Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLarry Lucchino
IN THE NEWS

Larry Lucchino

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1996
Announcer Mel Proctor officially ended his 13-year relationship with the Orioles and Home Team Sports yesterday.Proctor signed to do play-by-play for San Diego Padres cable and broadcast television, a position he held with HTS since 1984. The deal with the Padres is for three years, according to league sources."It was the most difficult decision I've ever had to make," said Proctor, also a Washington Bullets announcer since 1985. "I've worked for HTS since the very beginning, and they've allowed me to grow and mature as a broadcaster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
It must be great to be Bud Selig right now. Baseball's embattled commissioner has been catching flak from all directions for his controversial plan to eliminate two franchises. Now, it seems, he can't sneeze without raising questions about the propriety of some aspect of baseball's busy off-season agenda. Michigan congressman John Conyers, the newest champion of baseball antitrust reform, recently called for Selig's resignation after it was revealed that his Milwaukee Brewers (who technically are operated by his daughter, Wendy Selig-Prieb)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Ben Harrington, who sleeps with Cal Ripken's autograph near his bed, tried to get tickets to Opening Day. His father tried to get him tickets to Opening Day. But scalpers want more than a 10-year-old can afford or a father is willing to pay.Then Gov. William Donald Schaefer mused during a radio program that he was feeling blue and might not go to Monday's inaugural game.To Ben, an Annapolis fifth-grader and Oriole fan extraordinaire, that sounded like two tickets up for grabs."I figured I had nothing to lose," Ben said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1996
Announcer Mel Proctor officially ended his 13-year relationship with the Orioles and Home Team Sports yesterday.Proctor signed to do play-by-play for San Diego Padres cable and broadcast television, a position he held with HTS since 1984. The deal with the Padres is for three years, according to league sources."It was the most difficult decision I've ever had to make," said Proctor, also a Washington Bullets announcer since 1985. "I've worked for HTS since the very beginning, and they've allowed me to grow and mature as a broadcaster.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Ben Harrington, who sleeps with Cal Ripken's autograph near his bed, tried to get tickets to Opening Day. His father tried to get him tickets to Opening Day. But scalpers want more than a 10-year-old can afford or a father is willing to pay.Then Gov. William Donald Schaefer mused during a radio program that he was feeling blue and might not go to Monday's inaugural game.To Ben, an Annapolis fifth-grader and Oriole fan extraordinaire, that sounded like two tickets up for grabs."I figured I had nothing to lose," Ben said yesterday.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 10, 1993
Now that Larry Lucchino placed himself on front-office waivers and is free to look at other opportunities, the chance to sign on with any new football team that might come to Baltimore offers intrigue and appeal. Reports he has already embarked on such a mission were dispelled today, but, then again, don't rule out the possibility of his joining the scrimmage.To this point in the machinations of Baltimore's acquiring a National Football League expansion franchise, Lucchino, once the president of the Orioles, doesn't have an official position.
SPORTS
June 14, 1991
After Eli Jacobs said last week that he was considering selling the Orioles, we asked readers if they thought he had been a good or bad owner since taking over the franchise in 1988. We received 289 responses to the question, and 137 of you commented on his ownership. As in the "It's Your Call" vote, in which 58 percent of you thought he was a "bad" owner, the comments were also fairly divided.HE'S A GOOD OWNERI feel Eli Jacobs did the best he could in the position that he was in, by allowing the people below him, like Larry Lucchino and Roland Hemond, to handle things.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
It has become common practice in the construction of large civic projects to accentuate the performance of the group rather than the genius of the individual.But those who doubt that one person still can make a difference need only look at the contributions of Janet Marie Smith, who leaves her job today as vice president of planning and development for the Baltimore Orioles.When the Mississippi native came to Baltimore in February 1989, no one knew quite what to make of her sweet-talking, Southern belle manner.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990
An Orioles' wish listThe following is a Christmas list for the 1991 Orioles.1) Frank Robinson -- A microphone so he can be heard publicly admitting that he is just as frustrated by the O's tight-fisted management as we, the fans, are.2) Roland Hemond -- A waiver wire that does not come from the south side of Chicago (the White Sox rejects).3) Cal Ripken -- A .300 hitter with power so Cal can see some good pitches. This is about as likely as a 10-year-old getting a Porsche.4) Eli Jacobs/Larry Lucchino -- The realization that a serious drop in ticket prices is justifiable since they don't pay major-league wages.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | February 24, 1991
