
Sin Killer, by Larry McMurtry. Simon and Schuster. 304 pages. $25. Larry McMurtry, who seems to write good books as quickly as most people can read them, has returned to his favorite subject, the American West, in this, the first of a promised four novels to be known collectively as The Berrybender Narratives. If Sin Killer is the standard, the other three can't get here fast enough. This time, instead of following cowboys on a cattle drive (Lonesome Dove and its literary offspring) or trailing an American pioneer family as it heads west (Boone's Lick)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Paradise," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 159 pages. $24. If ever an opening paragraph were guaranteed to snag readers prone to wanderlust, it would seem to be this one from Larry McMurtry: "I am in Punaauia, Tahiti, in a thatched bungalow with a twenty-foot ceiling. My bungalow sits at the end of a clattery wooden walkway, built over Punaauia's perfect blue lagoon. The South Pacific, here in its gentlest mode, laps a few feet below my bed. In effect I sleep on the most soothing of water beds, one whose blue waters slap and sigh, untrapped."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | November 7, 1999
"Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen," by Larry McMurtry. Simon and Schuster. 204 pages. $21.Larry McMurtry loved his father.Now a real west Texas cowboy would never just come out and say such a thing. He might talk about his horse in affectionate terms, and he might cry at his old man's funeral, but you'd have better luck stealing his boots than getting a true cowboy to wax sentimental.McMurtry was almost a real cowboy. He spent 20 years helping his father raise Hereford cows on land more suitable for buffalo, but his passion was herding words, not cattle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Paradise," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 159 pages. $24. If ever an opening paragraph were guaranteed to snag readers prone to wanderlust, it would seem to be this one from Larry McMurtry: "I am in Punaauia, Tahiti, in a thatched bungalow with a twenty-foot ceiling. My bungalow sits at the end of a clattery wooden walkway, built over Punaauia's perfect blue lagoon. The South Pacific, here in its gentlest mode, laps a few feet below my bed. In effect I sleep on the most soothing of water beds, one whose blue waters slap and sigh, untrapped."
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | November 5, 2000
"Boone's Lick," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Shuster. 287 pages. $24. Ma Cecil looks down at the big roan horse she's just shot out from under Sheriff Baldy Stone. "An elk," she says. "I thought it was a big fat elk, walking right up to my door." Then she pauses and adds, "I thought, no more mush, we're going to be eating elk." Ma's no fool. She knows antlers from stirrups. But Missouri farm life in 1866 is so tough even the sheriff's horse is fair game. And Mary Margaret Cecil is hungrier than anybody realizes.
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