The Baltimore Orioles appear to be holding fast to their grand plan to mold an American League pennant contender with players who play hard and play relatively cheaply.But the price has gone up.The Orioles payroll, which was a major-league-low $7.9 million last year, will increase to about $14.6 million in 1991, according to information supplied by management and player sources.Orioles president Larry Lucchino declined to comment on his team's payroll, saying the information was confidential.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Former Orioles great Frank Robinson has been struggling to find a job since he was fired as the Orioles assistant general manager in December."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
It has become common practice in the construction of large civic projects to accentuate the performance of the group rather than the genius of the individual.But those who doubt that one person still can make a difference need only look at the contributions of Janet Marie Smith, who leaves her job today as vice president of planning and development for the Baltimore Orioles.When the Mississippi native came to Baltimore in February 1989, no one knew quite what to make of her sweet-talking, Southern belle manner.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 10, 1993
Now that Larry Lucchino placed himself on front-office waivers and is free to look at other opportunities, the chance to sign on with any new football team that might come to Baltimore offers intrigue and appeal. Reports he has already embarked on such a mission were dispelled today, but, then again, don't rule out the possibility of his joining the scrimmage.To this point in the machinations of Baltimore's acquiring a National Football League expansion franchise, Lucchino, once the president of the Orioles, doesn't have an official position.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 30, 1993
Larry Lucchino, the Orioles' president and CEO for the past five seasons, ended months of speculation about his future with the club yesterday, turning down an offer from new managing general partner Peter Angelos to remain with the club as vice chairman in charge of baseball operations.Lucchino, who has been an Orioles executive since 1979, chose to pursue other opportunities, but he has agreed to serve on the club's board of directors until he decides where his career will take him."I have decided that it is time for me to make a change," Lucchino said during an afternoon news conference at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
Larry Lucchino could have headed for the Mediterranean last week, or Cancun or some Hawaiian resort. He cashed out on Monday and did very well in the deal that transferred ownership of the Orioles to the group headed by Peter G. Angelos. But he has shown up at 9 o'clock sharp every day, ready to go to work for his third owner in six years.How long he will remain with the club has been the subject of wide speculation -- speculation that has put him in the Florida Marlins front office and even into the unlikely role of baseball commissioner.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 3, 1992
I have this recurring dream. The scene is Eli Jacobs' luxury sky box at Camden Yards. Jacobs, while munching on some shrimp etouffee, calls over to Larry Lucchino in his luxury sky box, where Lucchino -- always nervous when the boss calls, as well as most other waking moments -- is munching on his fingernails. As he heads down the hallway separating the two boxes, Lucchino strides past the mahogany inlay that is so endemic to the traditional baseball experience."What's up, chief?" Lucchino says upon his arrival.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
It must be great to be Bud Selig right now. Baseball's embattled commissioner has been catching flak from all directions for his controversial plan to eliminate two franchises. Now, it seems, he can't sneeze without raising questions about the propriety of some aspect of baseball's busy off-season agenda. Michigan congressman John Conyers, the newest champion of baseball antitrust reform, recently called for Selig's resignation after it was revealed that his Milwaukee Brewers (who technically are operated by his daughter, Wendy Selig-Prieb)
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 3, 1992
I have this recurring dream. The scene is Eli Jacobs' luxury sky box at Camden Yards. Jacobs, while munching on some shrimp etouffee, calls over to Larry Lucchino in his luxury sky box, where Lucchino -- always nervous when the boss calls, as well as most other waking moments -- is munching on his fingernails. As he heads down the hallway separating the two boxes, Lucchino strides past the mahogany inlay that is so endemic to the traditional baseball experience."What's up, chief?" Lucchino says upon his arrival.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Ben Harrington, who sleeps with Cal Ripken's autograph near his bed, tried to get tickets to Opening Day. His father tried to get him tickets to Opening Day. But scalpers want more than a 10-year-old can afford or a father is willing to pay.Then Gov. William Donald Schaefer mused during a radio program that he was feeling blue and might not go to Monday's inaugural game.To Ben, an Annapolis fifth-grader and Oriole fan extraordinaire, that sounded like two tickets up for grabs."I figured I had nothing to lose," Ben said yesterday.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Ben Harrington, who sleeps with Cal Ripken's autograph near his bed, tried to get tickets to Opening Day. His father tried to get him tickets to Opening Day. But scalpers want more than a 10-year-old can afford or a father is willing to pay.Then Gov. William Donald Schaefer mused during a radio program that he was feeling blue and might not go to Monday's inaugural game.To Ben, an Annapolis fifth-grader and Oriole fan extraordinaire, that sounded like two tickets up for grabs."I figured I had nothing to lose," Ben said yesterday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.